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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, this is my second full season of riding, and my first sled. I have ridden probably 8 sleds in my life and my AC Cougar, 1996 with about 2300 miles on it is wobbly in the rear end. Especially in and out of the turns.

Now I am a big guy, nearly 300 pounds, and this is by no means a heavy duty sled so I figure I will ask the guys who know what I might want to check or do (besides lose 50 pounds) to help with this issue.

I have new carbide skags on the front (Woody's) and it steers great even on very little sitting down!

I can really lean thru the turns and it holds true, but I have to be careful because every once in a while it will become very unstable and I have to back off. I have learned to compensate for the left front ski always wanting to pull up when I accelerate, but I just need to get some input as to my best alternatives on the rear end.

Is it track tension? Missing Studs? Old worn out shock? (It may have been switched to an old worn out one by the kid I bought it from) He did tell me he moved it up a notch on the shock, which makes it ride a lot higher than my brother in laws EXT 580, which is basically the same sled.

So either I am up riding in a higher center of gravity than I am used to, or I have some loosey goosey problems in the track area.

What does it feel like when bogie wheels go? Is there any standard as to how often you should replace them?

What should I look for when I am checking out the track (with manual in hand) that is not included in the shop manual?

Also, are there any sites that specialize in pro-style skis and suspension for the front end? I want to do the best I can with this suspension with my weight!
 

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Drop your limiter straps a bit in the front, may have to drill holes in the straps. Then all of the track is in contact with the snow. Sounds like you have more pressure in the back, makes it wbbly.
 

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When does it feel 'wobbly'?

Does it happen at a good speed when you let off the throttle suddenly?

If so, it's a combination of too much front skid spring pressure and/or strap length.

When you lift the rear of the sled and let it back down on a flat surface, the straps should be set so that the flat portion of the track touches down front & rear at the same time.

Once you have the straps at the correct length, loosen the front skid spring until it's completley loose. Turn the spring tighter 3-5 turns. Test ride and adjust +/- half-turn accordingly.

The front spring of the skid is not supposed to be a load carrying spring. Load carrying is the job of the rear springs. The front skid spring is only a rail movement control mechanism... If the front of the skid carries the payload, the rear will become less stable.

:chug:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Wow! Fantastic! I didn't expect such great advise so quickly! What a great site! I can see I am going to learn a lot from everyone!

Thanks for taking the time to be helpful!

I will give it all a try, particularly the test of the track... great idea and information!

Plus I didn't know you could adjust the front shocks that way! Again, Thanks!
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (Michicat @ Feb 13 2007, 01:42 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
Wow! Fantastic! I didn't expect such great advise so quickly! What a great site! I can see I am going to learn a lot from everyone!

Thanks for taking the time to be helpful!

I will give it all a try, particularly the test of the track... great idea and information!

Plus I didn't know you could adjust the front shocks that way! Again, Thanks![/b]
Oh, forgot... welcome call to ArcticChat!



Hey, I just re-read my setup suggestion above. Seems I've explained in such a way it might cause a problem for you, so I would like to add/clarify...

When I wrote about the front skid spring, to turn it 'completely loose'... What I meant was to loosen the adjuster until the spring has zero preload tension. If you turn the adjuster all the way to the bottom, it's too far and the upper spring retainer puck might fall out or end up improperly aligned.

Whenever setting up coil springs, start with zero tension and make your turns from there. For the test ride, turn springs +/- half a turn at a time, when you're real close you can fine tune 1/4 turn at a time. One full turn makes a very noticeable difference.

Another thing... When I suggested how to setup the strap length, this depends a lot on the front ski springs already properly adjusted in the 'ball-park'. Because when you lift the rear of the sled, the ski suspension will compress and affect how you 'read' the track's angle relationship with the flat surface. If the ski springs aren't close, you could end up adjusting straps less than optimal.

Similar idea for the ski springs... With the weight off the skis (bellypan supported) turn the adjuster loose to the point where there is no tension on the springs. Then turn up both springs an equal number of turns. Try starting with 3-4 complete turns. Take it for a test ride and adjust +/- as needed to tune out harsh bottoming. If your having trouble turning, skis with an agressive profile are the answer, not increasing ski spring pressure. Too much spring pressure makes the ski suspension ride harsh and requires more muscle to steer.

Your target is to have all the coil springs set as loose as possible without harsh bottoming. Softly bottoming out once in a while is perfectly fine and normal. Softly bottoming out the suspension (front or rear) means you're getting full travel with lightest possible steering.

:chug:
 
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