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Discussion Starter #1
New to the sport and bought a great 2011 Z1 LXR. Took the belt off today for the first time, no problem. Went to put it back on and I cannot get the sheave adjuster to seat. See photos. Between removing it and replacing it, I took it down off the work stand arguably moving the track slightly. What research I have been able to find says that the secondary is "stuck" and that rotating the track by hand or running it slightly (which I am a bit hesitant to do) will "pop" it back into place (see this thread). Is this accurate?!

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New to the sport and bought a great 2011 Z1 LXR. Took the belt off today for the first time, no problem. Went to put it back on and I cannot get the sheave adjuster to seat. See photos. Between removing it and replacing it, I took it down off the work stand arguably moving the track slightly. What research I have been able to find says that the secondary is "stuck" and that rotating the track by hand or running it slightly (which I am a bit hesitant to do) will "pop" it back into place (see this thread). Is this accurate?!

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Discussion Starter #4
Since this is an "F" series sled and the old ZR's don't have this style clutch maybe post this in the F series section
Hi, thanks - I will do that. You bring up something I've been wanting to learn about. Are you about to provide a quick summary of the model line lineage from sleds in this era (~2008 - 2015)? I've noticed similarities to sleds like the Crossfire R 800 (in videos) but don't have a good feel for how the models flowed. What is an "F" series sled, for example. Sounds like a platform?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Apologies - reposting in this forum as someone let me know that my sled is an "F" series chassis. Any help much appreciated! The secondary slips right off the splines. Is there a "tap" I can give this assembly to have it spring back? Why would it stick - it's in great condition.

New to the sport and bought a great 2011 Z1 LXR. Took the belt off today for the first time, no problem. Went to put it back on and I cannot get the sheave adjuster to seat. See photos. Between removing it and replacing it, I took it down off the work stand arguably moving the track slightly. What research I have been able to find says that the secondary is "stuck" and that rotating the track by hand or running it slightly (which I am a bit hesitant to do) will "pop" it back into place (see this thread). Is this accurate?!

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Discussion Starter #6
Hi, pardon the repost in this forum as I am now getting my footing around the forums as to what the most relevant sections are to my sled. Thank you!

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New to the sport and bought a great 2011 Z1 LXR. Took the belt off today for the first time, no problem. Went to put it back on and I cannot get the sheave adjuster to seat. See photos. Between removing it and replacing it, I took it down off the work stand arguably moving the track slightly. What research I have been able to find says that the secondary is "stuck" and that rotating the track by hand or running it slightly (which I am a bit hesitant to do) will "pop" it back into place (see this thread). Is this accurate?!

View attachment 367491 View attachment 367492
 

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@Hock I merged and moved your posts into this section to help a bit.
That style secondary has been used on a number of sleds. The odd seating of the adjuster cap is normal.
Verify that the O ring isn't chewed up before replacing the cap.
I like to put a little pressure on the bolt to help with seating the cap. Here is the critical and fairly easy part. Lift the rear of the sled and start the motor. Give the throttle a little burp to start the track spinning. The cap will pop down into the helix.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
@Hock I merged and moved your posts into this section to help a bit.
That style secondary has been used on a number of sleds. The odd seating of the adjuster cap is normal.
Verify that the O ring isn't chewed up before replacing the cap.
I like to put a little pressure on the bolt to help with seating the cap. Here is the critical and fairly easy part. Lift the rear of the sled and start the motor. Give the throttle a little burp to start the track spinning. The cap will pop down into the helix.
Done! This absolutely worked exactly as you described. Like a charm. I am so pleased - thank you.

So this F-Series forum is the right one for sundry mechanical questions like this one?

Finally, any advice as to where I can read a little bit more about the F-Series chassis. Would be helpful to know which models were built on it as it will broaden my search criteria when looking for YouTube videos, for example.
 

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Hi, thanks - I will do that. You bring up something I've been wanting to learn about. Are you about to provide a quick summary of the model line lineage from sleds in this era (~2008 - 2015)? I've noticed similarities to sleds like the Crossfire R 800 (in videos) but don't have a good feel for how the models flowed. What is an "F" series sled, for example. Sounds like a platform?
Old ZR types; straight engine, chaincase driveline



Firecat type, Chaincase drive
Crossfires and after 2003 had Diamond drive gearboxes, "lay-down" type engines


F-type and "twin'spar" relating to the beams in the upper engine area, AKA "barney's (no I don't know why) All diamond drive


All from 2012 on up, new true "rider-forward" type chassis like the rest of the industry. More comfortable, less fatigue, better balance, better handling, Basically the cream of the crop
 

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So, the problem at hand.

I'm pretty sure the belt is just hanging thing up on you. Do you have he sled on a stand? Fire it up and let the primary engage, the belt should ride up in the sheaves and the sheaves should adjust accordingly.

No big deal, happens most anytime you replace a belt.

K
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Old ZR types; straight engine, chaincase driveline



Firecat type, Chaincase drive
Crossfires and after 2003 had Diamond drive gearboxes, "lay-down" type engines


F-type and "twin'spar" relating to the beams in the upper engine area, AKA "barney's (no I don't know why) All diamond drive


All from 2012 on up, new true "rider-forward" type chassis like the rest of the industry. More comfortable, less fatigue, better balance, better handling, Basically the cream of the crop
This is fantastic. Really appreciate you taking the time to summarize this. The images are really helpful. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
So, the problem at hand.

