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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The other day I disasembled my hex clutch, and ordered the parts to rebuild it. Are there any tricks I should know about when assembling? I think I read here somewhere that the bushings can be hard to get in straight. Also, are the new bushings notched to accept the set screws in their original holes or do I have to drill and tap new ones?

Thanks
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (AzCats @ Jan 19 2007, 10:15 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
Lot's of Tricks !

First of all, after removing the old bushings, inspect the bores of the sheaves for cracks.
If there are any do not procede. The new bushings may or may not come with pre drilled
"half holes". Clean up the hex shaft with wet/dry sandpaper or Scotch Brite. The bushings
do not like to start straight. There is a special tool for pulling them in. You can improvise
by making one using a bolt, nut, large flat washers and a socket that is slightly larger than
the bushing. If the bushings come pre drilled, the three holes may not line up perfectly with
the ones in the clutch pieces. Rotating them sometimes helps. Put a real light film of Loctite
on the bore of the inner sheave and just partially press the inner half bushing in place.
Place it on the hex shaft. Install the spider and tighten. Apply thin film of Loctite to the outer
half bore and slightly press the outer half bushing in place and place it on the hex shaft.
The reason not to press them in all the way is you need to "synchronize" the alignment of
the two bushings and the centering of the spider rollers on the ramps. Rotate the clutch
halves as necessary to line everything up including the holes in the outer cover where the
three bolts go in. I like to offset the rollers a little to the right of the ramps as you face the
outer half so under load or as the new bushings wear they will be lined up better. When
everything is lined up, remove the clutch halves and press/pull the bushings the rest of the
way in. Next step is to put some threads in the bushing "half hole" with the correct tap.
Do this with the bushing on the hex shaft because as you tap it the tap likes to push the
bushing downward. This is tricky and does not come out perfect. The goal is to try to line
the tap threads up with the ones allready in the aluminum part. Do not run the tap all the
way through, only far enough to get the set screws all the way in. I also like to use set
screws a little longer than the ones that came out. It gives a little extra strength to the
assembly. Apply Loctite to the set screws and install also while the covers over the hex shaft
to prevent the screws from trying to push the bushing downward. Allow the Loctite to set up
in a heated area for 12 hours and you should be ready to go.

When doing all of this, the three aluminum pulley pieces have alignment marks on them.
It is important they be lined up during final assembly to keep the clutch balanced.


Good Luck !

Tom[/b]

Wow....thanks a bunch Tom! :thumbsup:

I've been working with these hex clutchs all these years now and finally some one has a procedure to install those @*@%*@ clutch bushings.....fantastic!

Thanks for sharing!

JMY
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I got my new bushings today and they have no half holes. How do you get the half holes in them?Or do you just drill new holes once there in?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I got all my bushings and set screws in and lined up, but my cover bushing is very tight on the shaft! The shaft is spotless, and I don't think I distorted the bushing with the set screws. I'd hate to start filling that new bushing but what else can I do?
 

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We are so anal we drilled and tapped our half holes in the bushing last year for my 340 Jag. We also rigged up a deal to install the bushing absolutely straight using a home made tool the right diameter and a big Dake Arbor press. So far, 250 miles later, no problems. This bushing was one of the rare fiberglas/plastic HD jobs that you can't get anymore. The white stock plastic ones sold in the Hiperf Eng catalogs can run sloppy in clearance specs. Some day I want to find the original HD material sold to racers in the mid 70's and make a set. But when you take one of these apart, take a Sharpie and mark what came off what so it all goes back the same way, for balance. Some times the casting marks are hard to see so I like a second set to double check.
 
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