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Discussion Starter #1
I've read alot of posts about mixing Seaform (liquid) in the gas tank, but has anyone tried spraying the stuff down the cylinders to loosen up built up carbon.

I was planning on shooting some down the cylinders, letting it sit overnight, blow most of it out of the cylinders with the plugs off and then burning the rest off with the plugs on. Good/bad idea? Read of a few guys doing this to their chevs in the GM-Trucks forum (instead of spraying in the throttle body/carb).

Whatcha think? :sledder:
 

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I recomend running it thru the fuel system. If there is deposites from fuel the SF will go to the same place and eventually rinse it clean.
If you have heavy build up then removing larger pieces at a time might end up in the motor and cause damage.
Where is the build up at, just in the exhaust port ?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE </div>
Where is the build up at, just in the exhaust port[/b]
Yes, but its minor. Can see abit on the top of the pistons thru the plug hole. Again, nothing excessive.

You may be right about just running it through the fuel.
 

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Might be more effective in terms of how much used per carbon removed if run through the gas as per instructions. I'm sure the product will act as a solvent when poured into the plug hole, but the thing is much of that will get pumped out raw into the exhaust without having dissolved any carbon at all... Wasted. Plus, it may be more effective at combustion temperatures. There will be much more of it burned off rather than going raw into the environment too if mixed with fuel.

I would think after all the years it's been around, the engineers at SeaFoam would know how to advise so their product works best. So try to pour in a minimal amount if you choose to pour it into the spark plug holes.

As for automotive engines, probably more effective if used as instructed... Because pouring it into the spark plug hole will not remove the caked on gummy varnish deposits on the backside of the intake valve & also the intake valve stem & guide. Also remember it is likely more effective at the higher combustion temps... Good chance it will be pumped out of the cylinder raw and too cold to be as effective as when hot.

I would like to suggest another product that does the same but is actually more cost effective because it is far more concentrated so smaller doses are needed and one bottle will do many many more treatments each with equal effect as an entire can of SeaFoam.

It is BRP's product called Carbon Guard. All it takes in the average sled gas tank is approximately one ounce, and it is a 12 ounce bottle. Retails for around $18 Canadian up here, likely less cost in the US. It can be found at BRP's Marine dealers that sell Johnson & Evinrude outboards. Far more economical than SeaFoam, and every bit as good.

:chug:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks AG. Yeah, I heard of Carbon Guard - good to know the differences in concentration. I have the Sea Foam stuff now (both the spray can and bottle), so I'll use this up first.

I'm planning on switching to the Shell syn oil this year and I wanted to clean up the cylinders as some pre-season maintenance.
 

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There is supposed to be a layer of carbon on the tops of the pistons. This carbon layer tells you the tune of the engine. An engine that is running too rich will have lots of thew carbon washed away and properly tuned engine will have a solid carbon layer with small washed clean areas at the transfer ports and maybe at the exhaust port.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE </div>
There is supposed to be a layer of carbon on the tops of the pistons. This carbon layer tells you the tune of the engine. An engine that is running too rich will have lots of thew carbon washed away and properly tuned engine will have a solid carbon layer with small washed clean areas at the transfer ports and maybe at the exhaust port.[/b]
Good point - I remember seeing someone's post on piston wash and jetting.
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (94ZR580 @ Nov 19 2009, 06:28 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
There is supposed to be a layer of carbon on the tops of the pistons. This carbon layer tells you the tune of the engine. An engine that is running too rich will have lots of thew carbon washed away and properly tuned engine will have a solid carbon layer with small washed clean areas at the transfer ports and maybe at the exhaust port.[/b]
X2,X2,X2, how could you read your pistons if you have no wash to look at? Myself, I would not change oil as each oil will adhear to the metals at different rates. It takes awhile for one oil to wash away the other and you will have a short period of time when you will not have the proper protection. If you do this I would suggest you take it easy for the first tank of gas. Ron.
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (whitefish @ Nov 19 2009, 01:15 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
Thanks AG. Yeah, I heard of Carbon Guard - good to know the differences in concentration. I have the Sea Foam stuff now (both the spray can and bottle), so I'll use this up first.

