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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hopefully some will find this helpful.


It is well known that the V2's are geared tall... I'm sure most of you that own or have owned this bike know that 50 mph in low gear is nothing remarkable for these machines. There are a few options available to help with tire turning ability or low end grunt. You have clutching options, and in 06 Arctic Cat introduced the 4.0 gears for the V2... but even then these machines are not up to par with their single cylinder counterparts (in low range, at least).

Within the last few years, there seems to be another option. When Kawasaki introduced their sport UTV the Teryx, they kept the same engine as the Brute Force 750, but nearly doubled the weight. How were they able to get power to the ground with the same engine and same clutch set up? Easy - they lowered the final gear ratio by introducing a different bevel gear set up. A lot of Brute Force drivers drop these Teryx Bevel gears in, and reap the benefits of a super low gear.

Now... the only issue is that the output shafts for 650V2 motor are different. The V2 Kawi motor uses what seems to be a love-joy locking system to keep the driven bevel in place, while the Teryx and Brute use a flange and nut. The bad news about this is that the Teryx gear will not drop directly onto the Arctic Cat output shaft. But, this is something that is easily doable, and requires only a bit of welding to make it work.

So, let's get down to it.

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Why a gear reduction?
- If you have large tires (29.5+), and want to reduce belt problems and issues, or if you just want a real low gear. This is a little more than a 14% reduction. For comparative terms, going to 3.6 to 4.0 gears is about a 11% reduction. A V2 with 4.0's and this reduction will be geared a little bit lower than a 650 H1 with 3.6's.

Parts list (all Kawasaki part numbers):
Kawasaki Teryx Bevel Gears:
49022-0044 GEAR-BEVEL,DRIVE
49022-0045 GEAR-BEVEL,DRIVEN

Shims:
92180-1307 SHIM,DRIVEN,T=0.151
92180-1308 SHIM,DRIVEN,T=0.201
92180-1309 SHIM,DRIVEN,T=0.501
92180-1310 SHIM,DRIVEN,T=0.801
92180-1311 SHIM,DRIVE,T=0.151
92180-1312 SHIM,DRIVE,T=0.201
92180-1313 SHIM,DRIVE,T=0.501
92180-1314 SHIM,DRIVE,T=0.801
92180-1349 SHIM,DRIVEN,T=1.001
92180-1350 SHIM,DRIVEN,T=1.201
92180-1351 SHIM,DRIVE,T=1.001
92180-1352 SHIM,DRIVE,T=1.201


Tools required:
Kawasaki #57001-1482 (a good shop will either loan this out or do the job for you when it's time)
Gear marking compound (tooth paste works just fine)
Dial indicator (you need to set back lash - this is important)


Total cost this will run you about $200-250 depending on where/how you get your parts. Not bad for a gear reduction.
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Now, let's get started.

First, it's going to help, but not be necessary for you to remove your plastics. Your tires/wheels can stay on (honestly this will help). Now, the big kicker - You won't have to remove your engine or split the cases to do this. That's right - the engine can stay in the frame, making this a MUCH easier job. Go ahead and drain the oil out of your engine, you'll lose it anyway since you're opening up the transmission.

Once you are to where you can get started, start by unbolting the engine. There are only 2 bolts, one in the bottom front, another at the top rear. You'll also want to unbolt the exhaust from the frame (two bolts). This will allow you to move the engine and get the drive-shafts off the output shaft. (NOTE: if you for some reason have the rear differential out, you can skip this step, or if you would prefer to just remove the rear differential you can - I think it's easier to move the engine, honestly). Next, unbolt both differentials to allow for slack/movement as well. This also makes it easier to put the driveshafts on/off.

Now, here is what the bevel gears look like as a cross section:

Parts 10 and 15 are what we are replacing with the Teryx gears and part #9 is the through shaft that your driveshafts attach to.


With your engine moving around a bit, go ahead and remove your rear driveshaft from the output shaft. This may require either a jack, engine lifts and/or an extra person. You'll want to slide the engine forward AND up (as the exhaust will hit the frame going directly forward). A pry bar may help a bit. Once the rear driveshaft is off, you can unbolt the 4 10mm headbolts that hold the output shaft in (parts # 1). It will slide right out, as there is nothing on the front holding it back.

Now, you should have this out of your engine (parts 1-14 in the diagram):

note that the front splines are different - this is from a Prairie, but should give you an idea.

Now, we can remove the drive bevel gear. (part 15) This comes out by the dipstick. It will be helpful to remove the floorboard if you haven't done so already. There are 3 bolts that hold the dipstick cover on (8mm), and one that holds the transmission sensor (10mm). Remove the dipstick cover, and remove the circlip/snap ring that holds the starter gear on. Now you should see 4 10mm bolts (part #1 in the earlier diagram). Remove them, and the drive gear holder (part #19) with drive gear will come out with a little coercing and effort.


