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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone put a 1.5 inch lug track on a TZ1 LXR 1100? I want to upgrade my track but going to the 1.25 lug like the turbo uses just does not seem like a big enough difference.
 

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TZ1 LXR 1100 Track Options
Has anyone put a 1.5 inch lug track on a TZ1 LXR 1100? I want to upgrade my track but going to the 1.25 lug like the turbo uses just does not seem like a big enough difference.
I have a 2008 TZ1 LXR and just installed a 1.5 Camoplast Crossover track (part # 2602-350) last month from Countrycat.net and so far it works great! Way better traction than the Hacksaw it had on it, which might be good in some other parts of the country, but for the powder out here in Utah I needed just a bit more. The only clearance concerns I had were up at the front with the cooling lines but it ended up being fine. Country Cat told me that the Z1, TZ1, and some other sleds were all the same from a tunnel clearance so I went for it and don't regret it.

When we go out as a family I have two M series sleds that my kids ride and I just cart my wife around on the TZ1. I don't intend to make it a mountain sled, but with the taller lugs we can get off trail more without any concerns.

I also just bought a set of the Simmons Gen II skis which I'm hoping will help the front float better now, but I have yet to try them and won't get to now until next season.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well I just purchased the 1.5" lug track for my 1100 TZ1 LXR and also purchased the tech manual. I have had the suspension out of a few machines in the past but never changed a track. Any comments on how hard that is to do yourself?
Peter
 

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Well I just purchased the 1.5" lug track for my 1100 TZ1 LXR and also purchased the tech manual. I have had the suspension out of a few machines in the past but never changed a track. Any comments on how hard that is to do yourself?
Peter
I did it twice unfortunately and it wasn't too difficult, but it is easier to remove the drive shaft for sure. The first time I was fighting it pretty hard because I didn't disconnect the drive shaft from the brake disc. I unbolted the brake assembly and part of the battery cage, and then lifted the back high enough to slide the track across the shaft diagonally. When I put the slide rail assembly back in I didn't notice the rear shock mount became inverted, which chewed up some of the drive lugs, so definitely watch out for that!

The second time (I had to buy another track because of the damage) I got the tool and a new shaft nut, and just pulled the whole drive shaft. That was much easier. I replaced some other parts (mostly idler wheel bearings) and popped it all back together and it runs great now.

I've been out a few times already this season, and I notice I flip up more snow even on some iced over hard pack which keeps my engine running cool. I'll also report that the Simmon's Gen 2 Skis are amazing. I got into 2 feet of very soft early season powder, and even with my wife on the back we climbed just about anything I wanted. The front floats way better, and with the added track lug height the traction is just right for chasing my kids who ride M-Series sleds.

Good luck! Let me know if you have any other questions. I can certainly post pictures too if that will help.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I did it twice unfortunately and it wasn't too difficult, but it is easier to remove the drive shaft for sure. The first time I was fighting it pretty hard because I didn't disconnect the drive shaft from the brake disc. I unbolted the brake assembly and part of the battery cage, and then lifted the back high enough to slide the track across the shaft diagonally. When I put the slide rail assembly back in I didn't notice the rear shock mount became inverted, which chewed up some of the drive lugs, so definitely watch out for that!

The second time (I had to buy another track because of the damage) I got the tool and a new shaft nut, and just pulled the whole drive shaft. That was much easier. I replaced some other parts (mostly idler wheel bearings) and popped it all back together and it runs great now.

I've been out a few times already this season, and I notice I flip up more snow even on some iced over hard pack which keeps my engine running cool. I'll also report that the Simmon's Gen 2 Skis are amazing. I got into 2 feet of very soft early season powder, and even with my wife on the back we climbed just about anything I wanted. The front floats way better, and with the added track lug height the traction is just right for chasing my kids who ride M-Series sleds.

Good luck! Let me know if you have any other questions. I can certainly post pictures too if that will help.
Thanks for the reply. I was at the dealer today and was told that the upgrade to the 1.5" lug track makes a huge difference; which backs up your comments and makes me more comfortable with spending the money to change the track. Just wondering what tool you are referring to? Also, is changing the shaft nut a requirement or did you do it as a precaution?
Peter
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Also, I would love to see some pictures. Do you have a picture of the problem that damaged your track?
 

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Thanks for the reply. I was at the dealer today and was told that the upgrade to the 1.5" lug track makes a huge difference; which backs up your comments and makes me more comfortable with spending the money to change the track. Just wondering what tool you are referring to? Also, is changing the shaft nut a requirement or did you do it as a precaution?
Peter
I'll try and post some pictures later today. The tool I'm referring to is the one that removes the nut on the disc brake side of the shaft. The nut is shaped like an "X" so you need a special tool to get it off and to tighten the new one (I can't remember the specs but I thought it was over 120 ft-lbs. From what I read in the manual as well as online the nut is not supposed to be reused because you actually punch it down into a notch on the shaft once tightened.
 

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Thanks for the reply. I was at the dealer today and was told that the upgrade to the 1.5" lug track makes a huge difference; which backs up your comments and makes me more comfortable with spending the money to change the track. Just wondering what tool you are referring to? Also, is changing the shaft nut a requirement or did you do it as a precaution?
Peter
You don't have to replace the nut unless you destroy it taking it off. If you go to a good Auto Parts store and buy i socket for the axle nut for a four wheel drive truck. I don't remember the size but you can measure your nut. Basically a tube with four nubs. I have two of the dam things as I bought one for working on a truck and another forgetting I had one......
 

