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Hi again,
This is a stupid question Im sure but w/ the 2007 400 & 500's they offer a non automatic. Can you tell me if this is a conventional tranny like a bike w/ a clutch 1 down 4 up set up or is it no clutch just shift as needed? Also can you tell me the pros & cons of each AT & Non AT? Thanks a bunch. This will make going to the dealer tomorrow a little less painful. :thumbsup:
 

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The manual tranny of the Cat 4x4's have an auto clutch, so you just give it gas and shift, no clutching to worry about.
The big pro of the auto tranny is there is no need to shift and the ATV is always "in the power". The con is that you now have belt and clutch maintence and the potential for more slip plus water take in. For the manual shift you can get caught a gear high and bog down and the "bother" of having to shift. Its really all a personal preference.
 

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I have ridden both and feel that the 400 and 500's seem to feel faster and more powerful with the manual. The bigger bikes (650 +) are great with the autos but I would go with the manual on the 400 or 500. Just my opinion.
 

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Choosing between manual and auto will depend on your ATV uses and your riding preferences. If you will be mostly trail riding and doing casual chores around a camp or farm, the auto will be fine. The auto is quite a bit heavier and a couple hundred bucks more than a manual. Due to the fact that it does not have a transmission full of gears, it also runs on 2.5 litres of oil vs. 3.4 litres in the manual. The belt will require maintenance and is subject to slipping if it gets wet. The auto also requires more engine rpm to get the machine moving thus more noise and probably more fuel consumption. The auto is great for inexperienced riders by allowing them to focus on handling and safely operating the machine rather than shifting and experimenting with gear selection. The down side of that is that new riders will not learn how to operate a manual transmission. By the way the ATV world is going, that likely won't be much of an issue. Manuals are getting harder to find all the time and probably will be even more scarce in the future.

If you have motorcycle experience as I do, you might prefer the manual. All the gear shifts are sequentially up 1 to 5. TNo clutching required account the ATV's have a centrifugal clutch. Just back off the gas a little and shift. The biggest advantage of the manual to me is that you can get the machine moving at lower rpm, keep the machine at extremely slow speeds and lower rpm which is quieter and great for hunting or just crawling along. In the hands of a good shifter, the manual should also out accelerate the auto and attain a slightly higher top speed. If you also plan on heavy work around a camp or farm and you know how to use a transmission, the manual is the way to go. Other than oil changes, the transmission will not require normal maintenance. Choosing the 400 or the 500 is also dependent on your personal preference. The 500 will outperform the 400 in just about every aspect other than possibly fuel consumption. The 400 will be less money, lighter and simpler to maintain. Both machines are a good choice in either configuration. Make yourself a list of what you will be doing then pick the machine that will suit your needs best. After that, make your decision will be what you want vs what you need.

Good luck.
 
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