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So a colleague of mine at work, who owns a REV 800 (2005), was telling me he purchased a bottle of "Water Wetter" over the weekend. He installed a temp gauge last year, and was seeing his temps rise a bit more than what he considered normal ... ran around 170 degrees pretty consistently in good conditions. He read about this product on Dootalk and decided to give it a whirl. He started his sled w/o the Water Wetter, and saw his temp gauge climb. He then turned off his sled and let it sit for a few houurs. Next he added some Water Wetter, and ran his sled again. This time he noticed his temp gauge barely climbed after adding this product. I dunno

Supposedly it's designed to reduce air bubbles that form on the inner part of your coolant system. The theory is, without air bubbles you have more surface area allowing the cooling process. Seems pretty sound. I was curious if anyone tried it in their sled & what kind of an impact you were seeing? Not that I'm going out to buy it right away, but it would be interesting to hear first hand stories if people have tried this stuff.
 

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FWIW,, my opinion on that along with a ''certain'' oil that ''burns so clean'' yet protects engine parts like no other on the face of this great blue round planet we're on (and i've personally seen serious heat issues from this great oil on a few polaris engines in past),,, sounds like a gimmick to me, yes it may ''adhere itself'' to the inner walls of the cyls and such,, but, what will it do over a long haul (as sled engines w/good care far outlast mx bike engines, which btw, was what water wetter was originally invented for) as it encounters varying grades/formulas of coolant and the innards of the aluminum and gaskets between teardowns/replacements????

Just an honest question/point to think about,, nothing i'm getting excited about, Lol
 

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Exactly the type of person I was hoping to hear from Rusty ... thanks man :beer_cheers: Like I said, I'm in no hurry to rush out and buy it. I just found it interesting listening to my REV buddy talk about it. I went to their website (click here) and watched the flash clip. I think you hit the nail on the head, in that it's designed (if it's even real) for warm temperature engines vs. cold weather machines. Guess I'll see how it works out for my buddy ... if it snows.
 

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I would use it, for the simple fact that AG uses it, he has told me it works, and AG isn't the type of guy to just go out and buy crap. If he is sold on it, then he has done is homework and the product is good.
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (Houleigan @ Dec 28 2006, 08:55 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
I would use it, for the simple fact that AG uses it, he has told me it works, and AG isn't the type of guy to just go out and buy crap. If he is sold on it, then he has done is homework and the product is good.[/b]
Interesting ... should be good hearing AG's opinions. I guess I'm not really sure of the gains unless you continuously run in conditions that would warm the sled up beyond 180*? Thanks Chris :beer_cheers:
 

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There's nothing "gimmicky" about Water Wetter - it simply reduces the surface tension of the water in your cooling system, thus allowing better heat transfer from the engine to the water itself.

Water Wetter has been used for YEARS by anyone/everyone who races cars or bikes whose sanctioning body does not allow conventional antifreeze coolants on the tracks. It works, and is well documented as working.

Personally, I've never had a need to use it in my sled, but I run it in my Aprilia street bike and have used in in several cars I've owned. Coolant temperature will decrease significantly, however, keep in mind that if the coolant is colder than the opening temperature of your thermostat, then there's not much point in using a product that increases heat transfer efficiency.

If you have a temp gauge on your sled and have noticed high temperatures, then give it a try and see for yourself. Make sure you follow the directions, and make sure your cooling system is in good operating order before you start.
 

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Labonte, the water wetter is a good product. Many road racing and circle track guys run it in their engines, because you can't run any glycol based anti- freeze for the track slickening factor. We used it in a SCCA car that I used to work on several years back. Anyone who is a Redline distributor should be able to hook you up. Now you got me thinking I should call my shock guy who I buy my Redline Synthetic from and get a bottle. Damn, now I'll probably spend more money just for my sleds to sit (thanks to this weather)- thanks alot Labonte!!!! :tongue_nana: bang your head badcomputer :lol:

Here is a link- there is a demo that explains it pretty well:
http://www.redlineoil.com/products_coolant.asp

CNote, sorry to disagree on this. There is some good science here.....