I'm planning on switching to the Shell syn oil this year and I wanted to clean up the cylinders as some pre-season maintenance.[/b]

Whitefish, just as a heads up I have run the Shell Advance (both mineral based and syn) for 10 years now. Absolutely no issues with how the product protects the engine but it will absolutely burn the eyes right out of the skulls of the people following you.

Riding a CAT we are always out in front so you need to consider this if you ride with a group of people you actually like. Last year I switched to Motul Snow Power after my Triple Touring was renamed the stink o sauras. Anyway, just my thoughts.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE </div>
X2,X2,X2, how could you read your pistons if you have no wash to look at? Myself, I would not change oil as each oil will adhear to the metals at different rates. It takes awhile for one oil to wash away the other and you will have a short period of time when you will not have the proper protection. If you do this I would suggest you take it easy for the first tank of gas. Ron.[/b]
Will do, thanks Ron. Not shooting anything down the cylinders.

<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE </div>
Whitefish, just as a heads up I have run the Shell Advance (both mineral based and syn) for 10 years now. Absolutely no issues with how the product protects the engine but it will absolutely burn the eyes right out of the skulls of the people following you.[/b]
Really? Ands its advertised as low smoke......?
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (whitefish @ Nov 23 2009, 10:45 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
Really? Ands its advertised as low smoke......?[/b]
Interesting... Maybe an oil pump pumping a little too much? Or other reason?

I've been asking those following behind, they claim they can't smell anything at all. ArcticChat member Houleigan will back that up as he is usually the one behind me most often.

<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (Wayne from Pontypool @ Nov 21 2009, 11:15 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
AG - does carbon guard also work as a moisture absorber? I mainly use seafoam to dissolve and guard against the ethanol induced snot balls that are created when any moisture (snow) gets into the tank. I always run premium now (no ethanol) but it is not always available[/b]
Wayne, sorry I missed your question. Seems I often miss posts that were posted on weekends because I'm not online very much on weekends.

I only run Carbon guard very occaisionally (maybe twice per season) and always 87 regular gas, so I don't know if it's feasible as a regular use moisture/ethanol water cure-all.

I've had zero ethanol-related fuel issues and no gunk in the tank caused by things other than fuel such as ethanol, snow, etc. I have a couple Fitch units in the tank, maybe they make some sort of difference? One thing I did notice about the Fitch is gas never stales, ethanol/water doesn't seperate and 'puddle' beneath the fuel.

Could it be these Fitch Fuel Catalysts actually do something worthwhile? Could be, I also have them in my ATV, Generator and boat tanks, never a single fuel issue and storage fuel stabilzer isn't needed either. I'm beginning to think these Fitch things are worth it, even though I was highly skeptical at first. It's just that I'm having zero fuel issues, but so many are, and they're buying the same gas as me and everyone else does.

Carbon Guard does clean the fuel system though, even injector orifices on EFI/DFI engines. But this product really wasn't intended for constant regular usage as an ethanol issue cure. Might end up cost prohibitive if used in every tank.

I don't know if isopropyl is going to help cure ethanol issues either. Have you ever tried Star Brite's 'StarTron' fuel enzyme treatment? One of the marina supply shops near the Queen's Quay area harbour here recommended it highly, claimed his customer's boat fuel tanks clean right up and stay clean with regular use of the stuff. Owner of the company where I work uses it religiously on his ATV engine. But I'm not sure if he can tell a difference as he's been using it regularly since the quad was brand new. Seems to be a product sepcifically targeting the ethanol/water issue.
 

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Seafoam and Fitch fuel catylyst units = money very well spent IMHO. Never a problem with either,in any of my sleds, or bikes. Carbs, and fuel systems are spotless. Carbon deposits are minimal as well. My bud, has the Fitch unit in the fuel tank of his Yam. Viper, and there has been a very definate slight increase in power, in both our opinions.
chflagwv:
 
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