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Discussion Starter #1
We have two 07 700's,
The one with the least amount of miles flashes volt constantly. It has a 4 year old Motobatt 25 amp battery in it.
voltage before start up 12.55
cranking..11.67
running 14.61
Ran it yesterday and after about 10 minutes of low speed crusing, Volt appeared again. 3rd time out of the last 3 times it was used.
So, I switched batteries with the other 07 700 which has the same battery but its less than 6 months old.
Now it's fixed. no more flash.
So you would think the other quad would start to flash volt if the battery wasn't up to par.
Nope. both quads run good and neither flash Volt.
I dont get it.
I suppose i should get both tested?
IDK...

Keep reading, the problem is addressed later on in this thread.
 

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I would place it under a trickle charger for a day and see if that helps. Motobatt is an AGM battery, so you haven't been using a non-AGM charger or tender on it have you?
 

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All electronic parts have a variable on their claimed spec's.
It sounds like one battery is simply a little less than the other when tested under a load. Then the spec's of your one quad determining "a good battery" is a little different than the other. Personally I would not worry about it, and simply write it off as natural variation. Plus I have seen this before. (not on a Cat, but on other batteries)

However for the sake of providing a more formal explanation I copied this from the National Science Foundations online learning website.
"Battery capacity" is a measure (typically in Amp-hr) of the charge stored by the battery, and is determined by the mass of active material contained in the battery. The battery capacity represents the maximum amount of energy that can be extracted from the battery under certain specified conditions. However, the actual energy storage capabilities of the battery can vary significantly from the "nominal" rated capacity, as the battery capacity depends strongly on the age and past history of the battery, the charging or discharging regimes of the battery and the temperature.
Units of Battery Capacity: Ampere Hours

The energy stored in a battery, called the battery capacity, is measured in either watt-hours (Wh), kilowatt-hours (kWh), or ampere-hours (Ahr). The most common measure of battery capacity is Ah, defined as the number of hours for which a battery can provide a current equal to the discharge rate at the nominal voltage of the battery. The unit of Ah is commonly used when working with battery systems as the battery voltage will vary throughout the charging or discharging cycle. The Wh capacity can be approximated from the Ahr capacity by multiplying the AH capacity by the nominal (or, if known, time average) battery voltage. A more accurate approach takes into account the variation of voltage by integrating the AH capacity x V(t) over the the time of the charging cycle. For example, a 12 volt battery with a capacity of 500 Ah battery allows energy storage of approximately 100 Ah x 12 V = 1,200 Wh or 1.2 KWh. However, because of the large impact from charging rates or temperatures, for parcitcal or accurate analysis, additional information about the variation of battery capacity are also provided by battery manufacturers.
(INSERT CALCULATOR AND EQUATION FOR BATTERY CAPACITY)
Depth of Discharge

In many types of batteries, the full energy stored in the battery cannot be withdrawn (in other words, the battery cannot be fully discharged) without causing serious, and often irreparable damage to the battery. The Depth of Discharge (DOD) of a battery determines the fraction of power that can be withdrawn from the battery. For example, if the DOD of a battery is given by the manufacturer as 25%, then only 25% of the battery capacity can be used by the load.
(INSERT CALCULATOR AND EQUATION FOR useable BATTERY CAPACITY and DOD.)
In addition to an overall DOD below which the battery should not be discharged, many battery manufacturers will specify a daily DOD, which determines that maximum power that can be withdrawn from a battery in a single day.
(INSERT CALCULATOR AND EQUATION FOR daily BATTERY CAPACITY and daily DOD.)
Impact of Charging and Discharging Rate

The charging/discharging rates affect the rated battery capacity. If the battery is being discharged very quickly (i.e., the discharge current is high), then the amount of energy that can be extracted from the battery is reduced and the battery capacity is lower. This is due to the fact the necessary components for the reaction to occur do not necessarily have enough time to either move to their necessary positions. The only a fraction of the total reactants are converted to other forms, and therefore the energy available is reduced. Alternately, is the battery is discharged at a very slow rate using a low current, more energy can be extracted from the battery and the battery capacity is higher. Therefore, the battery of capacity should include the charging/discharging rate. A common way of specifying battery capacity is to provide the battery capacity as a function of the time in which it takes to fully discharge the battery (note that in practice the battery often cannot be fully discharged). The notation to specify battery capacity in this way is written as Cx, where x is the time in hours that it takes to discharge the battery. In the above table, C10 = xxx (also written as C10 = xxx) means that the battery capacity is xxx when the battery is discharged in 10 hours.
Temperature