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Also, I would love to see some pictures. Do you have a picture of the problem that damaged your track?
So I am attaching several pictures that should help you...

1 - Shows the shock mount that can be inverted accidentally (sorry mine is covered from a recent ride), but note that the shock mount is on TOP of the idler wheels.
2 - Shows the damage I did to the first track where the bolts that connect the top of the shock pivot and the rear shock links was tearing up the inner most drive lugs.
3 - This is from the manual and I highlighted the key parts in blue showing that you need to peen the retaining nut and tightened to 120 ft-lbs.
4 - Just gives you the exact location (on a 2008) of the Inside Idler Wheel Mounting Hole so you know where I'm referring.
5 - This excerpt from the manual kind of shows what I'm talking about where the green circle has the shock above the axle and the red circle with the X shows it below, which is what I didn't realize when I put it back in (I hadn't even disassembled it). The red arrow is the shock mount that bent when the shock was compressed.

Basically, when you pull the slide rail assembly and install it again just make sure the shock is mounted above the axle and you will be fine. I hope that helps!
 

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You don't have to replace the nut unless you destroy it taking it off. If you go to a good Auto Parts store and buy i socket for the axle nut for a four wheel drive truck. I don't remember the size but you can measure your nut. Basically a tube with four nubs. I have two of the dam things as I bought one for working on a truck and another forgetting I had one......
This is what I bought as I wasn't able to get one from the local auto stores.

Arctic Cat Snowmobile Brake Retaining Nut Socket - 2007 & Newer ACT Models - 0644-481

It sounds like I could have used the nut again, but for less than $8 and considering what it held together I didn't want to risk it.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Wow! I cannot thank you guys enough. Especially you Sledhead70. I really appreciate you giving me this info. It will certainly help. I will let you know how I make out with the track swap.
Peter
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Another question. Do you know if you can you stud this track (1.5 Camoplast Crossover track part # 2602-350)? If yes would I need a tunnel protector of some sort?
Peter
 

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Another question. Do you know if you can you stud this track (1.5 Camoplast Crossover track part # 2602-350)? If yes would I need a tunnel protector of some sort?
Peter
Unfortunately I have no idea. Where I live (Utah) we don't use studs, and I've never personally used them either. Perhaps someone else from this forum can answer this for you. Sorry.

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks Bill,
There seems to be plenty of stud application guides on line for snow machines with stock tracks. Can't seem to fine anything for aftermarket tracks. I guess I will check with the dealer.

I was out for my first ride today. We have had a rather freakish December as far as snow goes. We have at least 3 feet of pure powder snow right now. That would be closer to mid January snow levels for us (I am in Newfoundland) and we normally have a mild period or two to settle or compact the snow down; not so this year. Could have used the 1.5" lug track today but I suspect it will be several more weeks before I receive it.
Peter
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Bill,
Just reading through the tech manual and in the instructions to remove the drive shaft step 12 says "using the rear spring suspension tool, remove the spring from the adjusting cam." I looked up the rear spring suspension tool and can see it is a T-shaped tool that seems to be used to remove a spring from the slide suspension. Is this step necessary. If I m taking the entire slide out why would I need to mess with any of the springs?
Peter
 

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Bill,
Just reading through the tech manual and in the instructions to remove the drive shaft step 12 says "using the rear spring suspension tool, remove the spring from the adjusting cam." I looked up the rear spring suspension tool and can see it is a T-shaped tool that seems to be used to remove a spring from the slide suspension. Is this step necessary. If I m taking the entire slide out why would I need to mess with any of the springs?
Peter
Sorry, I was out riding yesterday. My shop manual must be a little different, but I think I found what you are referring to. Step 7 on page 6-37.

I actually disconnected each of the springs at the other end (the longer end that points forward). I had my back end hoisted way up, loosened the bolt (I think it's 10mm on the one side and 13mm on the other), and once I had the nut off I just carefully used enough force to pull the springs out and down to release the tension. With the spring tension removed the skid frame collapses very nicely to get it out.

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Perhaps our manuals are different; I was referring to step 12 on Page 6-15 of my manual. Nevertheless you did answer my question. I believe what the manual is saying is that the spring tension has to be released in order to remove the slide suspension. Up to this point I wasn't understanding that to be the case. I have removed the slide suspension on a couple of other machines and didn't have to release the spring tension to remove the slide.
Peter
 

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You don't need to release the spring tension, but it is a hell of a lot easier. Goes in a bunch easier with spring pressure off too.
 

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You don't need to release the spring tension, but it is a hell of a lot easier. Goes in a bunch easier with spring pressure off too.

????by far much easer with loose springs. Will fight you all the way. Just be careful re-installing.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Ok I need a little help. I am in the process of changing my track on my 2012 TZ1 LXR and I have the skid frame removed. I have the drive shaft retaining nut removed and I had the cap screw connecting the drive shaft to the gear box removed. I have a tech manual and from what I can understand at this point I should be able to slide the drive shaft toward the gear box enough to allow it to fall out of the brake disk housing. But I cannot get the bugger to move; in any direction. Do I have to use more force or do I have to remove the brake disk housing. Any and all comments welcome.
Thanks
Peter
 
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