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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey, question for people with clutch experience. 14 zr el Tigre 6000 Ctec 2 sled has over 4000 miles on it. When I shift from forward to reverse it clunks. Which from what I read is normal as the helix doesn’t sit in the rollers all the way. Lately I noticed sometimes my clutch engagement sounds the same way. Is my secondary spring getting weak and not keeping the rollers on the helix? Thanks.
 

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This has been moved to the zr thread.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Should also mention the sled has “rattle” today is sounded like a bag of bolts bouncing around. Only seem to notice it at Low speeds after that sounds smooth at high rpm or can’t hear it over the can
 

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Hey, question for people with clutch experience. 14 zr el Tigre 6000 Ctec 2 sled has over 4000 miles on it. When I shift from forward to reverse it clunks. Which from what I read is normal as the helix doesn’t sit in the rollers all the way. Lately I noticed sometimes my clutch engagement sounds the same way. Is my secondary spring getting weak and not keeping the rollers on the helix? Thanks.
Could very well be spring weakening. Could also be very filthy (built up belt and brake dust) prematurely wearing away at spiders plastic thrust buttons and the aluminum surfaces they contact, creating major slop (free play) that they aren’t supposed to have.

Do you hear this clunk as engine changes directions (or when you are applying throttle AFTER switching engine directions)??
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Could very well be spring weakening. Could also be very filthy (built up belt and brake dust) prematurely wearing away at spiders plastic thrust buttons and the aluminum surfaces they contact, creating major slop (free play) that they aren’t supposed to have.

Do you hear this clunk as engine changes directions (or when you are applying throttle AFTER switching engine directions)??
You can hear the primary rattle a little at idle but more so just after clutch engagement till about 5k. I cleaned the primary 2 weeks ago when I first noticed it. There is a bit of side to side play between the towers and the buttons. Was tighter at the bottom than the top. I did not clean the secondary as I Haven’t taken one apart before. I blow my clutches out after every ride. Would my primary or secondary spring be weakening or both? It doesn’t seem to affect performance at all just kinda concerning hearing these noises. Yesterday pulled 8150-8200
 

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Discussion Starter #7
You can hear the primary rattle a little at idle but more so just after clutch engagement till about 5k. I cleaned the primary 2 weeks ago when I first noticed it. There is a bit of side to side play between the towers and the buttons. Was tighter at the bottom than the top. I did not clean the secondary as I Haven’t taken one apart before. I blow my clutches out after every ride. Would my primary or secondary spring be weakening or both? It doesn’t seem to affect performance at all just kinda concerning hearing these noises. Yesterday pulled 8150-8200
Also under the impression you can’t get buttons for the newer clutch and some even said just replace the clutch as it was easier than taking the spider off and doing it all
 

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There are no OEM parts available for Cat clutches.
If the rpm is steady, and the spider rollers, and weights are ok, just run it until they go bad, and replace the entire thing.
 

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The lower speed noises you are hearing are more than likely the rapid chattering that’s created when belt is in its lowest ratio (and the excess deflection is being taken in by the secondary as it backshifts under a light load)

Do this, raise rear to get track sufficiently off ground, start sled with left side cover off, have someone operate throttle gently (like trying to move sled just above it’s engagement rpm range while gently applying light brake lever pressure)
This will emulate moving at slow speeds with a light load. Watch the belt on the bottom as it gets taken into the secondary, you’ll notice it does it in a very rapid (and chattery) grab-slack-grab-slack-grab repetitious sort of pattern.

Any slack in the primary can become amplified by this pattern. Not much you can do about how the secondary gobbles the deflection, only how much noise the primary makes due to excessive clearances.

From what I’ve noted in past on many sleds of the ProCross design (brake rotor being right there also), the rotor can also add its .02 cents as the splines grease dries up and fit becomes looser and the rotor and splines begin chattering during the above scenario as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The lower speed noises you are hearing are more than likely the rapid chattering that’s created when belt is in its lowest ratio (and the excess deflection is being taken in by the secondary as it backshifts under a light load)

Do this, raise rear to get track sufficiently off ground, start sled with left side cover off, have someone operate throttle gently (like trying to move sled just above it’s engagement rpm range while gently applying light brake lever pressure)
This will emulate moving at slow speeds with a light load. Watch the belt on the bottom as it gets taken into the secondary, you’ll notice it does it in a very rapid (and chattery) grab-slack-grab-slack-grab repetitious sort of pattern.

Any slack in the primary can become amplified by this pattern. Not much you can do about how the secondary gobbles the deflection, only how much noise the primary makes due to excessive clearances.

From what I’ve noted in past on many sleds of the ProCross design (brake rotor being right there also), the rotor can also add its .02 cents as the splines grease dries up and fit becomes looser and the rotor and splines begin chattering during the above scenario as well.
Thanks will take a look tomorrow after work. I did change my track this year and I don’t think there was much grease if any on the brake rotor. Would u be concerned by the rattling or just run it
 

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My suggested cure is to apply black RTV silicone to the splines, making sure all spline grooves are filled, allow it to cure for 1-2 hours, followed by installing the rotor itself.
Let it finish curing 24 hours and this will make for rubber vibration isolator effect.
I’ve done this to many of these. Still allows rotor removal in future with lack of rust/corrosion building up.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
My suggested cure is to apply black RTV silicone to the splines, making sure all spline grooves are filled, allow it to cure for 1-2 hours, followed by installing the rotor itself.
Let it finish curing 24 hours and this will make for rubber vibration isolator effect.
I’ve done this to many of these. Still allows rotor removal in future with lack of rust/corrosion building up.
i worked on the machine tonight. There is a Little play somewhere on the jack shaft. Which I understand is normal? The rotor has very very minimal play. Running the machine the primary is definitely the main cause of the rattle. It clears up at 3250 roughly. I have about 6-9 thousandths between the buttons. So with the primary being worn and still seeing 8200 rpm and it running normal is there an issue other than the annoying rattle or is something gonna fail potentially and cause a bunch of damage
 

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If the buttons are worn that bad, it means the aluminum towers are as well.
Just run it until you can’t stand it any longer then replace it. I mean, don’t let it get so bad that you risk blowing up the clutch. Just keep an ear towards it and when the chatter gets pretty bad, that’ll be the time.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
If the buttons are worn that bad, it means the aluminum towers are as well.
Just run it until you can’t stand it any longer then replace it. I mean, don’t let it get so bad that you risk blowing up the clutch. Just keep an ear towards it and when the chatter gets pretty bad, that’ll be the time.
Right on thanks again for your help
 
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