I am thinking if you lose 10 or 20 degrees of temp, then you gain a couple HP, right? Think of how doggy your sled feels on those 40* days compared to 0 or 10*.

There are some people selling it on ebay $6- 10 a bottle. Auto Zone and Advance Auto also carry it (supposedly).

WOW, something intelligent is discussed over on DooTalk rather than just "MachZ wins; Cats are POS's." I am amazed....
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (f5firecat @ Dec 29 2006, 10:35 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
Now you got me thinking I should call my shock guy who I buy my Redline Synthetic from and get a bottle. Damn, now I'll probably spend more money just for my sleds to sit (thanks to this weather)- thanks alot Labonte!!!! :tongue_nana: bang your head badcomputer :lol:[/b]
Just doing my part to help out the local economy buddy!!! LOL :beer_cheers: slaphappy :sure_ok:
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (f5firecat @ Dec 29 2006, 11:35 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
CNote, sorry to disagree on this. There is some good science here.....



WOW, something intelligent is discussed over on DooTalk rather than just "MachZ wins; Cats are POS's." I am amazed....[/b]
:thumbsup: ,, much better reply than I expected, but i still have doubts about it being in with regular coolant formulas and longer lengths of time




see there really is another good site besides this one
 

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Yeah, I don't think it's snake-oil. Since I started using the stuff, the temp gauge shows temps don't seem to climb as critically high as often when running on low or no snow stretches. Just my observation though, it's no scientific study by any means.

If you've ever looked inside a kettle while it's approaching boiling temps, eventually you will see lots of tiny bubbles form on the hot surface a long time before it reaches a full boil. This is what happens on the cylinder side of the water jacket around the bores. Worth noting... A pressurized system will cause less bubbles to form. The higher the pressure, the higher temps can be reached without bubbles around the bore side of the water jacket.

Water wetter claims to prevent/reduce the bubbles by raising the temperature of when those bubbles will form... And if it's true, it's a good thing because a layer of bubbles will slow down heat dissipation. Once they start, the curve of temperature climb will become steeper than before the bubbles.

Of course, in key areas where the coolant flows with high gpm rates, bubbles are a non-issue. The thing is, coolant flows less turbulently around the middle & base of the jugs than it does at the head near the exit/enter hose. Even then, the head may get hot enough to cause bubbles.

In safe temp ranges when there's adequate cooling, watter wetter probably has no advantage. It can only make a worthwhile difference when engine coolant temps get dangerously high.

Try it... Mix a sample of your coolant/distilled water without water wetter. Mix another sample with water wetter. Heat both up in a tin can or old pot, use a thermometer to measure the temps when the bubbles form, and boiling temps. Sure, this experiment isn't in a pressurized system, but it will demonstrate the temperature difference between the samples, when bubbles form and the boiling point.

:chug:
 

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I've used watter wetter in my sleds since 2000. I have never run a scientific test. I don't run temp guages.

I do know it is MUCH more effective in 100% water. In our sled engines I'd be surprised if it helps more than a degree or 2. We don't run our coolant on the edge of boil....where it would probably be most effective.
 

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First of all, I'm not planning on do this, so don't crucify me, okay? :stop_nono: But if you just want to increase the wetting action of water, all you need to do is add some borax. You know, the "20 Mule Team" stuff. I do use it in the water in my diamond saw, and it makes a considerable difference in the waters ability to cool the blade. You can visibly see how the water films out over the blade instead of "streaming" across it. Of course I don't run any antifreeze, just plain water and borax in the saw.
If an engine is in need of this, I'd think that you were definitely running marginal if you need to consider such an option. JMOO
But I can also see where, if it makes you feel more secure on the trail, by all means go for it. :beer_cheers:
 

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Awwwwwwwww cmon Rusty! I know how you feel and I have no factual basis to disagree. If it helps my 140+ hp engines run a fuzz safer it's worth the $8.
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (f5firecat @ Dec 29 2006, 11:35 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
CNote, sorry to disagree on this. There is some good science here.....

