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Someone brought this to my attention this weekend. My dad was out ice fishing this last week and someone asked him about his arctic cat and how he liked it.. he said it was a great machine.. but then the guy asked him about his plow blade and asked him if his battery is always dead when you rest the blade on the ground to park it..my dad was kind of puzzled because the battery is always dead. ( So why is this with the blade on the ground the battery drains?)
and has anyone ever have this happen to them?
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (locator441 @ Dec 21 2009, 10:01 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
Someone brought this to my attention this weekend. My dad was out ice fishing this last week and someone asked him about his arctic cat and how he liked it.. he said it was a great machine.. but then the guy asked him about his plow blade and asked him if his battery is always dead when you rest the blade on the ground to park it..my dad was kind of puzzled because the battery is always dead. ( So why is this with the blade on the ground the battery drains?)
and has anyone ever have this happen to them?[/b]
To test the theory, rest the blade on a non-conductive material, like a piece of wood.

If the battery is still dying consistently, blade on the ground has nothing to do with it (the battery is likely toast anyway). In fact, it shouldn't happen. I've parked mine for weeks at a time with the blade down, no chunk of wood, battery is always fine.

Plowing is hard on a battery. Not because the battery is incapable of powering the winch sufficiently, but because starting the engine and using the winch can draw more power from the battery than the alternator can charge during plowing. Problem is increased if headlights are used!

I would like to suggest starting with a new battery and use a Battery Tender. Keep the battery tender plugged into the quad for all times the ATV is parked. It will replace the charge that the alternator didn't supply during plowing. It will also prevent sulfation, which is a condition created by low battery voltages due to insufficienet alternator charging duing starting, plowing, headlights, etc. Sulfation causes the battery to not accept a charge, and so the avialable power stored in the battery will be down and diminish more over time. A battery tender type of charger is the cure.

If you use automotive style chargers, it will overcharge and destroy the battery as well, so stay away from them. The rule of thumb is to not use a charger with a charge rate greater than 10% of the battery. If your battery is a 14 amp battery, the charging amperage should not exceed 1.4 amps. Automotive charges with 2 amp trickle charger will charge at 6, 10, 15, amps (whatever full charger capacity amperage is), until battery voltage is up and then the charger will come down to a 2 amp float cycle and stay there! This means the automotive charger will overcharge and destroy the battery even when in trickle charge mode. Never use automotive style chargers even if it has a trickle charge mode.

A battery tender will pay for itself in battery replacement dollars (and future burnt alternator coils on the quad's stator assembly). Worth every penny.
 

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In general, the charging system and weak stock battery can't keep a full charge when plowing. Especially the low rpm, back and forth, frequent up and downs of driveway plowing.

I recommend a battery maintainer. $20-30 well spent. A better battery is nice too. Something with more amphours. A good one is going to cost $70-125.

Back to the plow on the ground, It's possible, but I'm doubt full, that you are grounding something with the plow down. Put a block of wood under it, and see if that changes anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I use a rubber blade due to the fact it's nice on grass. but when I have the steel cutting blade on mine it is always dead.. I do have a new battery on mine and the same as my dad
 

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I think the alternator puts out roughly 25 amps. A winch will draw anywhere from 20-40 amps (depending on the winch and the load). Partner that with a stock battery and that adds up to a quick drain, which will kill a battery not only short term but long term as well due to the heat generated.

If you're suggesting that the battery is fine when you park it but is drained when you return, then you have an electrical draw somewhere and it would be time to bust out the multimeter to see what is causing the draw.
 

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Its hard to believe the plow effects the battery in any way when parked,key off, with the blade on the ground. I believe as others suggested that the battery is probably in a discharged state after plowing and doesn't rebound because of the cold. I have all my equipment on deltran chargers and never have issues in the 2 yrs. after getting them. I even have my truck which sits alot in the winter on a larger deltran 6 amp I believe.

Try after plowing, measure the voltage of your battery, with the machine off, its probably low. I forget the exact voltage it should be at maybe 12.6 volts or so but I bet its alot lower. Then in the am just measure it again, probably around 10-11v or so.
 

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That is crazy if that is happening for sure..lol
I can park mine with the plow down with no problems and mine starts just fine in the winter no isssues at all, But i do have a good battery a pc 680 ..
 

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Never had any problems parking the atv with the plow down, but in my case, when its parked the battery tender is plugged in.

Scenerio much like what you are talking about........take a fully charged battery, run a wire from the negative post and run it into the ground and see if it will discharge.....never done it, but I don't think it will, but I could be wrong.

Maybe somebody will try this experiment....too cold out for me.
 

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Plow being on the ground has nutin to do with nutin. Unless the plow being on the ground shorts a postive wire to the chassis or something along those lines.
 

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The only possible difference with the blade on the ground is maybe it possibly provides a true earth ground like driving a copper spike into the earth, but I still don't get how it could possibly discharge the battery. The atv is on all rubber which isolates it till you drop the blade to the ground. Just throwing ideas out there.
 

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My 09 550 efi has killed the battery, plowing winch, hot grips and an extra light all suck da juice man!
I now try yo plow/push snow in LOW and get the rpms up there, then when I am done I go for a 5-10 minute ride to help replace all the charge I sucked off the top (so to speak)
I wish there was a bigger battery... I was looking at NAPA at tractor batteries... hmmmm
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (UNKnXFIRE @ Dec 22 2009, 11:23 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
My 09 550 efi has killed the battery, plowing winch, hot grips and an extra light all suck da juice man!
I now try yo plow/push snow in LOW and get the rpms up there, then when I am done I go for a 5-10 minute ride to help replace all the charge I sucked off the top (so to speak)
I wish there was a bigger battery... I was looking at NAPA at tractor batteries... hmmmm[/b]
If you have the rear le bumper, you can add a 2ed car battery to the quad. Just wire them in parallel other wise you will burn up your bike.
 

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Just get an ODYSSEY PC680 and you won't have to worry about a dead battery......That's what I did.
 

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I got hte Pc680 as well and have NEVER had an issue wiht it draining down while plowing, and that's with 4 strobes, HID's, auxillary 55W flood lights on my racks and hand warms on high. I plow about 8 driveways around here as well, so it's not a 10 minute job. With a stock battery, after 3 drives I was really struggling with the battery.

Enough said. :)
 

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Just a quick note on the above problem. Concrete WILL conduct electricity, it actually makes a really good ground. If you have a battery with a short in one cell, it will allow the battery to disepate to ground if the negative has a true earth ground, wich would be provided through the blade, eliminating the isolated system.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
well I got a new batt.. for X-mas and so far so good as long as I leave the blade up and not on the ground.. we got 25" of snow over the weekend and it got a work out for awhile. but after awhile I had no where to push it anymore so had to break out the snow blower.... thank you all for your 2-cents
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (locator441 @ Dec 29 2009, 03:47 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
well I got a new batt.. for X-mas and so far so good as long as I leave the blade up and not on the ground.. we got 25" of snow over the weekend and it got a work out for awhile. but after awhile I had no where to push it anymore so had to break out the snow blower.... thank you all for your 2-cents[/b]

JMO but you probably shouldn't leave a load on your winch.
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (CJM @ Dec 23 2009, 06:49 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
Just a quick note on the above problem. Concrete WILL conduct electricity, it actually makes a really good ground. If you have a battery with a short in one cell, it will allow the battery to disepate to ground if the negative has a true earth ground, wich would be provided through the blade, eliminating the isolated system.[/b]

Sanny, did you read this....my theory proven. :moon:

Well not exactly but, :lol: I like what CJM said.

Where are all the electrical engineers when you need one??
 
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