Arctic Chat : Arctic Cat Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
412 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since MOST of us have little or no snow to play in, how 'bout sharing some info on tools, hints, and tips for working on the new Cat clutches (F1000).

DRIVEN CLUTCH:
-------------------

What tool(s) are required to take apart the driven clutch?

Do you need a special tool for reassembly?

Torque specs?

Loctite?

DRIVE CLUTCH:
------------------

What's the easiest/best way to work on the drive clutch, as far as simply changing weights? Take the clutch completely off and disassemble? Is there a certain clutch compression tool that works best on these clutches? I don't know yet if the Bunker Hill "Dummy Clutch Tool" that worked so slick on my '03 F7 will work on the F1000 clutch. Same threads or not – anyone?

F1000 Clutch Puller: #0644-446 (Cat)

Drive Clutch Retaining Bolt: T60 torx socket (Torque spec for this bolt?)

The set screw style cam arms are new to me too. What is there to know about messing with these?

Is Loctite used/required on the set screws, and if so, what strength – red or blue?

What about the cam arm pins and nuts – how tight should they be, or is there a torque spec for that?

Loctite on the cam arm pin nut, and if so, what strength – red or blue?

OK, that's all I can think of... for now. Any and all help, hints, tips, and feedback is greatly appreciated.

Thanks! – Roy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Blus loctite for the set screws, and cam arm pins. I only tightened the cam pins so that they would not fall freely when lifted back, then I backed the nut off until they would fall on their own. You do leave the nut a bit loose to accomplish this, so I will keep an eye on it when I get some seat time to make sure it doesn't work loose, but I did put a good amount of loctite on the nut.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,986 Posts
I don't use torque wrenches on anything. I tighten the primary bolt holding onto the clutch, when I can't keep it from spinning in my hand, it's tight enough. It's the taper that holds the clutch on. Use a thin wall socket for the primary weights, a standard one is too thick and it makes it hard to remove the bolts. You will need to heat the set screws with a torch the first time you take the weights off or you break your fingers or the allen wrench. slaphappy Makes it much easier to loosen. I use purple Loctite for small fasteners on the set screws for the weights. The pin nuts are tightened until they bottom out, and there will be drag on them from the O rings. I have run my sleds with or without the O rings at the track and it doesn't make a difference. The secondary bolt is a 9/16 or possibly metric, I din't check to see what else fits. I spin the aluminum bushing around to open the secondary to get the belt off. You will have to remove the weashers from the bolt first to do this. There are holders available to compress the secondary to get the bolts out. Be careful with the small torx bolts holding the helix on, they can snap easily if over tightened. I used blue loctite on those, but I'm sure my purple would have worked also. I'm working on building some secondary clutch compressors that will be sold through The Outdoor Shop. Just trying to figure out a way to make a high quality tool that's cheaper than what's availble now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
412 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys for your good, helpful info there!

Looney, do you use any kind of drive clutch compression tool for quicker weight changes? – Roy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
412 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
What about torque specs (and/or loctite) for the driven clutch bolt? I've had that loosen up a few times already, with the resulting squealing belt and messed up engagement/low-end shift pattern. Really screws things up, but glad I haven't lost the bolt and cap yet. – Roy
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top