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The throttle cable on my 99 ZRT 600 is sticking, whats everyone use as a lubricant?? I normaly use PB Blaster on most things, but on somethings its not to friendly and I wasn't sure about the coating of the cables. I had the cables off of the carbs and they hang up at one point and you can see rust when you squeeze the throttle lever so I was going to try some lube before I replace them. Thanks
 

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If your sure its the cables and not some little bur in your carbs, I would stay away for pb blaster, dont get me wrong pb works on everything awesome,I would go with some wd40 being water displacement, and also corrosion resistant.
If you can access the block were the three cables come to one, use some lithium grease.
this should help you out.
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (biggjay96x @ Feb 11 2007, 12:10 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
If your sure its the cables and not some little bur in your carbs, I would stay away for pb blaster, dont get me wrong pb works on everything awesome,I would go with some wd40 being water displacement, and also corrosion resistant.
If you can access the block were the three cables come to one, use some lithium grease.
this should help you out.[/b]

already did the block were the three come together with the white lithium grease and the problem isn't there and I know it's not the carbs I've had the cables off and it still does it. I have CRC silicone or PB Blaster but wanted to see what everyone else used to get the best choices
 

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I would be wary of WD40. It was designed to prevent corrosion on electical components, I believe.
When the solvents evaporate off, it leaves a sticky residue. Attracts all sorts of
crud. In my wannabe benchrest shooting days, when I brought out a can of WD40
and sprayed it on my expensive action, the experienced shooters next to me
cringed like I was throwing sand in my gun, and educated me on proper lubes.

Point is, WD40 will work for a little while, then make things much worse. I put a supplemental spring
attached to the oil injector arm on one of my sleds when the cable was sticking. After a little
use, the cable freed up and I took the spring off. Best thing is to replace the cable with a new
OEM-genuine. Used genuine is better than most new aftermarket, in my experience.
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (ac bigbore @ Feb 11 2007, 10:32 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
I would be wary of WD40. It was designed to prevent corrosion on electical components, I believe.
When the solvents evaporate off, it leaves a sticky residue. Attracts all sorts of
crud. In my wannabe benchrest shooting days, when I brought out a can of WD40
and sprayed it on my expensive action, the experienced shooters next to me
cringed like I was throwing sand in my gun, and educated me on proper lubes.

Point is, WD40 will work for a little while, then make things much worse. I put a supplemental spring
attached to the oil injector arm on one of my sleds when the cable was sticking. After a little
use, the cable freed up and I took the spring off. Best thing is to replace the cable with a new
OEM-genuine. Used genuine is better than most new aftermarket, in my experience.[/b]
While this may vary depending on the application, WD-40 remains effective even after it appears to dry. The corrosion and rust protection ingredients remain adhered to the surface. External conditions may, of course, require additional applications of WD-40 for maximum protection
 

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<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (ac bigbore @ Feb 11 2007, 10:32 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div>
...I brought out a can of WD40
and sprayed it on my expensive action, the experienced shooters next to me
cringed like I was throwing sand in my gun, and educated me on proper lubes.

WD40 will work for a little while, then make things much worse.

Best thing is to replace the cable with a new
OEM-genuine[/b]
I was also warned once about corrosive lubes like WD-40. I didn't heed the advice until I was educated about acidic oils.

Corrosive? How can that be??? Isn't WD-40 just oil?

Any penetrating oil claiming to free up rusted parts, bolts, screws etc. has been formulated to be corrosive with acidic additives. That's how it breaks down the rust. Yes, never use it on firearms unless you need to free a rusted fastener.

A long time ago at a friend's place, we talked about old mechanical technologies. He brought out this amazing brass balance beam weigh scale handed down to him from his great grandfather. The scale was an incredible work of art as well as being an example of metallurgy & machining technologies of the mid 1800's.

He brought it out, set it on the coffee table, and proceeded to show me how it works... But couldn't get it to make the 'fine' movements. He couldn't set the pointer to zero, the movement seemed very sticky. He ran off saying he'll be back with the fix. He came back with a can of WD-40.

Before I had a chance to warn him, he was spraying WD-40 onto the conical pivot points... They were made of high carbon steel conical pins that sat in concave/conical 'cups'. The entire balance beam pivoted at this pin/cup assembly. It was manufactured to a highly accurate tolerance.

Well he sprayed a tiny bit on them and yes, the movement of the scale did free up but still wasn't perfect. I went on to tell him about the corrosive properties of WD-40 that are formulated to break down ferrous metals (any alloy with iron).

His response was "No way. I've been using WD-40 for years on this thing, it works great!"

Well, he didn't know it at this moment, but spraying WD-40 on it is exactly what has been destroying the precision parts.

I asked if he had a good magnifying glass and if we could have a close look at the conical pins & cups. He did have one, went to get it.

We pulled the parts off the scale and closely inspected the pins & cups. They looked heavily pitted, rough, cratered like swiss cheese at the surface. This was the result of years of his acidic penetrating oil corroding the iron molecules out of the high-carbon hardened steel pins. The corroded pins & cups was the reason his scale has lost it's fine accurate movement.

Ever see those white utility vans with the long rust mark streaks on the paint below the hinges? When I worked in construction, there was this one crew that always sprayed their rear door hinges with WD-40. It was literally eating the iron out of the hinges. The other utility vans the company owned didn't have any rusty streaks on the paint below the hinges at all, and that was without anyone adding any lube.

Penetrating oils dissolve ferrous metals. It's made to, that's how it breaks rusted bolts free. But it will also eat iron out of stuff you are trying to preserve. It just happens slowly over a long time so most don't notice and only observe the immediate lubing benefits of the oil.

First time I was educated about penetrating oils was in all the automotive tech classes I took many years ago. There was actually a month long module all about lubes. From that point on, I learned to think of rust-busting penetrating oils as if they were an acid with an oil additive because that's basically what they are.

Many oils are thin enough to penetrate & lube... Not all penetrating oils are acidic. Not all of them clearly state acidity on the label. The clue is, if it says it breaks rusted bolts, it's acidic. Some penetrating oils are designed to lube & displace water only. These are not acidic.

Modern throttle cables have a Teflon/poly liner between the center core & outer sheath... They require no lube, the Teflon liner is the 'lube'. When the Teflon liner is worn through it may get sticky and exhibit the same problems that plagued the throttle cables of the 60's & 70's. just replace the cable. Especially if it's a throttle cable.

In the 60's & 70's, it was common for throttle cables to get sticky or seize because there was no Teflon/PE liner. It was metal on metal. You had to lube them, and they still got sticky because the oil would trap water too. Even then, using an acidic oil was a bad idea.

If I was you, I wouldn't mess around lubing any throttle cable on a machine that has the power to kill. Push mower? Fine. Leaf blower? Fine. These are things you don't put your life on so a stuck throttle won't hurt or kill anyone.

If it is sticking, the Teflon liner is shot and no oil will heal it. It can get sticky again, and for throttles on a machine that has the power to kill, this introduces a potentially dangerous situation. Someone could get hurt. For the price, it's worth the safety factor and peace of mind knowing that the new cable won't stick while someone is riding the machine.

:chug:
 
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