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Well I've finally upgraded from my 83 Yamaha Bravo 250! I just got a 2004 F5, and all I can say is WOW! I've only been out on it 3 times, and I'm scared to go above 55 (my old one barely broke 40), I'm afraid something is going to explode.
Anyway, I have been surfing the forums here (awesome by the way) and I have the following questions:
1) is there an air temp that is too hot or too cold to run the sled in? is it more prone to overheating when the outside temp is about freezing? (the bravo didn't run very well when it was warmer than -10C)
2) how long does the belt last under normal circumstances?
3) is it easy to install the 4th wheel kit? do you have to take the track off to do so?
4) how do you prepare the sled for storage, specifically fogging the engine?
5) any theft issues to worry about, are these easy to steal?
6) what do these sleds have a tendency to get stuck in... anything? the bravo does not like wet heavy snow!
7) anyone know what the gas millage is roughly?
8) any other recommendations or tips?
Thanks for any answers you can give.
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (fisheye4 @ Mar 9 2007, 10:50 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
Well I've finally upgraded from my 83 Yamaha Bravo 250! I just got a 2004 F5, and all I can say is WOW! I've only been out on it 3 times, and I'm scared to go above 55 (my old one barely broke 40), I'm afraid something is going to explode.
Anyway, I have been surfing the forums here (awesome by the way) and I have the following questions:
1) is there an air temp that is too hot or too cold to run the sled in? is it more prone to overheating when the outside temp is about freezing? (the bravo didn't run very well when it was warmer than -10C)
2) how long does the belt last under normal circumstances?
3) is it easy to install the 4th wheel kit? do you have to take the track off to do so?
4) how do you prepare the sled for storage, specifically fogging the engine?
5) any theft issues to worry about, are these easy to steal?
6) what do these sleds have a tendency to get stuck in... anything? the bravo does not like wet heavy snow!
7) anyone know what the gas millage is roughly?
8) any other recommendations or tips?
Thanks for any answers you can give.[/b]
I'll try and give some short answers to your questions
1)if the jetting is stock you should be good to go, the f5 is more prone to overheating in low snow
2)belt will last a long time if it is properly broken in
3)I've been told they are simple to install
4)look in the owners manual
5)simple to steal, lift hood and unplug 1 wire going to key and start
6)if you have 1.375 track or studded 1 inch track they don't get stuck very easy! otherwise just be careful in deep snow and ice
7)10-15 depending on rider style and conditions
8)lots of carbide up front(6 inch min.), learn how to adjust your suspension, keep up on the mainteance and it's a good sled. keep an eye on your idler wheels, retorque all the nuts and bolts on the skid from time to time, read the owners manual.
 

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idler wheels have been an issue on the firecats,,cheap bearings in them and they like to fall off, sometimes they get jammed up in the suspnsion and track and cause damage...inexpensive and simple to replace but it sucks if they wreck your track!!I had one get jammed up inside the suspension and it tore my inner drive lugs of my track off, now I know that I have to keep an eye on those!!!

what I mean by the rear skid is the rear suspension system,rails,hyfax, shocks,springs,limiter straps,etc.. keep an eye on all that stuff. make sure all the nuts and bolts are properly torqued and keep it greased(has fittings) familiarize yourself with the skid so you can do preventative mainteance on it.. these are really,really good sleds and they hold up very well to abuse, but they do require some upkeep to keep them running perfect. A high percentage of problems with snowmobiles are totally preventable by being in the know and doing the mainteance. these firecats have a lot of race blood in them so upkeep is critical for reliability..fortunately, the firecat is relatively simple to work on.just start with the basics and work your way up, for starters the owners manual is full of info, the full out shop manual is a good read too and worth every penny. The sled is much more enjoyable if it is in like new running condition and you will feel proud that you are in the know and did much of the work yourself to keep it that way.
 
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