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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1999 ZR 600 EFI, nice sled, only 1500 miles on it. I haven't put but 5 miles on it since I have got it. Just bought the thing and checked it over in the shop. It was a little boggy on the low end when I first got it, I siphoned out the old fuel and put fresh fuel in with sea foam to clean things up a bit. I pulled the fuel filters out and they were a little dirty, but no holes or anything. I replaced the air box boot and checked my throttle body and boots over. Everything looks fine, reed valves were fine. I took it out and ran it across a field and she absolutely screamed. Tons of power, really a fun zip. Pulled it back into the shed and looked at the plugs and they are a ghost grey/white. Both plugs are this same color. My ecu is not flashing anything and I am positive I don't have an air leak. My coolant bottle isn't being drained so I'm sure i'm not burning coolant. The only seal that I can think of would be the crankshaft seal, but this thing is in such good condition I couldn't see anything like that be out. I am going to look at my oil pump and see if it is properly synchronized with the throttle. I have no idea what kind of oil in is the oil tank, It's green like my 50-1 arctic cat injection oil. The odd part is when I first took off, I had plenty of blue exaust, but when I just started it a moment ago in the shop after the ride, there was no color to the exhaust. Is there anything else I should check or be concerned with. If it was just one plug that was white I would suspect a air leak, but if both plugs are white, could it be fuel delivery or oil pump? Thanks for your help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I checked my oil pump cable to see if it is synchronized and it is not, there is slack in it and the marks that are suppose to line up to ensure that it is synchronized are not close at all. So I will adjust the jam nuts and take it for a spin and then check the plugs again. If that doesn't solve it, then on to the next item.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Okay, I have no flashing ecu codes. So the tps apparently is not the issue, I adjust the oil pump cable, The only other thing from what I understand is my fuel pump. But when I removed the TB just a moment ago, there was no shortage of oil and gas mixure in the TB boots. So I dont know. I am going to put the sled back together and go for a run outside. Then pull it back in and check it. I did drain the old gas, check the fuel filters in the tank, and put in fresh gas and some sea foam when I first got it? When oil pumps fail, do they still emit a small amount of oil or do they just quit all together?
 

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they could just plain quit if it was me i would mark the oil bottle level and add som oil to the tank. no arctic cat does not recomend putting oil in the tank for the efi sleds i have done it befor and havent hurt anything after a rebuild. its just cheep insurance ud hate to burn it down. rip it around a bit and see if your oil level is for sure dropping
 

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If the tps isnt adjusted correctly the ecu wont flash codes unless tps isnt working at all

Sent from somewhere in MN
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Okay, again I checked and there is no flash code on the ecu. So as I just read the TPS could still be off even though there it is not flashing? What about fuel pumps? How often do they quit and when they do, do the just tank or do they limp along. My fuel filters in my tank looked okay, no holes, but were dirty, could that restrict fuel pressure? I have another EFI sled, perhaps I can take and swap the filters to see if there is a difference. Any other advice or suggestions?
 

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Okay, again I checked and there is no flash code on the ecu. So as I just read the TPS could still be off even though there it is not flashing? What about fuel pumps? How often do they quit and when they do, do the just tank or do they limp along. My fuel filters in my tank looked okay, no holes, but were dirty, could that restrict fuel pressure? I have another EFI sled, perhaps I can take and swap the filters to see if there is a difference. Any other advice or suggestions?
The only way to test for that is to do a fuel pressure test. You need to tee into the supply line to hook a fuel pressure gauge up and then run the fuel pump either by running the engine or supplying 12V dc to the pump. The connector for the pump is inside the console that goes around the steering post on top of the tank. The proper fuel pressure for that sled is 38 PSI.

If the TPS had been removed in the past it is likely that it wasn't put on right. The TPS has slotted holes so that it can be rotated slightly for adjustment. If it is rotated too far one way it will lean out the engine across the entire rpm range. Likewise if it is rotated too far the other way it will be too rich. Some people have just rotated it a little clockwise to richen it up and then run it, and tweak as necessary to get it right. The directions in the link in my signature tell how to do it with an ohm meter to get it to factory specs. With the turn and try it method you run the risk of being too lean and causing problems that way.

