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hey guys finally got this video loaded. here i am posting it for you, to show you all what the secondary clutch looks like disassembled, and showing you how to clock it, and understand how to clock it and what it does. in this video i also show you how to put it back together. it is a taste long at 11 mins. sorry. hope it helps any of you that need it!





http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2JED-oeXc-U
 

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Irony at it's finest. I was working on my secondary Saturday and was looking to see if you had done a video on how to reclock the secondary! I've done it before but was looking for the information you had in your chart (very nice by the way). I"m half tempted to put 'er in the C4 position just to see what's up. :)

Thanks for the excellent video man!
 

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ha. you'd likely need 30+ gram weights to get it to upshift. but since you wanna hold low gear longer get'er done!
 

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great !!!

i am looking to clock mine some time because it just shifts up to fast


with the 28" zillas its not bad but i am going to be running 29.5 laws or 30" backs so i think doing that will be good


what do you think i should go to for the laws or backs B 4 ?? i got your stage 1 done
 

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this should be made a sticky in the pinned section, If its not already done.

another great instructional video, adam
 

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hey guys finally got this video loaded. here i am posting it for you, to show you all what the secondary clutch looks like disassembled, and showing you how to clock it, and understand how to clock it and what it does. in this video i also show you how to put it back together. it is a taste long at 11 mins. sorry. hope it helps any of you that need it!





secondary clutch disassembly clock - YouTube
So does this pertain to the 07 models too, cuz thats a suzuki engine, just wondering if its the same
 

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No it's not.The zuki has no holes to re-clock unless you drill them on the 400 and 500(no helix).EPI has a good video on the suzuki/cat engines.Best bet is to get an EPI maroon secondary if you are running bigger tires..
 

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i'm not running bigger tires, i have the quad maxx's on dere, but when i hit the mud it just seems to shift up to early, so i can't get the tires spinin in 4 high, the 4 low is just to low and i eventually get stuck...just need it to stay in lower gear a lil longer, and also it doesn't seems to backshift way to late when going in and out of the corners, thanks...also i was looking at EPI clutching systems, just wondering before i buy one if there are holes already drilled in the secondary...
 

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i'm not running bigger tires, i have the quad maxx's on dere, but when i hit the mud it just seems to shift up to early, so i can't get the tires spinin in 4 high, the 4 low is just to low and i eventually get stuck...just need it to stay in lower gear a lil longer, and also it doesn't seems to backshift way to late when going in and out of the corners, thanks...also i was looking at EPI clutching systems, just wondering before i buy one if there are holes already drilled in the secondary...
I found the best gains were with airdam stage 1.I tried the dalton clutch kit with yellow spring and 23g rollers and it was ok but when I got my primary machined it was "holy crap".The 400 and 500 Suzuki engine cats don't have holes to reclock.They don't have a helix like in the video.
 

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I found the best gains were with airdam stage 1.I tried the dalton clutch kit with yellow spring and 23g rollers and it was ok but when I got my primary machined it was "holy crap".The 400 and 500 Suzuki engine cats don't have holes to reclock.They don't have a helix like in the video.
On the Suzuki style secondary's you can drill new holes to clock the secondary spring a little tighter. An old arctic cat service bulletin for High altitude is attached. You don't necessary need to be at a high altitude to get better backshifting and keeping the CVT gear lower longer. This may work out well for many of you who have installed larger diameter heavier weight tires even at at sea level.
 

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I found the best gains were with airdam stage 1.I tried the dalton clutch kit with yellow spring and 23g rollers and it was ok but when I got my primary machined it was "holy crap".The 400 and 500 Suzuki engine cats don't have holes to reclock.They don't have a helix like in the video.
So will this help it stay in lower gear i take it, and help it backshift better, or is this just for running bigger tires I dunno
cuz all i do is trail riding and when there is an occasional trail side mud pit i attempt it but the machine just bogs down in 4h, then 4L is to low, your Cat is a 07 500 you know what i'm talkin about right?
 

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On the Suzuki style secondary's you can drill new holes to clock the secondary spring a little tighter. An old arctic cat service bulletin for High altitude is attached. You don necessary need to be at a high altitude to get better backshifting and keeping the CVT gear lower longer.
Won't the make it worse due to the fact it will higher the gear and bog it down if quicker in the mud hole?
 

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With the clutch work and other mods it never bogs down. It will turn the 28" mst's in deep mud with the wife and I on it. I always run in low in the mud and let the tires do the work. I find hi is too fast and I don't like breaking things.With stock clutching it could not turn 26" mudlites with the wife and I on it in low.


