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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone wondering about air problems with the cooling system on the F1000 and any 07 F series sled should read the post titled "1000 Cat Engine Burn Downs! One Possible Cause!". This post is found in this site under general snowmobile discussion; then go to Cat service bulletins and recalls.

Crossfire ECU: word has it the Crossfire 1000's have the same fuel map and timing curve as the M series sleds. What does this mean? It means that the sled has to much timing and is to lean for low elevation running. The end result is lean burn down!
 

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The crossfire has the same map as the M because it has the same engine, exhaust and intake as the M, The beauty of EFI is that it adjusts for elevation and temp changes automaticly.
 

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listen to krom he knows what he is talking about Arctic Cat is one of the few sled man. to dyno test and produce all their engines to run on 87 octane fuel. they dont put higher compression heads on there mountain sleds because of 5,000 plus alt. Arctic motors all with the exception of the race sleds only need good old 87 some sled might run better with 91 like the 4 strokers and maybe the 800 with the det sensor but they all make stated hp with 87.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You are probably right about the low end and mid-range of the Crossfire fuel map but, dyno testing has shown that these sleds are leaner at wide open throttle than the F1000's. If you install any mods such as the y-pipe and do not use a control box (boondocker), there's a good chance it will blow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Krom, you are absolutely correct about the ability of the EFI systems to automatically adjust to changes in conditions and, you are also correct about the same design shared by the M and Crossfire sleds. However, your statement is mis-leading to those who do not understand why and how the fuel map and timing curves differ between sleds (M series) intended for high elevation running where the air density is lower and less fuel is needed, and sleds that are mapped and timed to be run at lower elevation where air density is much higher and more fuel is needed. The amount of fuel that can be delivered to the engine at differant operating ranges is solely controlled by the fuel map and it is not infinite or unlimited meaning it can only richen the amount of fuel delivered to the engine based on the maximum duty cycle allowed by the fuel map. If the map is leaner at any given range; you get less fuel (leaner). Dyno testing has shown that the Crossfire's at wide open throttle are leaner than the F1000 and some of the mod shops have indicated that if any mods such as the Y-pipe are installed, more fuel is needed at "WOT."
 
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