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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello! I got an e-mail from my dealer today on how to read the error codes on a 2009 - 2010 Arctic cat with an EFI engine. So i thought I'd translate it to English and put it up here. NOTE: I'm not the best in English so if you see anything that's written bad or wrong please tell me. ^^

NOTE: The parts in the text that are coloured green is written by Wyo_H1_Cat, all credit goes to him for that! Clap

General Info:

- If there is an error code on a sensor, the sensor shouldn't be replaced right away, it has to be measured and checked according to the service manual.
- In most cases it can be a different voltage output causing the error code, which means you can delete the error code without having to replace the sensor.

There are two types of EFI codes, ACXXX are active codes and could affect how it runs, An AC code always means something is wrong or failed the on-board diagnostics check.

The second type of code is a SCXXX code, These are stored codes and means at one point you had an active code that self cleared, Also means whatever set the original AC code may repeat again. Normally SC code do not affect how it runs but should be considered a warning that a AC code once existed and may happen again. Or take it as maybe something is starting to fail.

European Arcitc Cats:

HOW TO DELETE THE ERROR CODE:
1. Ignition has to be off, you also have to have it in 2WD.
2. Plug in the diagnostic plug into the contact which can be located under the seat. (I use a paperclip for this).

This is the contact that's under the seat close to the fuse box.

This is where you plug in the paperclip or a wire if you don't have the diagnostic plug.
3. Since there isn't any "reverse override button" on the EFI models. You have to connect some wires that are under the seat. Disconnect the black contact from the other black contact, and then put the black contact into the blue contact. On the 700 EFI models, the Panther and the Cruiser the wires are white/green and red/green. That means the white contact should be connected with the red/green contact.

Picture of the wires.
4. Change from 2WD to 4WD
5. Turn on the ignition and let it be on for at least 10 - 15 seconds until you get the AC00 message in your display.
6. Reconnect the wires under the seat.
7. Disconnect the diagnostic plug (or the paperclip if you used that).
8. Your error codes should be deleted now.
9. Battery cables can also be disconnected for a couple of seconds.

American Arctic Cats:

To clear all codes, with the key off, install the diagnostic jumper, then press and hold in the reverse override button and turn on the key. Wait 10-15 seconds or so. Turn off key & release reverse override button. This should clear all SC codes to an ACOO on display next time you check codes. Some models may require you to also have the 4x4 switch in 4x4 position, Mine does not. I think in the service manual the procedure is written different in the newer manuals where it also says to place the 4x4 switch in 4x4 mode as well.

Codes and different solutions to some of them:


If battery voltage drops below 10-10.5 volts while trying to start the engine you'll get the "VOLT" and or "EFI" displayed on the Pod and this may set an AC code or result in a SC codes being stored. Most of the time the cause of this is nothing more than a partially discharged good battery that needs charged or a BAD battery that needs replaced. You may also get a "VOLT" error if the voltage regulator fails or the battery terminals are loose and the ECU senses a voltage over 16-16.5 volts. Many times this also causes the LCD pod to fail and have no display because the pod shuts off to prevent damage from over voltage. Jump starting from a running automobile often results in this and is known by many to fry voltage regulators too. The alternator from a running automobile can deliver huge amounts of amperage into an electrical system on your ATV that isn't designed to handle that much power.

"EFI" can also happen if you turn the key on and off too quick, or try to start it immediately after turning the key on because the ECU was unable to complete its self diagnostic routine. Always wait for the needle to stop jumping around and LCD displays normally before pressing the start button. This gives the diagnostics check time to complete it's routine and gives the time necessary for the ECU to read all its sensors and set up fuel table parameters for a cold or hot start-up. The ECU is just like your computer, it needs to fully Boot-Up before you use it.
 

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WARNING SOME ECU'S CAN BE DAMAGED BY FOLLOWING THIS CLEAR CODES PROCEDURE.

This procedure is only for the older ecu found on older cats. CHECK WITH the SERVICE MANUAL to see is this procedure is applicable to your year and model BEFORE proceeding.

