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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do we have step by step instructions with pictures on how this works? I know its in the online manual but maybe we should get some pictures going and the put it in the pinned section.
I've searched and cant find it but I believe we already have a good topic on this already.
Just as a shortcut.
 

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Do we have step by step instructions with pictures on how this works? I know its in the online manual but maybe we should get some pictures going and the put it in the pinned section.
I've searched and cant find it but I believe we already have a good topic on this already.
Just as a shortcut.
Here is how you do it.

Key off
Insert Jumper pin in the Diagnostic plug
Loosen the Throttle Position sensor retaining Screws
Key on
Adjust the Throttle position sensor until the mark on the pod
is centered, do this by rotating the sensor on the throttle
valve body
Tighten the TPS retaining screws
Key off
Remove the Jumper pin

After doing this you should also set the Idle Speed Control EDIT: on some models it isnt necessary to install the Dia.Plug (09 700 H1 and others) steps 3 thru 6 only.....It wont hurt to try it both ways, I did and it worked w/o the plug installed, I had a high idle and this fixed it. edited by tiggershark
1. Key off
2. Insert the jumper pin in the Diagnostic plug
3. Hold the Throttle wide open
4. Key on
5. Hold throttle for 10 to 15 seconds
6. key off
remove the diagnostic pin.

Engine should run better now.

JERRY
 

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I have read on highlifter this only works up to 2010 or 2011 not sure. You could fry your pod/ECU on newer models. This may be incorrect but I would double check before trying on the newer models
 

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It worked on my 2012 700H1 TRV when I was having issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah, I've done it numerous times. I was thinking of adding pictures of the whole proceedure for the newbies.
Do's and dont's and the idle speed contol process as well, on the models that it applies to.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
add pictures anytime
 
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I thought the service manual specific for your model and year has the correct procedure for your ATV and does include some pictures. At least I though the procedure listed for my 08 Tcat was quite detailed and clear enough and covered what the owner or mechanic needs to know and watch-out for. Figured other model years are as well written??? Maybe not?

The correct procedure to use did change on some models years. So if in doubt and to be safe read the service manual first BEFORE trying any of the user posted instructions on this forum if you do not own the same model and year.
 

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:Bangin:

My post on this subject was for the machine in question, which
was the 700 H1 owned by Tiggershark (as listed in his profile)
The next time I answer someones question I will check with
my lawyer to see if I have covered all the bases and disclaimers.
 

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Okay what does the above procedure do? Supposed to do? I'm trying to read all I can on here to learn about tricks and mods for the TCat. Throttle position sensor adjust helps your machine idle better? Anyway I need to go find a service manual and read.

Thanks
 

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Okay what does the above procedure do? Supposed to do? I'm trying to read all I can on here to learn about tricks and mods for the TCat. Throttle position sensor adjust helps your machine idle better? Anyway I need to go find a service manual and read.

Thanks
The sensor tells the ECU how far the throttle is open from idle to wide open. Once the ECU has this information along with RPM, Manifold air pressure, Inlet temperature of the inlet air, and Engine temperature, it then can calculate how much fuel to inject for any amount of engine RPM and amount of throttle opening. If any of the sensors are giving the ECU bad information it may affect how the ATV starts and runs. If a sensors output is off far enough it may or should set a error code. However any EFI sensor can be giving a signal that is not optimum and can result is less than ideal fuel mix but not bad enough to set an error code too. Checking the sensors performance is the only way to know is they are performing at their peak. Only the TPS is adjustable, the others would require replacement if found further off then they should be.

If any of the sensors are giving the ECU false or bad values it can results in lower power, fouled plugs and maybe error codes or just poor running and/or starting. Setting and checking the throttle position sensor is just one more thing to eliminate if having problems and ensures your ATV is running the best it can get. In my opinion the throttle position sensor adjustment isn't something that needs to be done often or at all even if it was adjusted correctly at the factory in the first place. My 08 Tcat wasn't adjusted right from the factory and since I adjusted it I've never had to re-adjust in 5 years since when I've rechecked it. IT is one of the first things i check on a ATV that has issues and I probably recheck mine and the other sensors as well maybe yearly just to make sure they are up performing properly. Others have had to readjust their TPS once in a while. Maybe I'm just lucky?

