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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

I'm thinking about trying a driveshaft saver.
I have a new sled with zero miles. It seems like this would be the best time to take action.
I've been through quite a few Procross sleds (fourteen) with good luck on driveshafts. I had one that spun at 8,600 miles. The odds aren't too bad, but I also like the idea of being proactive.

I've found a couple different versions of driveshaft savers to try if I go that route.
I like the thought of using the B.O.P. version.
They basically invented the idea. They have revised the design as well. Usually, the second version is better for a reason. It is hard to argue with the logic.

I've also run across Precision.
The Precision version is a bit less expensive. The description is focused at the 4S sleds. (That part is confusing since the 2S sleds should have the same driveshaft specs.) It may just be a simple oversight, but it brings up other questions.

The revised BOP version is a bit longer which makes sense. The expansion should be focused at the bearing location. I have not found any size dimensions for the Precision version. I'm not sure if the expansion is centered under the bearing?

I'm curious to see what other riders have tried and what were their findings?
Product comparison. Installation tips. Things to watch.
 

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I had a local machine shop repair my shaft and he told me to use permatex sleeve retainer, kinda like lock tite. He repairs a lot of planetary gear sets and it will hold the bearing from spinning and it can be taken apart again. Hope he's right.
 

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Hi All,

I'm thinking about trying a driveshaft saver.
I have a new sled with zero miles. It seems like this would be the best time to take action.
I've been through quite a few Procross sleds (fourteen) with good luck on driveshafts. I had one that spun at 8,600 miles. The odds aren't too bad, but I also like the idea of being proactive.

I've found a couple different versions of driveshaft savers to try if I go that route.
I like the thought of using the B.O.P. version.
They basically invented the idea. They have revised the design as well. Usually, the second version is better for a reason. It is hard to argue with the logic.

I've also run across Precision.
The Precision version is a bit less expensive. The description is focused at the 4S sleds. (That part is confusing since the 2S sleds should have the same driveshaft specs.) It may just be a simple oversight, but it brings up other questions.

The revised BOP version is a bit longer which makes sense. The expansion should be focused at the bearing location. I have not found any size dimensions for the Precision version. I'm not sure if the expansion is centered under the bearing?

I'm curious to see what other riders have tried and what were their findings?
Product comparison. Installation tips. Things to watch.
I bought and installed the BOP (quick and easy install). He did the legwork to develop it and, as a matter of principle, I refuse to support parasites who steal ideas.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The sleeve retainer/loctite idea makes sense if it holds. Sure can't beat the cost.
I'm curious @Gary6741 , how tight was the bearing after they did the repair? There is a rather large range of manufacturing tolerance in these shafts. I can see the method working if the initial fit is relatively tight. I'm not sure if I would feel comfortable if I had one of the looser fitting shaft assemblies. That also brings up the difficulty in deciding what to do. I don't know how to check the fit without taking apart the assembly. I do like the idea because it is only directed at holding the bearing/shaft assembly. The brake rotor should be still be free to move.

@mikstr , I have to admit that I also appreciate those that did the legwork. We wouldn't see these ideas without the building and testing.
Do you also have the vented rotor? I'm curious because they really seem to like floating on the shaft. Just wondering how you determined the torque to grab the bearing and let the rotor float? I'm a little familiar with the issue because I had one sled with a driveshaft slightly off true. The brakes sucked until the rotor/shaft splines started to wear in and let the rotor float. The brakes worked great after the splines "wore" a bit. In retrospect, I would have replaced the drive shaft early if I knew what the heck was happening.
 

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They told me they made the shaft about 1/2 of a thousand of an inch larger than it was, as measured at a spot that wasn't damaged. It fits tight. Haven't put it together yet, got it back only 2 days ago. Like you, wanted to check it as some preventive maintenance, could feel a vibration in the handle bars at certain speeds. Shaft was worn about 20 thousands guessing it had just started. The bearing was fine, putting a new one in anyway.
 

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The sleeve retainer/loctite idea makes sense if it holds. Sure can't beat the cost.
I'm curious @Gary6741 , how tight was the bearing after they did the repair? There is a rather large range of manufacturing tolerance in these shafts. I can see the method working if the initial fit is relatively tight. I'm not sure if I would feel comfortable if I had one of the looser fitting shaft assemblies. That also brings up the difficulty in deciding what to do. I don't know how to check the fit without taking apart the assembly. I do like the idea because it is only directed at holding the bearing/shaft assembly. The brake rotor should be still be free to move.

@mikstr , I have to admit that I also appreciate those that did the legwork. We wouldn't see these ideas without the building and testing.
Do you also have the vented rotor? I'm curious because they really seem to like floating on the shaft. Just wondering how you determined the torque to grab the bearing and let the rotor float? I'm a little familiar with the issue because I had one sled with a driveshaft slightly off true. The brakes sucked until the rotor/shaft splines started to wear in and let the rotor float. The brakes worked great after the splines "wore" a bit. In retrospect, I would have replaced the drive shaft early if I knew what the heck was happening.
I torqued it to 45 lbs as instructed. Works fine (and yes, I have an R XC so I have the vented/lightweight rotor)
 

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Installed correctly, the Barn of Parts Drive Shaft Saver will not affect the rotor at all.
Two machines, 2 brand new shafts & bearings, installed fall of 2020.
Bearing got snug at less than 20ftlbs.
I too locked them down to 45ftlbs.

It's safe to say that a brand new zero mile machine will be fine at 45ftlbs.

The wedge is the most logical solution in my opinion.
I do not want to glue the bearing to the shaft. More hassle removing later.
I do not want to send shaft & bearing out to be pinned. More hassle & expense later.

My next machine will have the Barn of Parts Drive Shaft Saver also.
Unless Arctic makes it standard issue as thy should.
 
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