Mine looks like a paper clip, because it is a paper clip. That procedure to clear codes that Nemi posted is for the European cats. Not quite the same for North American Cats. You can find the NA procedure in the service Manuel that you can down load from this pinned section. also edited this post to show the procedure.

There are two types of EFI codes, ACXXX are active codes and could affect how it runs, An AC code always means something is wrong or failed the on-board diagnostics check.

The second type of code is a SCXXX code, These are stored codes and means at one point you had an active code that self cleared, Also means whatever set the original AC code may repeat again. Normally SC code do not affect how it runs but should be considered a warning that a AC code once existed and may happen again. Or take it as maybe something is starting to fail. MAYBE.

To clear all codes, with the key off, install the diagnostic jumper, then press and hold in the reverse override button and turn on the key. Wait 10-15 seconds or so. Turn off key & release reverse override button. This should clear all SC codes to an ACOO on display next time you check codes. Some models may require you to also have the 4x4 switch in 4x4 position, Mine does not. I think in the service manual the procedure is written different in the newer manuals where it also says to place the 4x4 switch in 4x4 mode as well????? European models are different Guess they do not have a reverse override button at all?

If battery voltage drops below 10-10.5 volts while trying to start the engine you'll get the "VOLT" and or "EFI" displayed on the Pod and this may set an AC code or result in a SC codes being stored. Most of the time the cause of this is nothing more than a partially discharged good battery that needs charged or a BAD battery that needs replaced. You may also get a "VOLT" error if the voltage regulator fails or the battery terminals are loose and the ECU senses a voltage over 16-16.5 volts. Many times this also causes the LCD pod to fail and have no display because the pod shuts off to prevent damage from over voltage. Jump starting from a running automobile often results in this and is known by many to fry voltage regulators too. The alternator from a running automobile can deliver huge amounts of amperage into an electrical system on your ATV that isn't designed to handle that much power.

"EFI" can also happen if you turn the key on and off too quick, or try to start it immediately after turning the key on because the ECU was unable to complete its self diagnostic routine. Always wait for the needle to stop jumping around and LCD displays normally before pressing the start button. This gives the diagnostics check time to complete it's routine and gives the time necessary for the ECU to read all its sensors and set up fuel table parameters for a cold or hot start-up. The ECU is just like your computer, it needs to fully Boot-Up before you use it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I don't know if its the same on all models, here is what it looks like on my 2010 700 h1

Here is the contact under the seat:

And here is how i get the code by using a paperclip or a wire:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Nicely written Wyo ^^ on the different Arctic Cat ATV's ive seen in Norway i haven't seen a single one with an reverse override button.

If an Admin wants to they can change the topic title or ad europe models to it.
 

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LOL paper clip!!
Ok now can you tell me how the first 2 letters of the code mean and how do I check codes...clear codes...reset the IAC...and set the throttle position sensor.

This is looking like its going to become a STICKY lol
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I couldn't find the SC0630 code on the list i posted or the one in the Arctic cat manual sticky in the pinned section. Maybe someone else can help on that one :/

And if you read Wyo_H1_Cat's post you can see how to reset the code on a US AC quad.
 

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If your EFI codes are 3 or 4 digit codes check this list.
http://www.arcticchat.com/forum/pinned-topics/278017-efi-malfunction-codes-950-h2-please-make-sticky.html#post2163313

P0630-Vin Not Programmed or Incompatible.
I don't really understand what this code would mean or if it complies with your issue/machine. Much of what is inside that black box is a mystery too all.

Looking at the wiring diagram on my Tcat the ECU and the Pod communicate back and forth it appears. not sure if it is the same on yours or not. Maybe there is a loose or corroded connection between the two. Have you either replaced the pod or ECU?

