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Discussion Starter #1
I just rode my 2015 zr8000 back to back w my 2007 Jaguar z1. Holy ****. The hand warmers are so much better. Why? What is the difference? What can I do to get my grips warmer?


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Put Odi grips on it. That will help it out. They changed the grips in like 2016 or 17 and it made a difference
 

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What size windshield? I use gauntlets on my 2018 when it is really cold and my hands sweat. My 20 is amazingly warm.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I have a mid size shield. Maybe it’s tall. It isn’t the windshield; I got back to my place after my gf was riding the z1 and put them away back to back. The twinspar grips are way way way warmer


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I also have the mid windshield and I found it to warm so I cut 5 inches off.
Now with my hands I needed more warmth so I put on some over size hand guards. When it -20 c I only need to run warmers on low. I don’t wear thick gloves. I usually wear Mechanic gloves down to about -10 c.
Hand guards are flexible so if your playing in the snow and put it on its side they don’t break like the cat guards. And there cheap 80 bucks plus 50 for mounting hardware.
363491
 

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The earlier version of grips take a lot longer to reach temp. They work, it just takes more time. The grips were changed on the 2017 sleds. The thinner grips heat faster if you can get enough rpms. Part of the issue is the stator output at low rpms. There seems to be a fine line matching the output to riding speed. Idle will produce some heat. Mid speed with lower rpms, and the output struggles to keep the grips warm. Pin it and hold it for awhile. The grips get super hot.
I haven't spend much time riding with aftermarket grips. I do know that the variable setting controls are a big improvement for comfort. (Cat started using those in 2019 with some of the lineup.) Unfortunately, there is not a simple way to retrofit that style on older machines.
Maybe someone can chime in with options for aftermarket grips with more heat adjustment options.
 

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The new grips are available as a set from cat, pretty cheap. There are aftermarket warmers that claim to be higher output, but I have no experience with them
 

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I own a 15 and a 16 sled. I pretty much never have cold hands. My wife, a different story. Same windshields too. I purchased these late last year and was amazed Arctic Cat Semi-Rigid Handlebar Muffs - Universal. They go on in a few seconds. Last ride last year, high temp for that day was 4 (f). She had to turn the warmers off quite a few times. These things work, plain and simple. I use Cat gloves and they are thin on the palm side and thick on the outer side. I feel the warmers within a half mile most times. Buddy we ride with (doo) his hands were ice cold with gauntlets and warmers. His gloves are way too thick to feel the warmers. Its a combination of gloves, windshield, and some people just have cold hands and have a hard time getting them warmed up. I bring those gauntlets with me on every trip, but so far this season havent had to use them. She will not ride without them, but if her hands get too warm, we just remove them. probably the cheapest way to remedy cold hands are these gauntlets.
 

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In all my years of riding, nothing has been warmer than my 07 Z1. The heat of the 4 stroke, plus great wind protection of the Twin Spar, worked well. I have a set of RSI warmers on my 7000, mount just like the oem ones, supposed to be 15-20% warmer on each setting. They work well, though I never compared them to another procross side by side.
 

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Buying good glove helps. My 15's hand warmers were hot enough to turn them off on my 800. But I have Klim Elite gloves , they cost a lot but you get what you pay for
 

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I've never tried this but have heard of it. People have sprayed low expansion insulation inside the handle bars. The stuff you would use on door jambs and windows from home Depot etc. Just drill a small hole in the grip end and spray. keep wiping up the extra that escapes. Seems like it would help, at least a little.
 

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I use the spray foam on my sleds, can't really say it's better or not. Can't be worse. Make sure you cover the opposite side, when you're spraying the first side. It will spray over everything, including the sled next to it. Ask me how I know this.
 

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I use the spray foam on my sleds, can't really say it's better or not. Can't be worse. Make sure you cover the opposite side, when you're spraying the first side. It will spray over everything, including the sled next to it. Ask me how I know this.
For some reason I can hear the swearing that went on.
 

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Captainruss99, Thanks for the insight.
660catman, I think I heard the same swearing. 🙂

To the OP question. Does anyone else know how the Z1 power to handwarmers would vary vs. the Zuke 800 stator? I don't know the 4S output at low rpms.

I battle with cold fingers myself. This subject hits close to home, so I'm always looking for an answer to keeping hands warm.
I also swap between sleds quite a bit. Most of the time, they are 2S 800 machines of various years. There is a big difference between the machines. Twin Spar sleds are just plain warmer to ride. Windshield size and style, on the same machine, also make a big difference. Windshield shape is a big factor. I've sat behind some tall windshields that are cold riding buggers. Oddly, it seems like some hand guard setups actually direct more air at my hands. (It is hard to quantify cold air pressure, maybe it isn't a big factor.)

I'm not sure if this helps to answer the OP?
Gloves do make a difference. Some just plain work better to transfer grip heat. I swap gloves a lot just for the temps. The right glove for cold temps isn't always the best riding glove. Long rides with the wrong gloves can be miserable. I try to match the gloves to the machine's wind protection ability. My goal is the best grip and least possible glove that still keeps my fingers warm enough for the riding conditions.
 

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Over the years seems like the warmers like a certain rpm and they come on like gangbusters. Its different with every sled. Also rider activity. Start leaning in the corners, transferring weight back and forth and trying to avoid the big whoops heats up your whole body, hands included. Its those long straight, smooth trails that make hands cold. In the early years, none of my sleds came with warmers. I remember using the exhaust pipe as a warmer when I just couldnt take it any longer. stop, raise the hood and put my gloves on it till they started to smoke. Ahhh yes, a 50 mile round trip took all day. But it sure was fun.
 

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I find my T660 4 stroke ones to be better than my Bearcat 570. Both do work better with higher RPM and of course your gloves are not too thick on the palms. I find the thumb warmer not as good.
@tiggershark, I remember my 80 EL Tigre 6000 had the rad right in front of your handlebars and you could reach in and put your hands on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I am guessing it's probably the current produced at lower RPMs on the zuke 800 vs the alternator on the 4 stroke. If I remember right, this is why the 4 stroke sleds offered a heated seat, and the two stroke versions of the same sled did not. I think this is probably the issue, after talking to a few people about it.
 

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I just rode my 2015 zr8000 back to back w my 2007 Jaguar z1. Holy ****. The hand warmers are so much better. Why? What is the difference? What can I do to get my grips warmer?
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Hand warmer temperature is part of the equation. But not the whole.
Sure some are better than others, but consider the difference in the two sleds designs.

2015 ZR8000...rider forward, legs upright, sled cowling tapered directing air flow towards rider.
2007 Jaguar Z1...rider back, legs back, sled cowling not as tapered directing air flow away from rider.

The human body is designed for survival. Organ temperature is critical for survival.
The body will minimize blood flow, to non-critical areas, in order to maintain vital organ temperature.
That means the hands & feet are the first to go.
Keeping the core & legs warm will result in warmer hands.

Combined with a great base layer, Merino wool comes to mind, our riding gear must have the best "wind-sulation" as possible to maintain core temperature.

Gone are the days of blue jean riding, while hiding behind the hood, letting the engine heat keep us warm.
Now it just all blows on by. Thus, we must adjust.
 
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