The temperature of a battery will also affect the energy that can be extracted from it. At higher temperatures, the battery capacity is typically higher than at lower temperatures. However, intentionally elevating battery temperature is not an effective method to increase battery capacity as this also decreases battery lifetime.
Age and history of battery

The age and history of the battery have a major impact on the capacity of a battery. Even when following manufacturers specifications on DOD, the battery capacity will stay at or close to its rated capacity for a limited number of charge/discharge cycles. The history of the battery has an additional impact on capacity in that if the battery has been taken below its maximum DOD, then battery capacity may be prematurely reduced and the rated number of charge/discharge cycles may not be available.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Pre voltage on the 6 month old battery was 12.57 before swap.
I didnt get a pre-voltage test on the old battery on the first ride of the day, but after it was ridden it read 12.55.
So I let it sit for 40 hours-- this morning it read 12.34 volts.
Charging these batteries has always been with a .75 amp battery tender. The mottobatt instructions say a conventional style trickle charge is whats called for.
i will let it sit for another day or 2 and get another reading. If it keeps dropping i would guess it's on its way out.
The older battery did 4 years worth of snowplowing/ winching. After every plow session the battery tender was plugged in. My guess is that the quad is fussy about voltage and the other quads isn't as much. If the other quad starts flashing volt, its new battery time.
In the past, it takes a charge in short order. less than an hour.

Good info above^^^
 

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What kind of battery tender did you use?
 

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The 14.6 charge rate with old battery (more than likely) is a sign of a charging system working a little harder than it really should..... Between that and a slight possibility of a difference in amperage output from machine for plowing may be why it was sensing something and tripping the voltage signal....

A well charged batt Pre-start SHOULD (ideally) show 12.65-12.75 unless in frigid temps such as winter... FWIW (just sayin'.....)

Thats pretty much a std of powersports repair info throughout the industry over the years that I've noted... Also spoke with a friend (MEMBER: billme1's father) who's run a very successful auto repair shop for close to 40 yrs now and he pretty much said its the same scale of standards there as well...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
this charger:Deltran Battery Tender Jr 021 0123 Trickle Charger 12 Volt 75 0 75 Amp New | eBay

This morning before work it read 12.34 again.
tomorrow I'm going to test all the batteries/ running/not running/ then maybe bring both to the auto store to get tested?
Seems like the volt message started 2 years ago when we were pulling a fertilizer spreader at slow speeds for about 20 minutes.
Figured it was because it wasnt charged or used for a few weeks ( like most Cat quads with the digital voltage sucking clock)
Charged it up and it was fine.
This year, pulling a drag at a higher rate of speed caused the volt to appear. Again charged it up and it seemed fine again. Now it shows volt when its run at normal riding speeds..ie. 25 to 35 mph. I can shut off the quad, restart and it will be fine for a few minutes. It is more frequent than before.
I think I own one fussy quad.
 

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If it is the "same quad" showing this with EITHER battery installed, something is not correct within the charging system... Possibly something as simple as perhaps 1 wire somewhere not having a true 100% good CONSISTENT connection at all times... Sometimes that is all it takes to throw something of a "Gremlin" such as this at a person to test their whit....
Again... That's IF this is same quad first mentioned with either battery...
 

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Almost forgot... The 12.34 is IMHO ridiculously LOW....

Jftr: IMHO any battery tender under 1.25 amps is a waste of time.... Reason?, HEAT being cycled through the lead plates within the battery IS WHAT keeps "Sulfation" from forming on the lead and doing to lead, the same as rust does to both steel and iron... (Erodes), thereby losing "storage capacity" for the voltage provided by the amperage input...