Error codes from the 2009 service manual
• 00 = No Fault Detected (active code only)
• 12 = CKP (Crankshaft Position) Sensor*
• 13 = APS (Air Pressure Sensor) - H1
• 13 = MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) Sensor - H2
• 14 = TPS (Throttle Position Sensor)
• 15 = ECT (Engine Coolant Temperature) Sensor
• 16 = Speed Sensor
• 21 = IAT (Inlet Air Temperature) Sensor
• 23 = Tilt Sensor*
• 24 = Ignition Coil #1*
• 26 = Ignition Coil #2* - H2
• 32 = Fuel Injector #1*
• 34 = Fuel Injector #2* - H2
• 40 = ISC (Idle Speed Control) Valve
• 41 = Fuel Pump Relay*
• 60 = Cooling Fan Relay
• 95 = Sensor Power
• 96 = Incorrect ECU*
• 97 = ECU Memory Power (constant battery power)


About battery's and state of charge with EFI.

EFI needs a good battery and a fully charged battery. Below 10.5 volts sensed by the ECU will cause a VOLT error to show up on the display and may cause the EFI error to appear as well. Before getting overly concerned about EFI error codes make sure your battery is fully charged, 20 hours at a 2 amp rate will do it. A lot of EFI problems are cured with a new fresh battery.

Batteries have two important ratings and several other less important ratings such as Reserve capacity, Cycle rating, and others. These ratings also assume a fully charged battery in a New condition. All Batteries weaken with age and use. They loose both the ability to deliver high amperage and they loose storage capacity. From listening to the sound of you cranking the engine over and hearing it slow, your battery is either not fully recharged, been abused or is old and worn out. Recharge it and have it load tested, chances are, it needs replaced.

1. CCA or Cold Cranking Amperage, what this is is the maximum amount of amperage the battery can deliver for 30 seconds at zero (0) degrees F without dropping below a specified cutoff voltage. The temperature is mostly just a guide line to use for winter use and CCA should be higher at room temperatures up to some maximum temperature where it will fall off also. It takes a lot of amperage or power to crank an engine over, I've never measured on my cats it but assume it is at least 100 Amps, maybe as high as 200 amps of initial load. If the battery has weak CCA, or not fully charged it may may turn the engine over slowly or not at all. A load test can per performed to determine the health of a battery at most automotive part venders.

2. Amp/Hour rating or Capacity. The amp-hour rating for a given battery is the amount of Amps that can be consumed over a period of time until the battery is considered discharged. If you have a 20 amp hour battery you could place a 20 amp continuous load upon it and in 1 hour it would be fully discharged. If your starter is using 200 amps (example only) when you crank the engine over you would fully discharge the battery is 6 minutes. Only 12 minutes if the starter is using 100 amps. Similar usage time for winches. Every time a battery is discharged it looses some of its capacity and CCA rating. Every battery as a set number +/- of discharge/recharge cycles exceed that number and the battery has reached it end of it's life. Some batteries are built to last a high number of cycles, such as the Odyssey. The Odyssey also survives abuse very well.

The inverse is also true, a 20 amp hour battery will require 1 hour to recharge at a 20 amp rate, 10 hours at a 2 amp rate or 20 hours at a 1 amp rate. Do not try to recharge one of these small batteries at 20 amps, it will probably fry it and ruin it. Although some brands can handle higher charge rates. The maximum charge rate is usually 10-15% of its capacity or 2 to 3 amps maximum and often a label is found on the battery showing maximum charge rate for that battery. Exceeding maximum charge rate can destroy a battery or at minimum harm it.

A battery will still show a voltage when its in a state of discharge or drained and may even increase to almost 11-12 volts after a period of rest and that is known be a third rating called reserve capacity or recovery. For the most part though the battery is not going to do much, It is drained of power and does not have the ability to do work even though it has a voltage its electron tank is empty. The amp/hour rating of these small batteries used in Arctic Aats range from about a low of 15 A/H to maybe as high as 25 A/H. In my opinion higher is better just like a big fuel tank is better than a small fuel tank for going the distance. CCA ratings probably range from a low of around 150 to maybe 600-800. with the norm being 200-400 CCA The PC-680 has a 680 CCA rating. At first that sounds great but you'll never need it, if your starter draws a maximum of 175 amps the maximum that will be drawn from the battery is 175 amps. A Battery will not deliver more amperage then what is asked from it. Even a fully charged PC-680 that has a 680 CCA rating will only deliver what is asked from it, 175 in this example. The rest of the available CCA overkill and never used. Those who deep cycle (discharge) their batteries often via excessive winch use would probably be better off with the PC-680 because the 680 can withstand deep discharge cycles much better then most other batteries.