Now, you should have both gears out:




To remove the driven gear (part #10), you'll need to compress the spring and remove the snap ring that holds it in place. The gear and love-joy style holder will all come off the shaft. To remove the drive gear, you will need the Kawasaki special tool, or to take it to your local Kawasaki dealer. (it's cheaper usually to take it to the dealer - but don't forget to get them to put the Teryx gear in as well!)


So, here is where it gets a little tricky, and you'll have to do some custom work. The Teryx driven bevel gear will not work with the love-joy/spring set up. You will have to press the Teryx gear on (it's a TIGHT fit), and weld it to the shaft once you can shim (DO NOT WELD UNTIL YOU HAVE IT SHIMMED!).

Now, with your Teryx gears in place, all you have to do is set the back lash and tooth contact. Backlash needs to be within .002-.0043 (in), or .05-.11mm. I set mine a little on the tight side (about .0015), but that's because it is difficult to check lash 100% perpendicular, and I prefer to err on the side of caution, as any readings will be artificially lower because of this. Next, you'll have to set the tooth contact pattern. Apply your gear marking compound (or toothpaste - either works) to 4-5 teeth of the driven gear. Now spin the driven gear forward and reverse about 5 times each way (full rotations). Remove the drive gear, and check. Shim accordingly. You want the gears to be touching almost in the middle, if not a bit towards the toe/outside of the drive gear. If you find you don't have enough room to shim, then just move your driven gear up/down the output shaft as needed, then see what you can do. Theoretically, you won't NEED the shims for backlash as much, as you can move the driven gear up and down the shaft by nearly a full half inch. However, I think it's best to get close, and then shim.

Note : Changing driven housing shims will affect backlash more than contact pattern. Changing drive housing shims will affect contact pattern more than backlash. Always recheck backlash anytime you add shims.

With your backlash and tooth contact set, you can now weld the gear in place.

Tips for welding the gear (Big thanks to user Jim Timber):
1. DO NOT WELD until you are sure you can set backlash and tooth contact.
2. Go slow, take your time.
3. When you weld it, you should be careful not to get the gear hot or you'll risk losing that hardness and the teeth will wear quickly. (this may be a good reason to shim on the tight side - it'll be hard to circumvent ALL heat)
4. Weld three little tacks to locate the gear. Let it cool completely. Then come back and put a small bead on one side, let cool completely, do the opposite side, repeat - working your way around the seam. Don't let the gear get over a couple hundred degrees if you can help it.
5. Use TIG if you can, you'll get a better joint, even though it will heat soak more. MIG has problems with cold lap at the start of the weld. With this process using mig, you end up with a lot of non-welded bead over the weldment as a whole.
6. If you want to check balance, put it on a lathe and turn it down. This will require you put more weld on than you want to end up with, but will prevent vibrations and is a very good step to take. However, due to the tight fitment of the gear on the shaft, it's going to be about as balanced as possible. But it never hurts to be sure!

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Now, put it all back together, and you should immediately notice better low end, and a high gear that is useful for something other than top speed racing.

I'm attaching the manual that details bevel gear removal and set up step by step, and may cover any other questions you may have.
The full manual can be found here: (section 3 details bevel gears)
http://dl.dropbox.com/u/22696677/User Service Manual For ARCTIC CAT 650 VT 4X4 FIS Auto - 2004.rar


Now, enjoy your V2!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
An update:

Here are some numbers to give you an idea of what this reduction is doing for you on the bottom end.

Primary reduction (V-belt): 3.122 - 0.635
Final drive ratio 3.6 (36/10) [2004-2005]
4.0 (36/9) [2006]

Range Reduction
High: 3.098 (30/26 x 29/18 x 20/12)
Low: 4.833 (36/20 x 29/18 x 20/12)
Rev: 4.028 (16/12 X 18/16 X 29/18 X 20/12)

Total Reductions (3.6s)
High: 34.819 - 7.082
Low: 54.319 - 11.048
Rev: 45.271 - 9.208

3.6s w/ Teryx 1.909:1 secondary (21/11) [a 14.5% reduction]
High: 39.868 - 8.109
Low: 62.195 - 12.650
Rev: 51.835 - 10.543

With 4.0 gears (stock on 2006 V2s)
High: 38.688 - 7.869
Low: 60.354 - 12.276
Rev: 50.301 - 10.231

With 4.0s & Teryx secondary
High: 44.298 - 9.010
Low: 69.106 - 14.056
Rev: 57.594 - 11.714


So, with 4.0's and the Teryx reduction, your low final drive is about 27% lower than 3.6's and no reduction. For comparison, going from low to high is a 35% reduction. This is very noticeable. However, after the dual reduction (4.0's and the Teryx gears), your high gear is still a good 18% higher than your standard low gear (with 3.6's). So 60+mph speeds are still obtainable (ask me how I know).


So, how does this feel? The reduction itself is immediately noticeable. When shifting into low gear, you get a noticeable pull. Wheelies are definitely possible, even with large and heavy mud tires. High gear is now useful, and isn't just a gear that's in the way anymore (guys with larger mud tires will know what I'm talking about here). Reverse is also doable without burning up belts.


