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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 01 ZR 800 w/ twin SLP pipes and other stuff loads up really bad while warming up. After it warms up, I need to get on it ( full throttle) 4 or 5 times before it cleans out. Any suggestions? I am assuming the remedy would be a carb adjustment or pilot change. Thanks in advance.
 

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It is very possible your carbs need some adjusting or re-jetting it is also possible you are letting it warm up for to long
 

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did it do it last year ?? or did you do some changes ??


BM...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It did do it last year also. It did it before the pipes I believe. I just had the engine out and completely rebuilt it. Now with it all back together, it does the same thing. Is it just too rich at idle? Can I turn the idle air screw out to lean it out at idle?
 

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have you cleaned the carbs lately? and are the floats level? if so see where your air screw is at and turn them out 1/4 at a time to see see if it helps...


BM...
 

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Throw a rebuild kit in the Fuel pump. The fuel pump uses pressure pulses from the bottom end of the engine to actuate the fuel pump diaphram. A hole in the fuel pump diaphram will load up the cylinder that it is plugged into. If you pull off the pulse hose and any liquid comes out, that's your problem.

Other than that, check jetting including pilot jet(possibly forgot to re install it during rebuild) and jet needle. Also, check float level and most importantly, the inlet needle and seats.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (HAMMERMAN @ Jan 3 2007, 06:58 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
Throw a rebuild kit in the Fuel pump. The fuel pump uses pressure pulses from the bottom end of the engine to actuate the fuel pump diaphram. A hole in the fuel pump diaphram will load up the cylinder that it is plugged into. If you pull off the pulse hose and any liquid comes out, that's your problem.

Other than that, check jetting including pilot jet(possibly forgot to re install it during rebuild) and jet needle. Also, check float level and most importantly, the inlet needle and seats.[/b]
Thanks for the reply! Everything else I have is fuel injected so I'm far from adept w/ carbs. As a result I have two questions:
When you say check the float level, what am I checking for? Is there different settings the float can be at?

The fuel pump idea seems very plausible. Where should I pull the hose off? Fuel pump or off of the cylindr?

Thanks again.
 

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FLOAT LEVEL- If you remove the carbs, remove the bowl and turn the carb upside down, there is a brass float level arm that comes in contact with the floats that are locate in the bowl. If you look at the floats, you'll notice that they have little pins sticking out of the sides of them. These pins come in contact with the float arm and gently close the in-let needle as they begin to float from fuel entering the bowl. This system keeps the fuel in the bowl at the desired level to properly deliver fuel to the engine. If the in-let needle rubber tip is worn out, it will allow the float bowl to overfill. The float level is set by bending the tab just above the in-let needle with a small screw driver. The level is correct when the brass float level arms are level (or horizontal) when holding the carb upside down.

FUEL PUMP- The "Pulse Line" is the hose that you want to remove. It is the black hose that comes out of the bottom of the pump and goes to the crankcase of the engine. It might be easier to just remove the pump and diassemble it. If you notice any hole or small tearing in any of the diaphrams (especially the bottom one) than you will need to rebuild the pump and throw a rebuild kit in it.
 
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