Abuse a battery and a new battery may only last a few months. Abuse can include Deep discharge, Extended winch use, Storing while discharged, Over charging or Jump starting at high amperage/voltage. Understand the limitations of these batteries and it will last for years, If you typically abuse batteries purchase a PC680. If you want to maximize capacity get the Motobatt with 25 amp/hour capacity. both the 680 and the 25 A/H Motobatt are big in size. Measure to make sure they fit. I've read here where the TRV models have smaller battery boxes then the non TRV models. I don't know this for sure myself. Either the 680 or the big MB will fit my H1 or H2 with no issues.

Tips

Never store a battery or let it sit for long periods if not fully recharged. Fully charged at rest key off voltage is 12.1 to 12.5 volts.
All batteries will loose charge when stored, even with nothing connected to them. Use a battery maintainer when in storage.
The Clock in the display pod does drain your battery over time. Use a battery maintainer when in storage
If the length of the ride is short, Make sure the battery is fully recharged after each use with a charger or maintainer.
Never exceed the maximum charge rate for the battery when charging. May cause the battery to overheat and short out a cell internally and/or builds sulfates on the plates reducing capacity.
Keep the top of the battery Clean, Dirt, swamp mud and moisture is a conductor and will discharge the battery and cause power robbing corrosion.
Never jump start from a running automobile. If the ATV battery is fully drained I wouldn't even jump start from a non running automobile since that big car battery may be fully charged and capable of hitting the small battery with a excessive damaging amperage. A large auto battery may be rated at over 1000 CCA. when connected to a dead or deeply discharged ATV battery something could FRY. When running, an auto alternator may dump a huge amount of amperage(100-200 amps) into the small atv battery, overheat it, and warp the plates, at least it could or will shorten the batteries life significantly and may fry the voltage regulator and or burn stator wiring and cause other strange electrical problems.

Some science of why jump starting can harm your battery. Over simplified, and there are other factors not included here. Basic Ohm's law is still applicable for an understand of why jump starting is bad.

Batteries have an internal resistance. You cannot measure it directly with an ohm meter. Assume it's there and the amount of resistance is probably well under 1 ohm. For this example assume .1 ohm or 1/10 of 1 ohm of resistance. Assume your ATV battery is deeply discharged and has a at rest voltage of 7 volts across the terminals. A running automotive alternator has a voltage of around 14.5 volts and capable of delivering as high as 200 amps at this voltage. What is the differential voltage between the non running near dead ATV battery (7 Volts) and the running automobile? (14.5 volts)

ANSWER: 7.5 volts, is the differential voltage between the ATV battery and the running automobile.

Using ohms law, Current equals Voltage divided by Resistance. Plugging in the above numbers we have. 7.5 volts differential, divided by .1 oms battery resistance, equals 75 Amps of current being dumped into your ATV battery and the ATV's electrical system. Something could FRY and often does fry. If the Automobile is Not running its a little better, however still excessive in this example. With the car engine off it may have a voltage of 12.5 volts and the battery is able to deliver a high amperage considering the size and CCA rating of the car battery. In this case if the ATV battery was at 7 volts the differential is now at 5.5 volts or 5.5 / .1 = 55 amps. Still dangerously high with the atv battery being at 7 volts initially although better then 75 amps. The amount of amperage dumped into the ATV would be much worse of the ATV battery voltage was lower and a whole lot better of the ATV amperage was higher. 10-10.5 Volts across the ATV battery is probably low enough that the ATV will not crank over very well, if at all and may just have solenoid chatter. Jump starting from a non running automobile you'd have a voltage differential of 2.0 to 2.5 volts resulting in approximately 20-25 amps and 40-45 amps when the automobile was running. Still sounds high. With the automobile engine off it probably not fry things for the short duration. With the engine on, In my opinion you are taking chances of cooking something. I'm thinking those cases where we've read about voltage regulators being fried is when the ATV battery was at a very low voltage. Maybe resulting from leaving the key on overnight, lights on or the hand warmers on and the ATV battery voltage is near ZERO. 14.5 Volts in to a ATV battery sitting at 0 to 1 volt is 135-145 amps. SOMETHING is GOING to FRY or MELT.
 

