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Man, I've read almost all of the posts for this thread and feel like an idiot. Not sure I'll ever figure out all the specifics of what you guys are talking about?
I bought a used '04 650 V2 a while back and it had been abused by the farmer that owned it. But I bought it anyway and have nursed her back to pretty good shape, even though she does require more upkeep than my '05 400 that I bought brand new.
But back to this thread. Since I bought it, the right front tire was always sitting at an odd angle and I assumed it was just a shock or something. It drove ok, although a bit tough to turn, she was a stable ride, especially on turns at higher speeds.
Two weeks ago, while cruising a ranch road I've never been on, I was between 10 -15 mph when I suddenly found myself going into a large sinkhole. I didn't have time to react, other than try to get off before it went end over front. Luckily, that didn't happen, but when the dust settled, the lower A arm on the right side had broken free at the front mount bracket. The upper A arm was bent along with the tie rod.
Long story short, got the parts in, fabricated a new bracket and welded in place. Put it back together and obviously the toe in was was off. The right front tire was pointing off to the right about 5 degrees.
I printed out the instructions from the repair manual, and proceeded to set the toe in. I originally set it at 1/8" toe in, the book recommends 1/4". Took it for a test drive in my yard and it felt like I had powersteering, she'll turn on a dime.
When I got up to about 10 mph and attempted a left turn, she almost flipped on me, from BLQ to FRQ. Scared the crap of me. We made another adjustment and set it at the recommended 1/4" and it's a little better, but she sill feels way too responsive to me.
I drove her today and got up to about 20 mph and she still wanted to dive to the right or left with just minimum input on the handle bars.
After reading the posts on here, I feel like I need to start from scratch on both sides and check both camber and castor, but it seems pretty complicated. I'm not a bad mechanic, do all of my own repair work, but I'm terrible at math and geometry.
I guess my first question is, should she be this light on the response? Was she just in such bad shape when I got her that I assumed the way she was steering before the mishap was normal when in reality, the way she is now is the correct setup?
I read where one guy set his front springs at 3 and the rear at 5. I have my front at 1 and the rear at 5.

Any advice would be appreciated, and I know, 'don't drive off in a sink hole knucklhead!'
 

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I just wanted to weigh in on the Castor mod myself. I got the very high quality RTR bushing set including the steerlights. It does decrease steering effort at speed nicely, but for my 500 with heavier tires, its not THAT big but its good.

However, bar whip is quite significantly increased at lower speed, hitting a log at lower speed tried to rip the bars hard out of my hands, I also dropped a tire at low speed into a gully and it violently pulled the bars, I've driven this thing a lot on the stock castor and it didn't react nearly this strong before (I do have play in my front bearings and ball joints but its not that bad)

I can see now the stock castor is a compromise between steering effort, and anti-bar-whip with the AC stock components, its heavy steering, much more so then any other quad I've driven, BUT it did keep bar whip minimized over the Castor mod. Most of the time it was better, but occasionally I wasn't ready for it, RIP! Shows me how good powersteering is in general really.
 
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