Arctic Chat : Arctic Cat Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2018 crosstre Icefish Dec 2019.jpg k 8000 with about 1000 miles on it. While warming sled up to come in from fishing shack low temp alarm was on red flashing light started running on one cylinder......limped it home on one cylinder it wasn't very far. Changed the spark plugs the next day now runs fine again. It is no longer an easy task to change plugs on these new sleds.....definitely not something you would want to try to do on the trail on a cold day. I replaced the plugs with stock BPR9ES. Is anyone using the iridium version BPR9EIX to help prevent fouling ? I ride a lot out in the wilderness & don't want this happening again out in the middle of nowhere.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
7. Fine Center Wire/Ground Wire – originally designed to improve starting and anti-fouling characteristics in small 2-stroke engines. The small center electrode reduces the voltage required to fire the gap. A smaller cross sectional area ground and center wire can also give a more stable ignition resulting in less cycle variations. Another advantage is that the smaller (.052″ vs. .100″) center wire allows the insulator to be smaller in diameter which increases the bore clearance volume, this results in allowing more fuel charge in and out of the plug which helps to keep it clean, resisting fouling, and gives it better exposure to the fuel for improved ignitability. These plugs have been tested and proven to be able to fire under greater pressures than the std. dia. center wire plugs with similar ignition systems. https://www.vdlfuelsystems.com/anything-and-everything-you-want-to-know-about-spark-plugs/ Looks like there are various opinions on this spark plug subject. Above is an exert where some research was done to back up this opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
970 Posts
Sounds good in theory, but I do not have any real world experience, nor have heard of anyone who has & had good results with BPR9EIX.
Every 2 stroke Arctic that I've owned, including our current ZR6000's, have run BR9EYA's



I've only fouled one plug, BR9EYA, in over 20 years. That was on a 40+ degree day with my ZRT600.

Biggest offender, in fouled plugs, in not warming up after start up. And warmed up does not mean the temperature light turns off.
That means coolant temperatures around 120 degrees+ before shut down.

If you do decide to try the BPR9EIX, please report back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Frozen Tows......do you have a C-tec2 800 that you are using the PR9EYA spark plugs in? Previously I owned a 2010 XF800 suzuki which I used the BR9EYA plugs in & never had a problem with a fouled plug in 5000 miles. Now I own a 2018 C-Tec2 800 and fouled a stock plug BPR9ES in 1000 miles. Possibly the rich break in settings may have caused premature fouling and I put in a new set but was wandering if anyone else has had success with the BPR9EIX or the BR9EYA in the C-Tec2 800
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
2,551 Posts
Sounds good in theory, but I do not have any real world experience, nor have heard of anyone who has & had good results with BPR9EIX.
Every 2 stroke Arctic that I've owned, including our current ZR6000's, have run BR9EYA's



I've only fouled one plug, BR9EYA, in over 20 years. That was on a 40+ degree day with my ZRT600.

Biggest offender, in fouled plugs, in not warming up after start up. And warmed up does not mean the temperature light turns off.
That means coolant temperatures around 120 degrees+ before shut down.

If you do decide to try the BPR9EIX, please report back.
BR is the wrong plug for a ctec2 engine. You should to run BPR
P is for projected tip
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,026 Posts
7. Fine Center Wire/Ground Wire – originally designed to improve starting and anti-fouling characteristics in small 2-stroke engines. The small center electrode reduces the voltage required to fire the gap. A smaller cross sectional area ground and center wire can also give a more stable ignition resulting in less cycle variations. Another advantage is that the smaller (.052″ vs. .100″) center wire allows the insulator to be smaller in diameter which increases the bore clearance volume, this results in allowing more fuel charge in and out of the plug which helps to keep it clean, resisting fouling, and gives it better exposure to the fuel for improved ignitability. These plugs have been tested and proven to be able to fire under greater pressures than the std. dia. center wire plugs with similar ignition systems. https://www.vdlfuelsystems.com/anything-and-everything-you-want-to-know-about-spark-plugs/ Looks like there are various opinions on this spark plug subject. Above is an exert where some research was done to back up this opinion.
Those fine wire plugs are used mostly for severe duty racing applications, as that fine core tip builds heat quicker (for jetting checks) vs what standard diameter core plugs do.