More consistent starting and running (where charging system's input), along with startings "withdrawal" of amperage keeps the plates their warmest WHEN done on a more regular basis of time.... That's why your car/truck/van, etc., etc., etc., all have a more longer battery life than ATV's seem to.....
They are "cycled through" the withdrawal and replenishing (charging) more often and therefore fight "Sulfation" and it's life robbing tendencies....
Tigg... I teched in motorcycle industry for a good portion of my career.. Noting how much (and often) customers rode their bikes went hand in hand with supporting the afore mentioned... The more they rode their machines, the longer the battery life..
The less they rode it.. Well, I think you get the point (I'd be selling them a new battery to replace the clearly "Sulfated" one every spring or summer...)
My bikes original went nearly 6 years ('82-late '87).. And replacement one was still doing fine when I sold it, because I rode it whenever possible, even during the winter when roads were clear...

I guess I'm saying to use a more powerful tender if you're gonna use one at all... No sense in only going along at idle when the true amperage influx begins at 1/8 throttle (so to speak)... ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Tested all week long.
All 3 read 12.34 to 12.55 while sitting.
All 3 read 14.85--to-- 14.95 while idling.
The 07 with the newest battery flashed "VOLT" again yesterday on a slow drive around the house. We shut it off, re-started (12.58 volts in off position) and took off down the road at a higher speed. 2 minutes later "VOLT" appeared again. There are no codes.
I cleaned all the battery connections and di-lectric greezed them all.
We started the quad and let it idle for 15 minutes, (14.90) and volt did not show up again.
It had to be a loose connection or a dirty connection. I've eliminated the battery and the charging system by comparing them all. The connections looked like brand new, no corrosion but maybe a tad loose.
Motobatt batteries use a small allen head screw and the hex part was somewhat striped. I''l replace them all with a hex head bolt/screw.
Keeping my fingers crossed.
Cat happy
 

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Discussion Starter #13
It's baaaaaaaack
Volt reared it ugly head again yesterday after a 40 minute ride.
Pulling back into the garage it decided to flash again. After that I switched the ECU with the other 07 700 and went for another ride. So far no volt flashing. I'm just gonna keep swapping parts till i get it figured out and get it to flash volt on the other quad.
When it flashed volt this time, I checked voltage as soon as I shut it off. 13.05,,,then started it up--14.85 and revved the motor for a full minute.. it stayed perfect at 14.85 volts, never wavered a bit.
dam thing is driving me crazy.
Maybe I'll fix it with a for sale sign.
 

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I had the same thing happen to my 07 700 and it was the gauge. Replaced it and have not got the Volt since. I checked everything
like you are doing and everything checked out OK. I plugged the
new gauge in first and everything came up OK plugged the old one
back in and got the volt deal again. Hope this helps it was drivin
me crazy with everything checking out OK. Oh one last I thought
I had it fixed many times also would run for a while but the volt would pop back up again.
I tried different batteries and new ones that were good yet still get the volt thing. I put the gauge in
and my old battery worked fine and still no volt. Now have the Odyssey in that I bought to
fix the problem. LOL


CW
 

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Discussion Starter #15
How much did you shell out for a new gauge?
I can swap it with our other 07, maybe the other quad might "like it' better??
It puts out the same juice as the other quads, so I was thinking a loose plug or something in the notorious wiring harness.
Pod swap today for sure.
 

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How much did you shell out for a new gauge?
I can swap it with our other 07, maybe the other quad might "like it' better??
It puts out the same juice as the other quads, so I was thinking a loose plug or something in the notorious wiring harness.
Pod swap today for sure.
Since you mentioned the harness I remember I had issues with that also. The harness actually broke the pin off. The pin was the one
in your looking at it the one furthest to right on the top row.

I got mine out of the parts bin at Arctic for 50 bucks. One of my clients was an OEM to them.

If it's not the gauge when you swap them out check the voltage
regulator. I read some place that fixed it.

CW
 

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Discussion Starter #17
It showed up again today, It isnt the ECU.
The voltage regulator was too hot to touch, I mean melt your finger
prints off hot. So thats the next flip-flop-- once it cools down.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I'm hoping its bad and that solves the problem.
Swapping it later today to find out.
 

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Lmk bc mine felt hot yesterday and I had been been having fuel pump issues but that was due to moisture in my fuse box...i dried it out and all works fine now but I k noticed my regulator was warm/hot but not burn your fingers hot
 
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