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Won't the make it worse due to the fact it will higher the gear and bog it down if quicker in the mud hole?
No just the opposite, it will maintain a lower ratio longer and back shift sooner to a lower ratio instead of bogging the engine down
 

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Does anyone have any comments about Airdam's clutch staging on a 2009 H1 TRV 550 LE? Mine is all stock but have noticed it powering out at times when driving through mud. Will the staging change anything? The next level is A1, & will that gear it down? Will I lose top end speed or gain top end speed? What do you need to do to get it to lift the front end?
 

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Does anyone have any comments about Airdam's clutch staging on a 2009 H1 TRV 550 LE? Mine is all stock but have noticed it powering out at times when driving through mud. Will the staging change anything? The next level is A1, & will that gear it down? Will I lose top end speed or gain top end speed? What do you need to do to get it to lift the front end?
Although this reply is a reply to Clamb, The contents are valid for anyone wanting to tune their CVT system. Before the idea of machining the pulleys became common, we were limited to shims and smaller diameter rollers as options to obtain a lower low initial CVT ratio. There are two members on this site that I know of who perform CVT machining for hire, Papa-Slap and ///airdam. There may be others as well. Some have machined their own pulleys others have had a local machine shop or machinist friend do it for them. I do not know exactly how it is done, and how much, and where it gets machined, but shouldn't be that hard to figure out given enough thought. I am satisfied with the results I'm getting with smaller diameter rollers in my primary and secondary spring preload. A person could purchase one of several pre-engineered aftermarket clutch kits that are available or have their pulleys machined. However there is a lot a person can do at a lot less cost too. Keep in mind those aftermarket pre-engineered clutch kits are often a lot better then stock may not be ideal either. With the information contained here, you should be well underway to fine tuning your CVT stock or aftermarket to your liking for your needs.

The first thing I would try if I were you is to go ahead and increase secondary preload to A1 and try it. That alone will allow the CVT to remain in a lower ratio longer and improve back shifting by allowing the CVT to automatically gear down to a lower ratio quicker before the engine starts to bog out. In your case Clamb, based upon your question, I can almost guarantee that your idea of increasing preload to A1 will be better then what you currently have. To find out what is best, you need to experiment more. You may find A1 is not enough maybe 1 or 2 more steps tighter or even more will be ideal for your 550, tires and your riding style. This will raise the full load acceleration RPM a little bit, not much though. It should not affect top speed unless you start getting it real tight. In my opinion you can set it too tight. The main purpose of secondary preload or spring stiffness is to provide for improved proper backshifting and maintain a tight belt. Keep in mind it takes engine HP power to squeeze the belt. If you squeeze the belt harder then necessary to prevent belt slip you are not putting that HP to the ground. Also squeezing the belt tighter than necessary also creates more belt heat and belt life may suffer. In my opinion never increase spring preload tighter then necessary to prevent belt slip and to give you the desired backshifting performance you are after. I've got my secondary's on my 650H1 and Tcat set at B2. In my opinion there are gains to be made over stock CVT tuning even if you have a stock machine and stock sized tires. If you have over sized, over weight tires there are even more gains to CVT tuning. And when I say CVT tuning that includes finding out what is ideal for both the primary and the secondary. Having a lower low initial CVT ratio will definitely make it easier to get the front end up in the air. There is No One size fits all When it comes to CVT tuning.... Try something, test it, document it, try something different, repeat until happy. Tire size, Tire weight, Differential ratio, Machine weight, Your body weight, Engine size, Engine mods, Your altitude, & Your riding preferences and style all have an effect upon ideal CVT tuning. The key is to....Find what is best for you.

Next thing I'd do if I were you is to lighten the primary rollers some, you can remove the metal insert and drill holes through the metal to lighten them or purchase lighter rollers. One or two grams per roller is usually all it needs. In my opinion under full load full throttle acceleration you want the engine to be spinning about 6000-6100 RPM, Opinions vary, mud riders may want this RPM higher. Stock is usually around 5400-5500 RPM in high range. Increasing the full load acceleration RPM allows the engine to stay in it's power band better while still having enough RPM left before the rev limiter is hit to obtain a top speed after the CVT is fully shifted out. I set full load acceleration RPM while in high range. If you prefer low range in the mud then you would set full load acceleration to about 6000-6100 RPM while in low range. You can tune your CVT for optimum in High range or for optimum in Low range or seek a balance between high and low range. Your choice really. If you go too light in primary weights you may hit the rev limiter before the primary fully closes or you may not have enough weight to fully close the primary pulley.