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*********************************************************************************
WARNING SOME ECU's CAN BE DESTROYED IF YOU USE THE WRONG PROCEDURE TO READ AND CLEAR CODES.
*********************************************************************************
CHECK WITH YOU SERVICE MANUAL BEFORE PROCEEDING


Check the service manual FIRST to see if you can safely use the clear codes procedure listed below.
EFI trouble shooting via the diagnostic plug. Short pigtail from fuse box area with rubber cap on it. You jumper two of the wires together with either the factory diagnostic plug or A paper clip is what I use. If like my 08 tcat, there are 3 wires going to a 6 hole connector. X= a wire 0 no wire in connector. Other machines such as the 700H1 may have more wires in the plug but I think its the same two wires. Check the service manual to make sure. I'm guessing here since I've never seen the diagnostic plug on anything other then a 08 Tcat.

X0
00
XX <- Jumper these two together to read EFI codes, set throttle position sensor or to set Throttle range. You jumper the same two wires to read and clear EFI Stored or Active Codes ACXX ECXX,or SCXX where xx is some number representing some EFI or sensor fault. Code tables are in the service manual and is often posted in other threads on this site. The pinned section has a service manual that you can download if you do not have one. I recommend you get a service manual for your ATV model and year just in case the code table is different or procedures have changed.

There is also a little horizontal bar that is displayed. Left of the ACXX. This bar jumps up or down to one of 3 positions as the throttle is moved. It should light up in the center position when the throttle position sensor correctly is set while applying no throttle. To Set the Throttle position sensor, First make sure the battery is fully charged loosen the screws holding the sensor to the throttle body and rotate the sensor left or right until the bar shows in the center position while applying no throttle. (Very tiny amount of movement needed) Then tighten the screws making sure the bar stays centered. Always re-set throttle range after doing this so the ECU knows how much signal fron the position sensor represents full throttle.

This is done by, jumping the diagnostic plug wires under the seat to put the ECU in diagnostic mode. Then with the key off press the throttle wide open and hold it, turn the key on wait at least 10 to 15 seconds, turn the key off. Then release the throttle. This sets idle speed and Calibrates the ECU to the trottle range sensor so it knows what the throttle position is and what the range is. Necessary for the ECU to be able to deliver the correct amount of fuel at various amounts of throttle opening. It also sets the idle speed control motor so the engine idles at the correct speed.

If there are any Active Codes there should be EFI on the pod display. I'm pretty sure (least what I've convinced myself) SC codes don't trigger the EFI on the display but must be cleared to get the ECU to back to full normal operation. So if you've ever seen a EFI on the pod then later disappears it's probably set a SC code that needs to be cleared. To read codes install the jumper and turn on the ignition switch but not started. All clear should show EC00 or AC00 on the pod. Anything else is ECU fault or a sensor failure somewhere. SC codes are historical AC codes that are no longer active. To clear all codes install diagnostic jumper and press and hold the reverse override switch as you turn the key on, wait 10-15 seconds and then turn key off. Remove jumper and run the engine until fully warmed up. Then check the codes again if everything is good it should show an EC00 (maybe AC00 on some) Anything else you still have problems that need to be tracked down. I've made it a routine to periodically check for EFI codes, check the throttle position sensor and reset the throttle range as preventive maintenance
 

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HERE'S some pictures of the diagnostic plug. Pic #4 it's installed and its reading on the POD
 

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