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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We just got our boondocker boxes and were getting ready to add them to our F1000's. I had my Y-Pipe and Intake on my sled, but still have zero miles and we are leaving for our first trip in a few hours. Speedwerx provided some base line setting information. But as we pulled the sleds into the garage we said you know what....it isn't worth it. So everything came off and we are going to keep them stock.

Happy riding if you have some snow.

Next thing we have to try and come up with is a carbuerator conversion kit for these sleds, because that is the best set up when you want to mod...


Anyone want to by a installed but never used Y-Pipe and Intake for an F1000, actually 3 of each are now available....
 

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"Carburator conversion". LOL based on what? Boondocher is a simple plus or minus to tune. Maybe think about coverting to wooden skis as well.
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (Mike C @ Jan 19 2007, 02:52 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
We just got our boondocker boxes and were getting ready to add them to our F1000's. I had my Y-Pipe and Intake on my sled, but still have zero miles and we are leaving for our first trip in a few hours. Speedwerx provided some base line setting information. But as we pulled the sleds into the garage we said you know what....it isn't worth it. So everything came off and we are going to keep them stock.

Happy riding if you have some snow.

Next thing we have to try and come up with is a carbuerator conversion kit for these sleds, because that is the best set up when you want to mod...


Anyone want to by a installed but never used Y-Pipe and Intake for an F1000, actually 3 of each are now available....[/b]

I sure hope yours run better than mine on top end because if they don't your going to be in for a real dissappointment. Keep the y pipes and boondockers your going to need them!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (Tom F7 @ Jan 19 2007, 05:59 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (Mike C @ Jan 19 2007, 02:52 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
We just got our boondocker boxes and were getting ready to add them to our F1000's. I had my Y-Pipe and Intake on my sled, but still have zero miles and we are leaving for our first trip in a few hours. Speedwerx provided some base line setting information. But as we pulled the sleds into the garage we said you know what....it isn't worth it. So everything came off and we are going to keep them stock.

Happy riding if you have some snow.

Next thing we have to try and come up with is a carbuerator conversion kit for these sleds, because that is the best set up when you want to mod...


Anyone want to by a installed but never used Y-Pipe and Intake for an F1000, actually 3 of each are now available....[/b]

I sure hope yours run better than mine on top end because if they don't your going to be in for a real dissappointment. Keep the y pipes and boondockers your going to need them!
[/b][/quote]

You better have your sled checked. We were hitting 95 easy in the trails in short bursts, and I am still running double oil. Have you played with your clutches at all? We tuned ours a little. I can't wait to see what this does on a lake.
 

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Mike what are you doing to your clutches to get 95mph in short bursts on the trail? Best I could get was 75-80 in the short burst(I know what you mean "short burst"). I'm not real familiar with the DD or the four tower primary
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (f1pete @ Jan 21 2007, 07:28 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
Mike what are you doing to your clutches to get 95mph in short bursts on the trail? Best I could get was 75-80 in the short burst(I know what you mean "short burst"). I'm not real familiar with the DD or the four tower primary[/b]

I have to be honest, my brother is my sled mechanic, so he did the work and I just trust him. I know he changed the weights and the spring. He also said I need to replace the helix to make it a little smoother. I still think we can get more out of it as my rpms were maxing out around 7400, as best I can tell visually.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (looneytune @ Jan 19 2007, 04:24 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
Mike, keep the Boondockers on the sleds, way easier to tune than carbs.[/b]

Hey Looney. In our experience we haven't had good luck with the boxes. First their was last year with Franks F8 Saber. This year th first box that we got for the '07 F8 was cracked so that had to go back. Then we got ours for the F1000. Chris hooked it up, started the sled and the sled would flood with zero's on the settings and kept getting injector error. Disconnected got the sled running tried it again, same thing kept dumping fuel. So that has to go back, my box seemed ok, but I honestly just don't feel like messing with it. I am sure if you have the patience (and a boreascope) you could play with the settings, read your plugs, check the piston wash and dial in a nice trail map and a race map or two. But with only being able to get out and ride 5 or 6 weekends a year, I would rather spend my time putting on miles than dialing in.

I can always get a box another day if someone works out all the maps and proves out the pipe and intake. It does make a difference no doubt according to Chris, he can really tell the difference without them.

Chris likes playing with the carbs more than the EFI. His point was that top fuel dragsters are not EFI, they are carbed. To each his own.