I am thinking if you lose 10 or 20 degrees of temp, then you gain a couple HP, right? Think of how doggy your sled feels on those 40* days compared to 0 or 10*.[/b]
Now I gotta call you on this one. You're comparing coolant temperature to ambient air temperature leaning out your fuel ratio. Sounds like it might be a little bit twisted science to me. :D
 

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Come on kev, yes there is good science behind this stuff, and like AG said- it's probably not snake oil, but there could be some positives to this product.

If my post came off as a product endorsement, then sorry, but it is fact that an engine that is cooler makes more HP- so IF this stuff makes the engine run a little cooler then maybe a little HP, but most importantly (especially for the Poo Edge riders I know) if you run cooler in low snow or warm days, maybe you wouldn't have to be towed due to overheating and buy pistons, etc.

Not trying to pick a fight, just my opinion...... Not worthy:
 

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I have used watterwetter in my asphalt sled in my trail sled and in my computer.
After adding watter wetter to my computer it dropped 7 degrees at idle. considering it was running 84 before and now 77 thats almost 10% reduction in temps. In my asphalt sled we cant run antifreeze so it is something you need there. I dont really think you need it in most trail sleds, but i had some around so in it went.
Later
 

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This product has been used in Industrial water treatment programs for years.
I myself have used it on occasion in cooling tower water treatment.
Looks like the performance industry got a hold of it for obvious reasons.

Here is a break down below that gives a brief explanation of the basic principle.


Water is a very effective dust control material as it wets the small dust particles and forces the particles to adhere to each other and agglomerate. In situations where water is scarce or it is impractical to wet surfaces daily an additive can be used to achieve, longer lasting results. A surfactant, or surface active agent, makes water more efficient by making water wetter.

Water becomes "wetter" by lowering its surface tension. The surface tension of water is a force that defines its behavior. This can be viewed by filling a glass over the rim with water, or by placing drops of water on a hard surface. With the addition of a surfactant the drops of water spread out and contact the surface more effectively.

Additionally, after the water evaporates, the dust particles must remain agglomerated. Surfactants do not evaporate and are residual. They continue to work after the surface appears dry. Under these conditions electrostatic forces are the main obstacle. Surfactants help to dissipate these forces and maximize the agglomeration of dust. The duration of the effect is dependent upon temperature, friction, and run off. Most surfactants are biodegradable as well and their concentration will decrease over time.

The bottom line is that water by itself has limited abilities and by adding the Water Wetter or surfactants in the right blend we can maximize the effectiveness of water. The longer you use this additive the better the results get because you get a cumulative residual effect. At a ratio of one part Water Wetter concentrate to up to 4,000 parts water, this obviously is an economical problem solver.

:sno: :sno:
:sno: :sno: :sno: :sno: :sno:
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (f5firecat @ Dec 29 2006, 11:17 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
Come on kev, yes there is good science behind this stuff, and like AG said- it's probably not snake oil, but there could be some positives to this product.

If my post came off as a product endorsement, then sorry, but it is fact that an engine that is cooler makes more HP- so IF this stuff makes the engine run a little cooler then maybe a little HP, but most importantly (especially for the Poo Edge riders I know) if you run cooler in low snow or warm days, maybe you wouldn't have to be towed due to overheating and buy pistons, etc.

Not trying to pick a fight, just my opinion...... Not worthy:[/b]
I know what you're saying. Just when you mention how much better a sled runs in cooler temps, I suspect there's a lot more factors at play than the coolant/engine temperature. Machines are designed to work around ideal operating conditions and any time you stray from the ideal, (obviously below freezing temps for sleds) you'll lose some of the performance. But that's just my opinion :beer_cheers:

As far as this product goes I have no opinion on it since I've never used it.
 
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