I'm pretty sure the belt is just hanging thing up on you. Do you have he sled on a stand? Fire it up and let the primary engage, the belt should ride up in the sheaves and the sheaves should adjust accordingly.

No big deal, happens most anytime you replace a belt.

K
Thank you. I do have the sled on a stand and I goosed the throttle and everything slipped right back into place. Thank you! Good to know this is normal behavior.
 

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No problem. You can work the belt back and forth by hand to get it to ride up too but it's a lot faster and easier to let the engine do it for you.

guudasitgets gave you a good run down of the common AC chassis. The only thing I would kinda disagree with is is 2012+ (Procross) being the first true rider forward. All the Twin Spars (like yours) are rider forward, I would even say they're more rider forward than the Procross. The Procross is a nice compromise IMHO, rider forward but not quite so extreme that it still lets you move around on the seat easily.

K
 

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No problem. You can work the belt back and forth by hand to get it to ride up too but it's a lot faster and easier to let the engine do it for you.

guudasitgets gave you a good run down of the common AC chassis. The only thing I would kinda disagree with is is 2012+ (Procross) being the first true rider forward. All the Twin Spars (like yours) are rider forward, I would even say they're more rider forward than the Procross. The Procross is a nice compromise IMHO, rider forward but not quite so extreme that it still lets you move around on the seat easily.

K
K, thanks for the detail and your take on the rider-forward stance. I'll do some more reading about it. I thought I had heard that Arctic Cat went back to the chain drive at some point. I seem to recall that chain drives are efficient (from a frictional loss standpoint) but the gear case seems a better overall solution to me.
 

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There was nothing wrong with the DiamondDrive system. The chain case that proceeded it was a simple but dated design, at least from a bearing stand point. The DD does like to be serviced but if you keep up with that they hold up well. I know a lot of performance guys were mad at AC going back to the chain case when they did because they had more or less figured out the DD by that point. The new chain case is fine but there's nothing wrong with the DD.

K
 

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Discussion Starter #16
There was nothing wrong with the DiamondDrive system. The chain case that proceeded it was a simple but dated design, at least from a bearing stand point. The DD does like to be serviced but if you keep up with that they hold up well. I know a lot of performance guys were mad at AC going back to the chain case when they did because they had more or less figured out the DD by that point. The new chain case is fine but there's nothing wrong with the DD.

K
Good to know. I did check the gear case oil in the sled and it is clean and at the proper level. Changing that is about the only maintenance item that daunts me a bit. Mostly getting a 600+ lb. sled up on the side to drain it. For as impressed with the overall design of this sled as I have been, this one thing seems a very strange oversight in the design of the DD. Maybe I'm missing a reason why they didn't simply put it on the bottom like the engine oil. Any tips for getting the sled up on one side? Is that a strictly two-man job?
 

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Good to know. I did check the gear case oil in the sled and it is clean and at the proper level. Changing that is about the only maintenance item that daunts me a bit. Mostly getting a 600+ lb. sled up on the side to drain it. For as impressed with the overall design of this sled as I have been, this one thing seems a very strange oversight in the design of the DD. Maybe I'm missing a reason why they didn't simply put it on the bottom like the engine oil. Any tips for getting the sled up on one side? Is that a strictly two-man job?
I have a steel ring sticking out of ceiling in my garage that’s across the roof joists. I use a cable hoist to lift my 2016 Bearcat 570 on its side to attach a drain fitting to DD. It’s great the running boards have holes to hook into. Drop sled, drain and then fill with flush fluid. Run it for a bit with back end raised, then lift sled again to add drain fitting and drop sled to drain flush fluid. Add DD fluid and you’re done. I use the same ring to lift back of sled to remove and service skids. It’s way easier lifting a 700+ lb sled by yourself.
 
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So...the PO of my machine didn't do many things right but one thing he did do is add a drain hole for the DD. Made it same size hole at the engine oil drain holes so you can just use one of those plugs to fill the hole. It's not perfect, I stuff some paper towels around the DD to make sure all the oil ends up going out the custom hole but it works and it's a lot better than tipping the sled over! I did that once...this is better.

Change the oil once a year, use the flush.

K
 

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I have a steel ring sticking out of ceiling in my garage that’s across the roof joists. I use a cable hoist to lift my 2016 Bearcat 570 on its side to attach a drain fitting to DD. It’s great the running boards have holes to hook into. Drop sled, drain and then fill with flush fluid. Run it for a bit with back end raised, then lift sled again to add drain fitting and drop sled to drain flush fluid. Add DD fluid and you’re done. I use the same ring to lift back of sled to remove and service skids. It’s way easier lifting a 700+ lb sled by yourself.
That's a very good idea. Tilting the sled on its side in this way is probably only putting a 2-300 lbs of weight on the beam since the bulk of the weight is in the front and you've always got a ski planted on the ground. Where did you get the ring? The cable hoist is just a manual, mechanical advantage type of deal?
 

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So...the PO of my machine didn't do many things right but one thing he did do is add a drain hole for the DD. Made it same size hole at the engine oil drain holes so you can just use one of those plugs to fill the hole. It's not perfect, I stuff some paper towels around the DD to make sure all the oil ends up going out the custom hole but it works and it's a lot better than tipping the sled over! I did that once...this is better.

Change the oil once a year, use the flush.

K
Makes sense. It begs my original question - why didn't AC put the drain hole there in the first place!?
 
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