All in all, the Teryx bevel gears and 4.0's are where the V2's should have been at from the factory.
 

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great job!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks... you should give it a try. Rockerdude
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
An update for those of you wondering about speed.

In high gear I can reach 60+ MPH (I backed off) with 29.5 Outlaw 2's, a passenger and no clutch work(all factory). I see no reason why one would want to go faster. In low gear, it winds out pretty quick to around 30 mph.

I must do for any V2 rider that wants a legitimate low gear.
 

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Hey Fred, I'm playing with the idea of installing one reduction, thinking on the 4.0s as they're easier (for me at least) I mostly trail ride, have 26s and don't plan on going any bigger than 27" in the future, will the 4.0s make a good difference for mild rock climbing? Mostly exploring river beds with big boulders and old mining roads....
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Short answer : Absolutely.

However, I think the Teryx reduction is more bang for your buck. It's (in my opinion) easier to install, can be cheaper (especially if you choose to do a full 4.0 diff swap), and gives you about a 4% lower reduction to boot. Only issue you may have is the welding, but using my notes any welder would be able to do a good job with it.


Here's what you are looking at:
4.0 reduction : 11%
Teryx reduction : 14.5%

As far as cost goes... if you do just the 9t pinions and not the full differentials the 4.0 will run you about $250 for the pinion gears and shims. The Teryx gears will run you about $300. (price has went up). However, if you do the full 4.0 differential swap (which is honestly a better route), you are looking at upwards of $900 easy. $350 a pop for the ring gears and the $120 or so for the pinions.

As far as ease to install... the Teryx reduction is easier in all honesty. You only have to pull the rear differential (or unbolt the engine) so you can slide the bevel gear shaft out, and remove the floorboard to get the driven gear. That's it. With the diff swap... well, that's two differentials, a-arm removal, front actuator, diff lock, etc...

So I would honestly suggest the Teryx gears for you. Cost is very close, performance will be better, and it's easier to install (imo).
 
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thanks man...

I'll definitely look into that...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Teryx reduction is more beneficial from a cost/benefit standpoint, I think. Either way, let me know and I'll be glad to help you.
 

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so i am about to start trying to get all the parts together for this project and just have a couple quick questions. First off are you removing all of the plastic or just the back and the floor pans, as thats all i really can take off with relocated rad and speaker system on front rack.next are you loosening both diffs? next how dificult is this whole operation, i seem to understand all of it but the backlash and shims think i will have to find someone with a dial indicator to figure that outbut besides that think it should be a good project to do over the next month before muddygras
 

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Jfred isn't around here much anymore. You can find him on highlifter once in a while
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Jfred isn't around here much anymore. You can find him on highlifter once in a while
But I still get Arctic Chat emails!

so i am about to start trying to get all the parts together for this project and just have a couple quick questions. First off are you removing all of the plastic or just the back and the floor pans, as thats all i really can take off with relocated rad and speaker system on front rack.next are you loosening both diffs? next how dificult is this whole operation, i seem to understand all of it but the backlash and shims think i will have to find someone with a dial indicator to figure that outbut besides that think it should be a good project to do over the next month before muddygras

I honestly found the welding to be the biggest issue. Shimming was just annoying, but not insanely difficult. I had all the plastics removed because I was setting valve lash and cleaning up the fuel pump. However I think you only have to remove the left (passenger) floorboards. It's much easier with the rear diff removed, but it can be done without. Though to be honest it may be best just to snatch it and the driveshaft out looking back on it. You can just remove the rear diff and driveshaft, and the output shaft will pop right out. No need to shift the engine around.
 

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But I still get Arctic Chat emails!




I honestly found the welding to be the biggest issue. Shimming was just annoying, but not insanely difficult. I had all the plastics removed because I was setting valve lash and cleaning up the fuel pump. However I think you only have to remove the left (passenger) floorboards. It's much easier with the rear diff removed, but it can be done without. Though to be honest it may be best just to snatch it and the driveshaft out looking back on it. You can just remove the rear diff and driveshaft, and the output shaft will pop right out. No need to shift the engine around.

racetex, if you want to give me call any day after 5 pm feel free to do so. 478 866 0009
- Josh
Hey Josh,
Thanks I have a good friend who owns a machine shop and is going to do my welding for me so not really worried about that part, just figuring out the backlash will be my main hurdle, and I think I will just tear down the rear end and pull the rear diff, I think I got a small leak on my rear drive shaft anyway that needs a seal replaced. Thanks for the Help I might give you a call sometime
Mike
 
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So i am about order parts, dose it matter what year Teryx i get the parts for? it looks like gears work for 08-13
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Mike, I did the same thing with the welding. My buddy also does machine work, and he was able to press it on and let me shim it, and then later weld once the shimming was correct.

As long as the part numbers are the same you should be fine. I bought my Teryx gears used on the cheap, don't even know what year they were for. So you should be set.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Man, Photobucket really made this thread useless...
 

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Awesome to see you again!!
 
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