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Discussion Starter #1
Please excuse this elementary question, but I have an 08 M1000 162 sno pro and I weigh around 260. I feel the fox air shock in the track needs a little air in it. My questions: Can my little electric air compressor and it's regular attachment be used to put air in it, or do I need a special tool? Also, about how much air pressure should I start out with? 10-20 psi? Any feedback is much appreciated.
 

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I would recommend you use a pump. Since its just a small chamber one push on the pump will be adding more air then you think. But yes the regular pump works. Also start out with maybe 5-7 psi IMO I wouldn't do more then that. Also how much air is in it right now someone wih a similar weight and set up might be able to give you what they run.
 

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a regular bike pump would work but u need an air gauge that goes up to 150 psi which is max you with your weight will be up around the 150 psi mark. put enough air in so that when you get on it sinks down about an inch. im 200 pounds and I run at 140 psi. there is a special hand pump you can buy them from a mountain bike shop that has a built in gauge and its a hand pump.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
This is all interesting, thanks everyone. I still need to see if any air is in it at all. The sled feels good to me in the deep stuff but it bottomed out a few times on the bumpy trail to get to the riding. So, should I start out with at least 100 pounds or so?
 

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You need a shock pump. When guys here say "bike pump"... they mean a shock pump for a bike, not what you'd think of for tires.

They're pretty cheap on ebay or at a bike shop.

As to PSI, fox says 150 is max, but at 260+ gear, you need to be well beyond that, I'd agree with the 165+ minimum stated above.

110 is what my 105 lb wife runs in her float, I'm 190 and I run 150. obviously personal preference, and based on how we ride, but that gives just a n idea where to start.

One thing though, in general most folks agree that the float isn't ideal for anyone heavier... some say that "limit" is as low as 215, some say 230-250... but you're GOING to be disappointed with it.

Some of the M's came with coils, you may want to see if anyone is willing to trade you the float for a coil which would be more ideal. The float is supposed to be a "one size fits all" kind of deal, but unfortunately, it does have it's limits.

For heavier riders, Zbros, and a few other shock companies make some VERY nice coils which will ride much better than anything you could ever get from one of our stock shocks though... might be worth your while.


Btw, to figure out proper PSI for you, grab your backpack, put it on, and hop on the sled. You want the sled to have 1-4" of sag depending on how you ride. Trail guys want more, mountain guys want less. I run 1-2" on my sleds, and still bottom the suspension here & there.
when i say sag, I mean topped out, no weight on the sled on a flat surface, check height of the bumper, then hop on with your pack on and measure how much the bumper has dropped after bouncing the sled a bit and coming to rest. (helps to have a buddy there with you)
 
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Discussion Starter #8
That helps a lot Kaleb. I will probably just put some air in it and live with it since I prefer deep snow off the trail. The best thing for me would be to do a few push aways from the dinner table but I doubt that's gonna happen! Thanks again for the good info.
 

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You can tighten up the preload on the center shock, and should, but that won't fix the float.
 

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Fox changed the specs you can go over 200 psi with out issues

Do you feel that they've made sufficient changes so that it works better for heavier riders now as well?

We've always had people who have run higher PSI, but they tend to still be unhappy with the performance of the shock.

I like the float myself, so happy to see them working for more people if that's the case.
 
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Discussion Starter #13
So, that means I could go up to 200 psi on my float? With the center shock, to stiffen pre-load do you turn the ring to the right? I did it once on a 4 wheeler but it's been a while.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I just remembered i ordered the 150 psi pump from country cat so I probably can't go any higher without being unsure.
 

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you can get a 300 psi pump for about $30.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
What about putting nitrogen in these fox air shocks? Is it a benefit? Also, is 75 pounds in the front shocks seem like too much air?
 

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What about putting nitrogen in these fox air shocks? Is it a benefit? Also, is 75 pounds in the front shocks seem like too much air?
75 is fine... it comes down to what you like. some like 40, some like 80. Using nitrogen is pointless though... you can no longer adjust them then.
 

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What about putting nitrogen in these fox air shocks? Is it a benefit? Also, is 75 pounds in the front shocks seem like too much air?
Nitrogen has less moisture then air, no change to shox. There still is fluid in them, check/rebuild that before changing to a coil over.
 
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