When you adjust it if it require it, it doesn't need to move very much, A tiny bit of rotation one way or the other can make a big difference, so persistence pays off

The jetting 101 thread in the pinned section has some information on EFI systems. You'll find it in a separate post in the same 101 thread. don;t get alarmed that some of it is based on the Harley Davidson fuel injection systems. Not a problem really since the EFI systems on Cats are basically the same in how they operate and work the same way. Having an understanding of the basics of fuel injection sure helps a person out when there are issues and EFI trouble shooting in my opinion. for a service manual see the second Green word in my signature "Manuals"
 
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:Bangin:

My post on this subject was for the machine in question, which
was the 700 H1 owned by Tigershark (as listed in his profile)
The next time I answer someones question I will check with
my lawyer to see if I have covered all the bases and disclaimers.
Believe me Quadman. I didn't mean to step on your toes, I'm Sorry and I apologize if you thought I did. That wasn't my intent. Your procedure is very good and very clear, better than the service manual even, since it written well. Admittedly it makes it easier to understand and follow. My concern and post was just to give a heads up that the correct procedure for anybody else may not be identical to Tiggershark's 700 on different machines or different year. Following a well written but wrong procedure can let the smoke out of, or in clearer form Destroy that expensive black box we all know as the ECU. If you've ever smoked an ECU you'll be very surprised how much smoke they pack into that little black box when they make it. <grin> Once again Sorry QMan.
 

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This might be an older thread, but in doing the research I've discovered a bit of new info. ArcticCat no longer makes the "test plug(0444-216)" that is specified in the 2013 550-1000 service manual to accomplish this procedure(adjust the TPS). On both the AC parts page and the CountryCat parts page they say that the Diagnostic Harness, pn: 0486-219 is the substitute. This is the same harness that is used to read codes and accomplish the clear codes procedure. 2 separate procedures using 2 separate maintenance parts with 1 no longer made was very confusing to me, because CC techs said the tps adjustment could be performed but never said HOW to get into the TPS adjustment screen. :Bangin: So this is where I say DUHHHH.. cause the TPS adjustment screen and the code display screen with the diag harness (or jumper) installed is one in the same. The "A", "B" and "C" bars appear to the left of the code alphanumeric's.

The diagnostics plug, located under the seat (pic attached) is this:
And the rest of this is copy/paste from pg 2 of the pinned how to read code thread from years ago. Amazing...Not worthy: still great info!

X0
00
XX <- Jumper these two together to read EFI codes, set throttle position sensor or to set Throttle range. You jumper the same two wires to read and clear EFI Stored or Active Codes ACXX ECXX,or SCXX where xx is some number representing some EFI or sensor fault. Code tables are in the service manual and is often posted in other threads on this site. The pinned section has a service manual that you can download if you do not have one. I recommend you get a service manual for your ATV model and year just in case the code table is different or procedures have changed.

There is also a little horizontal bar that is displayed. Left of the ACXX. This bar jumps up or down to one of 3 positions as the throttle is moved. It should light up in the center position when the throttle position sensor correctly is set while applying no throttle. To Set the Throttle position sensor, First make sure the battery is fully charged loosen the screws holding the sensor to the throttle body and rotate the sensor left or right until the bar shows in the center position while applying no throttle. (Very tiny amount of movement needed) Then tighten the screws making sure the bar stays centered. Always re-set throttle range after doing this so the ECU knows how much signal from the position sensor represents full throttle.

This is done by, jumping the diagnostic plug wires under the seat to put the ECU in diagnostic mode. Then with the key off press the throttle wide open and hold it, turn the key on wait at least 10 to 15 seconds, turn the key off. Then release the throttle. This sets idle speed and Calibrates the ECU to the trottle range sensor so it knows what the throttle position is and what the range is. Necessary for the ECU to be able to deliver the correct amount of fuel at various amounts of throttle opening. It also sets the idle speed control motor so the engine idles at the correct speed.

If there are any Active Codes there should be EFI on the pod display. I'm pretty sure (least what I've convinced myself) SC codes don't trigger the EFI on the display but must be cleared to get the ECU to back to full normal operation. So if you've ever seen a EFI on the pod then later disappears it's probably set a SC code that needs to be cleared. To read codes install the jumper and turn on the ignition switch but not started. All clear should show EC00 or AC00 on the pod. Anything else is ECU fault or a sensor failure somewhere. SC codes are historical AC codes that are no longer active. To clear all codes install diagnostic jumper and press and hold the reverse override switch as you turn the key on, wait 10-15 seconds and then turn key off. Remove jumper and run the engine until fully warmed up. Then check the codes again if everything is good it should show an EC00 (maybe AC00 on some) Anything else you still have problems that need to be tracked down. I've made it a routine to periodically check for EFI codes, check the throttle position sensor and reset the throttle range as preventive maintenance
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
This adjustment is for ATV's not sleds.
 
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