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What sort of airflow can you expect through your tranny? Is it dependant on positive pressure on the intake due to speed, or is there some sort of mechanical means to move air through the tranny? Mecanical driven by the engine PTO would be ideal for a ghetto turbo if you could tap into a few PSI at higher RPMs. It should conpensate for warmer intake temps with less than one PSI increase. Don't know if it's feasible, but I've been reading this thread and can't help but wonder. Could someone out there tell me why this is a bad idea?



I'm also questioning the reasoning of extending the tailpipe up instead of down. I've seen water dripping from the tailpipes of enough vehicles to realize you need to allow the condensing water vapor to drain out. Going up won't do that. It may be a better choice to extend the tailpiple down a few inches instead. That way, there would be no condensation buildup and no way for water to climb a column of gas. Sure you will be screwed if your engine stops, but I figured you would be anyway...
 

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as far as the tranny goes you get 2 benifits from the snorks.
1 is you get cool outside air to the clutch,2 there is fins on the inner clutch sheave which if you rev up the eng 2-3000 + rpms you would be suprised how much air flows through the clutch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the reply MM. Any idea how stong a wind it makes? PSI would be great, but CFM will work as well once you know the appetite of the engine you're working with,
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (PBPoison @ Feb 19 2007, 11:53 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
Thanks for the reply MM. Any idea how stong a wind it makes? PSI would be great, but CFM will work as well once you know the appetite of the engine you're working with,[/b]
not sure how much? you would need some sort of a flow bench to measure it.
if your thinking of using this as boost
forget it, there isnt enough there, but a 2in snork moves a suprising amount for what its intended to.
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (PBPoison @ Feb 19 2007, 11:53 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
Any idea how stong a wind it makes?[/b]
"0" PSI...

All you would be doing is directing warm air with rubber dust to your air filter. A centrifugal turbo or supercharger takes at least 10,000 rpm even to begin building pressure, and some turbos spin near 100,000 RPM when fully spooled up. Also, their turbine and it's case is highly engineered for moving a lot of air. It's not just a wheel with fins.
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (onyx_z71 @ Feb 21 2007, 07:33 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (PBPoison @ Feb 19 2007, 11:53 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Any idea how stong a wind it makes?[/b]
I piped in my air box to the belt exhaust and made small fins that i put on my clutch and just snorkled my belt intake it gave me a positve pressure in the air box with the throttle on and i havent had any water in the air box yet and it has been in water to the handle bars, the only down fall is i get bubbles from under the seat
"0" PSI...

All you would be doing is directing warm air with rubber dust to your air filter. A centrifugal turbo or supercharger takes at least 10,000 rpm even to begin building pressure, and some turbos spin near 100,000 RPM when fully spooled up. Also, their turbine and it's case is highly engineered for moving a lot of air. It's not just a wheel with fins.
[/b][/quote]
 

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I piped in my air box to the belt exhaust and made small fins that i put on my clutch and just snorkled my belt intake it gave me a positve pressure in the air box with the throttle on and i havent had any water in the air box yet and it has been in water to the handle bars, the only down fall is i get bubbles from under the seat
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (trailthumper @ Mar 13 2007, 04:11 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
I piped in my air box to the belt exhaust and made small fins that i put on my clutch and just snorkled my belt intake it gave me a positve pressure in the air box with the throttle on and i havent had any water in the air box yet and it has been in water to the handle bars, the only down fall is i get bubbles from under the seat[/b]

Not sure I completely understand what you mean here, but if you have run your belt exhaust directly into the airbox your not helping anything. All your getting is very heated air pressure and as was mentioned before belt particles/dust into your airbox.
 

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Yeah, I'm confused about that as well. The two things you don't want to introduce into your airbox is warm air and obstructions/dirt/junk. If you tied the airbox intake into your belt exhaust, you doubled down on the two things you absolutely don't want.

The turbo effect that you're trying to achieve isn't going to work ideally across the throttle range, as your jetting isn't going to change dynamically with the airflow changes. Even with EFI, I'm not sure if it'll change on the fly like that (unlike an EFI truck/car).
 

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The Turbo/Supercharger usually don't generate any boost below a certain RPM...unless its' a "Roots" type supercharger.... A turbo has to "spool" up before you feel the boost and a centrifugal supercharger, depending on Pulley size, usually generates about 1psi per 1000 rpm's...so at 6000 rpm's it's making roughly 6psi of boost.... your clutch being piped into your intake isn't making any boost because it's not Compressing the air...
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (trailthumper @ Mar 13 2007, 04:11 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
I piped in my air box to the belt exhaust and made small fins that i put on my clutch and just snorkled my belt intake it gave me a positve pressure in the air box with the throttle on and i havent had any water in the air box yet and it has been in water to the handle bars, the only down fall is i get bubbles from under the seat[/b]
the only problem that would stop me from doing that is when the clutches get hot, all that hot air will be sucked into the carb and there goes your performance... for me that would be too much jetting issues to over come... run lean at cold temps until clutches heat up and then a fat condition :imo:


BM...
 

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From My experience with Superchargers/Turbo chargers... Heat isn't as big of an issue as is Running LEAN!! With boost or Positive air pressure the fuel delivery has to be increases...In an EFI engine larger injectors (more fuel volume) and a FUEL MANAGMENT UNIT, larger (more volume) fuel pump need to be added, and then the Spark timing should be reduced...

On a carburater engine the intire carb should be encapsulted to Pressureize the whole unit like the late 60's Paxton Mustangs...

Heat is a consideration as pumping any amount of boost from either a turbo or supercharger increases air temp.. you can increase boost by channeling the compressed air from the turbo or SC thru an intercooler or aftercooler to drop the intake charge temp. example--- 6psi @ 6000 rpms no intercooler 8-9psi (or more)@6000 rpm's with intercooler... Keep in mind anytime you compress air with a turbo or SC air temp increases dramatically!

cooler air is more dense than warm air.... NO2 works about the same way... but in many cases you actually have to warm the NO2 bottle ... In any case of positive air pressure FUEL becomes the main ingredient...
 

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In this ATV application, the heated air from the belt could raise the "normal" air temp by a factor of 100 degrees or more! That would destroy your engine performance. And if you got sunk in a water/mud hole and started smoking your belt....well....good luck with that. :)

Good info Green400.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (trailthumper @ Mar 13 2007, 03:11 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
I piped in my air box to the belt exhaust and made small fins that i put on my clutch and just snorkled my belt intake it gave me a positve pressure in the air box with the throttle on and i havent had any water in the air box yet and it has been in water to the handle bars, the only down fall is i get bubbles from under the seat

I also had to rejet because it did lean out my fuel mixture[/b]
TrailThumper:
It's nice to hear from someone with first hand knowledge on the subject.
So you snorkled your belt intake and ran the belt exhaust to the air box. Sounds like there was enough airflow to make up for the increased intake temps if you were running lean and had to rejet. I'm willing to bet you didn't see any performance loss either, you probably noticed an increase weither it's real or imagined...I don't know what it is about new shoes, but they always make me run faster!!! Bubbles under the seat? Are they caused by a leak letting out some of the positive pressure you have at the air box? Small fins? Possibly small sheet metal L channnel? Did you add the fins to begin with, or realize you were not getting the air flow you had hoped for and add them later?


Anyone else out there do this?
 

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this method you have to worry about belt dust....



BM...
 
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