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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I'm finally able to take the cat out today and I go to make a u-turn and proceed to dig in until I hear a thunk. I got off and looked to find a rock wedged between the track& wheel right under the gas tank. After some well placed kicks& 4 letter words I was able to free the rock but I could not get the track to turn at all even at full throttle. I've noticed that this happens after the sled sits for awhile and moving it sideways seems to help but I could not get the track to spin so I had to abandon the sled and I'm going back for it in the morning.

Any ideas on how to get the track unstuck?

Also the cord for my recoil start is going, can I replace it with one from something else or is it specific to this model?

1972 Panther 292

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Figured it out after having to lug 50lbs of tools 1 mile UP the hill, hill is an understatement, to where it was. I figured out that the rock made the track move all the way over to the metal on the right and by loosening one of the wheels in the back you can relocate the track w/a pry-bar. Working good now. I'm just amazed at how simply this thing is built!
 

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that happens from time to time its called a track derail. Can happen also too loose a track taking a turn with the right bump. Sometimes it will rerail itself if you can pick the rear end up and gas it a bit but most of the time you have to do what you did loosen the rear wheel up then gas it a bit. The thing is not to use too much gas if the track dosnt turn it will burn a spot on the belt dosnt hurt it that much. But will make a clunk or vibration when going over that spot. You can get a wire brush and scrub it out if it is doing that
 

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Check track alignment and check out the drive cogs to see if you are losing teeth. These old cleat drive track cogs go bad after 25 years of sitting around. Cheap test for this is to jack up the sled, clean out the track, and shine a bright light through the back of the urethane cog. Missing teeth are obvious but the potential for a big failure will show up as cracks in the urethane. The white cogs are no longer made but the improved black replacements are still out there. The track tension is a simple matter of adjusting the back tension screws that you stumbled onto so the track runs square on the rails. Proper tension is about 1 and 1/2 inches of free hang in the center without pressing on it,as measured from the center of the slide rail. Your drive bearings may also be shot. The 292 Kawasaki single requires it's own recoil as I think the rig is larger than the twins of that era. Go find a dead 292 Lynx and scavenge one.
 
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