Also, I would do the fuel pressure test first to insure that the pump and fuel pressure regulator are working properly before messing with the TPS. You can get a fuel pressure tester at any auto parts store for about $40
 

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Use a process of elimination, Start with the easiest, cheapest to check and work from there. What I listed before is what came to mind considering you are sure its not an air leak. Most of what I listed other than fuel pressure only requires a multimeter to check. If you plan on doing any diagnosing on any EFI system a fuel pressure gauge is a must have. The only other thing that I can think of that may cause a lean condition is the altitude sensor which unfortunately is an integral part of the ECU and not separately replaceable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
If it was a bad fuel regulator, how would I know? I am going to test my fuel pressure today, can I have the fuel regulator hooked up when I do it to see if it flows through? If it were bad, it would not allow enough fuel to pass through? would some fuel spit out of the regulator nossle?
 

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If you have only put 5 miles on the sled since you got it and some of that was when you found it to be boggy before you worked on it - how many miles do you have on the plugs? After 15 miles you can just start to see colour come to a plug, after one or two I would expect them to show as white.
 

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If it was a bad fuel regulator, how would I know? I am going to test my fuel pressure today, can I have the fuel regulator hooked up when I do it to see if it flows through? If it were bad, it would not allow enough fuel to pass through? would some fuel spit out of the regulator nossle?
You will know when you do the fuel pressure test. The regulator is what maintains the constant 38 psi. You DO NOT remove the regulator for the fuel pressure test. What you do is tee into the supply side, the side opposite the regulator. That is where you connect the fuel pressure gauge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I called the local dealer, meanwhile I am try to get a hold of a fuel pressure gauge I can borrow for my test. But the dealer said that I could have partially stuck injectors, They said hook up a battery with some alligator clips and clip the connections, repeat until you hear them "pop" thus loosening the injectors and it should allow fuel flow. Anybody had an experience doing this before?
 

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I've never heard of them being stuck and then start working, but I've definitely seen them leak. Regardless, in that case you would likely have a no-start condition as opposed to lean. Can you post a pic of the plugs that concerned you? Large quantities of fuel additives will affect your plug readings as well. How does the machine start and run at the moment? You can check the piston wash also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
My plugs are a bright white, I have added a small amount of sea foam in the tank, 4 gallons of 89 to 1/4 pint of sea foam, the bottle says 1 pint treats 8 to 20 gallons. The sled has not been used much the last 2 years, i flushed the tank out and removed the old fuel. I have ran sea foam in other sleds and have not seen a difference in plug color before. I borrowed a fuel pressure gauge and although it only went to 30psi I maxed it out before the engine even started running. The sled has a bog when I accelerate quickly. My dad held a small plastic bag over the head with the plugs taken out while I turned it over and no fuel-oil mixture at all, none what so ever, no residue was on the inside of the bag. I called the local dealer they explained to me its very unlikely that my TPS is out of spec, especially with a sled that is in such good shape and never been taken apart, at least until I stripped it down after I purchased it. Reed valves are in great shape. Synchronization between the oil pump and throttle are spot on. The only thing left that I can imagine is the issue is that I have partially plugged injectors. I know its not an air leak. I have read that with partially plugged injectors the sled can still run, and idle good, and have a good high end power, but it will bog during a sudden acceleration. I did put in brand new plugs, but I can attest that brand new plugs should immediately turn cardboard brown. My brother and I rebuilt his identical zr600 with efi, 99 model. Immediately his pistons and plugs were a nice cardboard brown, even with sea foam in the tank. The dealer was explaining to me that I can "pop" the injectors with a battery, but I have no experience doing so and would ask if anyone on this site has?
 

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With a machine of that age, it's probably not a bad idea getting the injectors cleaned anyway as part of maintenance. There are places near me that will do it for about $25/ea. They also flow test and give you the specs lbs./hr. Good to know if your injectors are same and in spec.

All that the dealer is telling you to do is actuate the solenoid when the machine's not running. I would be wary, as I think they might use 5v instead of 12v to run. Either way, you know they're firing or your sled wouldn't run. This isn't going to clean a clogged injector, you need the screens out etc.

The machine has no mods? Stock airbox and exhaust I'm assuming? That popping/hesitation you're experiencing could be several things. First I would start with a leakdown test of your engine. I know you mentioned not having air leaks but how can you be sure? Can you also post the compression? When diagnosing, good to know general engine condition first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Everything is stock, I took it to the local dealer, we checked over everything and I have 120 psi in each cylinder. TPS was in spec. Everything checked out. The dealer mechanic in which we worked on my sled together recommended, just using sea foam and running a tank of gas through it. And as far as a sled of that age, Those guys could not believe how nice and clean my sled is for being a 99. So I am just going to ride it and take it easy, periodically check plugs, possibly add a very small ratio or oil to the gas tank and just put some miles on it. Then she will be put in to storage. The mechanic also considered my bog issue could be caused by a weak clutch spring, thus it sat for 2 years without much use.
 
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