And for that “experts” opinion of smaller insulator diameters.... ???
No such thing....
He’s no more of an expert on spark plugs than I am at being a shoe salesman... ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
970 Posts
Frozen Tows......do you have a C-tec2 800 that you are using the PR9EYA spark plugs in? Previously I owned a 2010 XF800 suzuki which I used the BR9EYA plugs in & never had a problem with a fouled plug in 5000 miles. Now I own a 2018 C-Tec2 800 and fouled a stock plug BPR9ES in 1000 miles. Possibly the rich break in settings may have caused premature fouling and I put in a new set but was wandering if anyone else has had success with the BPR9EIX or the BR9EYA in the C-Tec2 800
Ours are C-Tec 6000's. No experience with the 800's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
970 Posts
BR is the wrong plug for a ctec2 engine. You should to run BPR
P is for projected tip
Do you know why the projected porcelain tip is important?
When I changed to the EYA's vs ES's they looked the same except for the "V" in the electrode.
I didn't notice the porcelain was longer on the ES's.

Machine seems to like the BR9EYA's. At least for the past 400 miles this season.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
271 Posts
There’s almost a 1/8 of a inch difference between the porcelain on both plugs. The porcelain on the BPR9ES protrudes a 1/16 pass the base and the BR9EYA is a 1/16 below base.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
2,551 Posts
The heat range and installation is the same, the difference is where in the combustion chamber the gap is.

Sent from my Pixel 4 using Tapatalk
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
7,946 Posts
Listen to C-Note, he knows his stuff. And like the others are saying BPR9ES
 
  • Like
Reactions: C-note

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,026 Posts
Thanks, Randy.

The biggest reason they went away from the EYA’s to the other, was to utilize the extended porcelain projecting further into (like Krom says) the combustion chamber to help in keeping the core metal hotter versus the EYA’s tendency to have cooler core wire temps due to fuel “quenching” every intake cycle in the chamber.

This all helps with producing cleaner emissions in the long run.

The eya’s, while getting “quenched” at the core wire, were still very good at keeping “deposits” from reaching the cooler (deeper) insulator due to much further reach (and heat made during combustion), and fouling.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,026 Posts
Used to have this link in my sig (back in the good old days), but here’s a very interesting read for anyone who’s worried about fouling plugs.


I installed a set onto my brand new 2010 500 SP the third day I owned it, and am still running the same exact plugs in it that it came with.
And if anyone in here knows how rich the mapping was in the 2010’s, that’s testimony as to how well they work! No matter how hard some a-holes in that thread tried to discredit them, they’re worth their weight in gold to me.... ??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
I have a 2018 crosstre View attachment 362633 k 8000 with about 1000 miles on it. While warming sled up to come in from fishing shack low temp alarm was on red flashing light started running on one cylinder......limped it home on one cylinder it wasn't very far. Changed the spark plugs the next day now runs fine again. It is no longer an easy task to change plugs on these new sleds.....definitely not something you would want to try to do on the trail on a cold day. I replaced the plugs with stock BPR9ES. Is anyone using the iridium version BPR9EIX to help prevent fouling ? I ride a lot out in the wilderness & don't want this happening again out in the middle of nowhere.
Hey just wondering the same i bought a 2019 highcountry 8000 with 254 miles on it, put another 200 miles fouled 4 plugs all on the clutch side i am pissed thing i bought the sled with this problem
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
After fouling a plug at 1000 miles I installed new BPR9ES plugs. I now have 2500 miles on the sled & haven't fouled another plug. When I am waiting for the warm up light to go out as soon as the engine idles down to about 1700rpm I put a little throttle into it about 2200rpm until the warm up light goes out. Not sure if that helps or not but it is what I am doing & haven't fouled another plug.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top