"Wooden Skis" that Royster is a funny guy. :tongue_nana:
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (Mike C @ Jan 21 2007, 10:05 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (looneytune @ Jan 19 2007, 04:24 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Mike, keep the Boondockers on the sleds, way easier to tune than carbs.[/b]

Hey Looney.....................................
...................Chris likes playing with the carbs more than the EFI. His point was that top fuel dragsters are not EFI, they are carbed. To each his own.

"Wooden Skis" that Royster is a funny guy. :tongue_nana:
[/b][/quote]
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (f1pete @ Jan 21 2007, 07:28 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
Mike what are you doing to your clutches to get 95mph in short bursts on the trail? Best I could get was 75-80 in the short burst(I know what you mean "short burst"). I'm not real familiar with the DD or the four tower primary[/b]
adjustable weights spec'd, and we just got our helix's back in.. so I am sure they will have them soon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (bodd @ Jan 21 2007, 04:23 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (Mike C @ Jan 21 2007, 10:05 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (looneytune @ Jan 19 2007, 04:24 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Mike, keep the Boondockers on the sleds, way easier to tune than carbs.[/b]

Hey Looney.....................................
...................Chris likes playing with the carbs more than the EFI. His point was that top fuel dragsters are not EFI, they are carbed. To each his own.

"Wooden Skis" that Royster is a funny guy. :tongue_nana:
[/b][/quote]
[/b][/quote]


Exactly. This engine is not controlled via EFI. It is controlled by a mehanical fuel pump and a blower driven off of the engine not an ECU.

The engine of a Top Fuel-dragster is derived from Chryslers legendary 426 Hemi even though now parts remain from the original one. That means it’s a 90° V8-engine with low mounted camshaft, push rods and two valves per cylinder. The volume is limited by the rules to a maximum of 500 cubic-inches, that is 8,19 liters, The power output is amazing, about 6000 horsepower, or more, if needed!

The thing making a Top Fuel different from other kinds of engines is the fuel. Instead of gasoline nitromethane is used (CH3NO2). Most people know that gasoline requires a certain amount of fuel to make an effective combustion. Nitromethane, on the other hand, has two atoms of oxygen in itself per molecule and that gives the possibility to feed the engine with enormous amounts of fuel. As a matter of fact Nitromethane has lower value of energy than gasoline, but the fact of the oxygen compensates it and more. The nitro is mixed with methanol, starting at 94% and is enriched at higher atmospherically pressure.

The massive fuel amount is best visualized by telling that a Top Fuel heaves in 10 liters nitro every minute when it’s idling. When the driver puts the pedal down the amount is up to 3,5 liters a SECOND going into the engine! Two mechanical pumps flowing 220-235 liters per minute each feed the fuel. After them a pneumatically controlled valve adjusts the flow back to the tank. The harder the clutch is locked, the more fuel is fed to the engine through limiting the flow back.

All fuel isn’t added at the same place. Among other things, to get a possibility to control the temperature in the blower and intake manifold about 20% of the fuel is fed in the injector and 20% into the intake. The rest of the fuel is shot down the intake channel just above the intake valve.

To get the largest possible amount of air, for the oxygen, into the engine it is force fed by a blower. The blower is similar to a turbo but it’s mechanically turned directly from the crankshaft and revolves about 30-40% faster than the engine. The compression is done by means of two spiral twisted rotors going in opposite directions. Screwtype blowers are not permitted in the regulations.

On top of the blower the injector is mounted with the throttle valve area maximized to 65 square inches. A slot of only 0,3mm at the throttle valve, but the high flow speed may cause icing of the slot and that decreases the opening. When that happens the crew chief can pull out plastic parts from the injector to keep the idle rev up. One plug gives an addition of about 50-rpm. The idle rev is usually set at about 2600-rpm. If the rpm is to high the centrifugal clutch starts to pull and it is impossible for the driver to keep the car standing on the starting line anymore.

Massive ignition systems are used to bring life to these amounts of fuel. For a Top Fuel engine magnetic ignition is used, two separate systems with a gigantic ignition coil each and two spark plugs per cylinder. Since nitromethane burns slowly the timing is set to 50-60 degrees before TDC. The nitromethanes long burntime is what’s responsible for the high flames coming out of the exhaust pipes when driving. The fuel hasn’t finished burning and is pumped out flaming.

Choked cylinders are an enormous problem. If the combustion decreases in one cylinder and don’t get the speed up again some of the unburned fuel will be unable to get out through the exhaust valve. After a few strokes the cylinder will contain more fuel than fits in the combustion chamber and the engine hydraulices. Since fluids can’t be compressed it has to go somewhere and that means something has to give in and then we have a major engine-blast. This is why the rules stipulate catch-belts and kevlar-carpets all around the engine to prevent the parts and fluids from flying all over the place.
 
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