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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How do you adjust the AWS5 front suspension on a 2000 zrt 800. My front end is like flat with not much movement on the trail, I hope the shocks is not shot - how do I tell. Compared to my old 2001, which had the same suspension this one seems worse. I know the sled is a tank but I'm trying to get some movement to absorb some of the crappy trail conditions we have right now. thanks
 

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The front shocks are only preload adjustable. To soften the ride turn the spring so there is less tension on it and vise-versa for stiffening up the ride. Your 2000 should have the ACT shocks front and rear, these shocks are rebuildable and more then likely in need of it. It makes a huge difference in the ride of an older sled thumbguy
 

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Definitely have your shocks serviced. A fresh nitrogen charge will likely do wonders for your ride height. Not to mention the new oil and possibly new seals will make a world of difference in rideability.
As mentioned, rotate the coil spring to turn the adjuster and add pre-load. Short of that replace those tired coils with fresh new ones. Not too pricey a proposition.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Sled only has 725 miles on it, would they go bad just sitting around?
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (Snatchdaddy @ Jan 10 2007, 02:37 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
Sled only has 725 miles on it, would they go bad just sitting around?[/b]
Sleds 7-8 years old. If they've never been serviced, yes the nitrogen could be low. And the oil could be sludge. Seals are likely okay though.
 

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Can you compress the suspension by pushing down on the front bumper? The shocks should be rebuilt every year, but you can sometimes get a couple years out of them. Fresh oil, seals and nitrogen gas make a huge difference in how the shock functions. Ride height is set by the springs and if there is too much preload they will be stiff and travel can be reduced. Take the shocks off the sled and see if have full range of motion from the a-arms, to be certain they are not binding, or being inhibited in any way. Low miles can be a problem for a snowmobile because it may not have been well cared for while not being used. Seals can dry and fail from lack of use and internal components can corrode.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I will check into it further when I get by the sled. The sled is sitting in Northern WI with NO Fricken Snow...what bullshizit. Looks like I'll have plenty of time to rebuild the shocks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Is $50 US - too much per shock to recharge each. $70 to do the seals each. Anybody want to make some mod money?
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (Snatchdaddy @ Jan 12 2007, 09:47 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
Is $50 US - too much per shock to recharge each. $70 to do the seals each. Anybody want to make some mod money?[/b]
That does sound a little high $$$ wise for a recharge or rebuild. Last time I had my shocks done at a local dealer here they are 25-30 (canadian) to have recharged per shock. The Outdoor Shop (a site sponsor here) does shock rebuilding, check it out on the website >>HERE<<
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (Snatchdaddy @ Jan 12 2007, 07:47 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
Is $50 US - too much per shock to recharge each. $70 to do the seals each. Anybody want to make some mod money?[/b]
Way too much for a recharge. I think anything is too much for a recharge because just recharging is a waste of money IMO. If your shock needs recharging then the oil is contaminated and that means the seals have failed. When you have the shocks serviced you want to have them rebuilt, which is new seals, oil and nitrogen, and any additional parts that may have failed. I get mine done at my dealer and it is usually around $50 - 60 CDN per shock. Some of the last reports I remember from guys in the US is round $30 - 40 per shock.
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (Snatchdaddy @ Jan 10 2007, 01:37 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
Sled only has 725 miles on it, would they go bad just sitting around?[/b]

I've got friends that make good side money recharging Polaris and Cat shocks that were flat when the sled left the crate. They should always be serviced after a couple hundred miles and than annually or whatever you're comfortable with.
 
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