Basic overly simplified CVT operation. When you pin the throttle open, the engine hits a certain RPM and holds that RPM as the machine gains speed. Gaining speed is a function of the CVT upshifting and is controlled by the centrifugal force applied upon the primary weights closing the primary pulleys together. When the primary closes the secondary opens. Once the CVT is fully upshifted additional gain in speed is solely dependent upon engine RPM until you hit the rev limiter if you have enough HP to gain speed on up to the rev limit RPM. Ideal or perfect upshifting is when you are able to maintain engine RPM and utilize all HP to gain speed as quickly as possible. Also a big part of the rate of upshift is the angle of the helix in the secondary and in some smaller part the amount of preload and or spring stiffness. Backshifting or having the CVT automatically gear down as the wheel speed drops under heavy load is mainly a function of the secondary spring preload and spring rate or stiffness. Ideal backshifting is the point of where the engine is able to maintain a higher RPM in it's power band while the CVT backshifts automatically into a continually lower ratio until it is nearly fully backshifted. You will be loosing speed but RPM would be maintained until the CVT is nearly fully backshifted. This is what prevents your engine from powering out or bogging out. In summary engine speed or RPM controls upshift rate, wheel speed or wheel RPM controls back shift rate.

CVT tuning is a process where you find a balance in primary roller weight secondary preload and spring stiffness at a RPM matching your engines pwerband and style. Ignoring helix angle here on purpose. There is a lot of interaction between all the parts of the secondary and the primary in putting power to the ground while utilizing all available engine HP. If you set your Secondary for perfect backshifting, it will probably have poor upshift and vice versa. Stock CVT tuning on cats is set leans towards a better upshift performance then an ideal backshift performance. Mud-riders would probably benefit towards better back shift performance tuning. You cannot achieve perfect back shifting and perfect upshifting with a CVT at the same time. It's both a Science and a Art finding the perfect balance. Let me say I'm not very scientific or artistic when it comes to CVT tuning, so please don't ask. I've pretty much have stated all I know here already. And everything I do know I've learned from this site and via trial and error on my own cats. If you learn something you think I could benefit from, please share it.

Quite a few people have just removed 2 of the 8 primary weights, as long as the 2 weights you remove are 180 degrees apart from each other balance is retained. Removing two weights maybe too much weight reduction and your fully loaded acceleration will be too high. Your CVT may not fully shift out and may not hit your full top speed before the rev limiter is hit. If I remember right this option of removing two weights works best on older 400 and 500 Suzuki based CVT's. Something you can try though and see if it works for you.

To get a lower initial low CVT gearing, there are three things things you can do. One or the other, not all three at the same time. Although I imagine you could install smaller diameter weights and fine tune even more with thinner shims under the fixed plate. The whole idea in a nutshell is to make it so the belt rides lower in the primary and higher in the secondary. This is what gives you the lower low CVT ratio. I use option #2 on both my cats and machined the roller diameters smaller. Granted I take a little hit on top end speed but I've got better lower initial low CVT gearing. In my case since I have a lathe, cost was free. I could get back some of my top speed loss via the fixed plate mod. The fixed plate mod is nothing more than ///Airdam's stage two I believe. See his website.

1. Install a shim(s) under the Gold fixed plate in the primary, thickness ranges between 1mm to 2.5 mm. Get one 1mm shim and three .5mm shims and you're set to try four different spacings. What this does is allow the primary to open up further allowing the belt to ride lower in the primary and higher in the secondary and gives you a lower low initial CVT gearing. This can affect top speed though a little. What you gain on the bottom you loose at the top. Cost is at most a couple dollars each for shim washers from local hardware store. Many who have done this also performed the "fixed plate mod" to recover some of what was lost on the top end. What you do not want is to shim it out too far and have the belt riding on the center spool. There must be some gap between the bottom of the belt and the center spool or your belt will slip. Also of you go too far the belt will ride too high in the secondary pulley and may rub against the belt case.

2. Install smaller diameter rollers or have the stock rollers turned down to a smaller diameter. The diameter of a turned roller will be about 1.1" or 27.9mm. The result is the same as installing a shim, a lower low initial CVT ratio. This can affect top speed a little same as above. Speedwerx sells smaller diameter rollers in several different weights, (Pricey though) or you can turn them down to a smaller diameter in a lathe or have it done at a local shop. I measured one of my used rollers and its about 1.095" in diameter now. I forget what the stock size is. Maybe close to 1.25" give or take. Many who have done this also performed the "fixed plate mod" to recover what was lost on the top end. There must be some gap between the bottom of the belt and the center spool of the primary or your belt will slip. Also of you go too far the belt will ride too high in the secondary pulley and may rub against the belt case.

3. Probably the best option out of the three is to... Machine your primary pulley sheaves so the belt rides lower in the primary. (stage 1) You can do this yourself with a lathe or have Pappa-slap,or ///Airdam do it for you. The result are largely the same as the two options above, plus a little more. Giving even a lower low initial CVT gearing with the benefit of not affecting the top speed much at all. Machining the primary will give you even a lower low initial low ratio than either of the two options above. Cost is higher although but the results are better. In addition both ///airdam and I think Pappa Slap also have a fixed plate mod you can have done which can give you a little more top end than stock if you have the HP to pull it. If you don't have the power to overcome increased wind drag, you'll not get anymore top speed though. There must be some gap between the bottom of the belt and the center spool or your belt will slip. Also if you go too far the belt will ride too high in the secondary pulley and may rub against the belt case.

Note: The closer in equal weight all rollers are, the quieter the CVT will be. If your CVT rattles a lot at idle, chances are your rollers are not balanced. Stock rollers often are not equal in weight and may differ 1 to 2 tenths of a gram in weight. Get all rollers of the same weight and the CVT makes a lot less noise. I balance mine on a reloading bullet scale to an exact equal weight for all eight rollers. It will not be completely silent, but will be a lot better.

When CVT tuning, if the results is not what you expect or like try something different, that is what CVT tuning is.. finding a combination that fits your machine, tires and your style of riding. Experiment until you are satisfied. Setting the secondary preload or changing springs so it has good back shifting characteristics and setting primary roller weights to an optimum weight to maintain engine RPM better. Stock CVT tuning is pretty mild and set for better fuel efficiency but offers poor back-shifting and does not allow the engine to stay in it's optimum power band very well when up-shifting.

Roller weights options. If you want spare rollers on hand for tuning see below. Note: you can mix rollers of different weights to obtain an ideal total weight for your machine. For instance you could use 4-19 gram weights and 4-23 gram weights for a total weight of 168 grams. Just make sure you swap out in even multiples to maintain balance. As a rule of thumb I've found each gram per weight reduction increases my full load, full throttle, high range RPM about 100 RPM on my Tcat. Yours may differ because you may not have the same tires or ATV. What ever the amount of change you get per gram is good to know when tuning. If one gram per weight equaled 150 RPM change on your machine and you wanted to change the RPM another 300 RPM, then you'd know you would need to change the weight per roller about 2 grams each. Document your changes and results and you'll have a direction or history to follow for further changes in CVT tuning. Turning down the diameter of a stock weight will lighten them a little, not much though, maybe a gram or a gram and a half each maybe. I'd have to refer to my own documentation if I could find it even.

Replacement roller stock numbers.

19 gram roller - red - prowler 700 09+ - part number: 0823-164
21 gram roller - blue - various H1 engines - part number: 0823-167
23 gram roller - green - Tcat engines - part number: 0823-170
25 gram roller - white - 06+ 500 - part number: 3402-482
28 gram roller - white - 06+ 700/750 Suzuki part #: 21650-31G00
33 gram roller - black - 10+ Tcat mudpro - part number: 0823-298

Shim or small rollers explanation. (Old school CVT Tuning)
http://www.arcticchat.com/forum/uti...info/246218-clutch-rollers-2.html#post1925919

A search will often give you additional information, ideas and or instructions. Here is a link to a video prepared by ///air showing how to lighten primary roller weights.
http://www.arcticchat.com/forum/uti...s-lighten-them-up-question-2.html#post2298265

Perhaps there are others who have already tuned their CVT on a 550H1 for similar conditions and tire size you have. Asking what others have done in the "Performance and Technical" section would be a good place to start. You'd probably get a lot more replies there. This pinned section is NOT the best place to ask questions, its intended function is more of a resource area for proven results others have already found.
 

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Nice write up !!!!!! You pretty much covered it all.
One other thing you can do to see where your belt is riding in the primary is draw a line with a sharpie from the inner diameter to the outer diameter. Take it for a wot run and pull it apart. Where there is still sharpie your belt is not touching.


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