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Discussion Starter #1
I just passed the 6,000 mile mark on my 16 7000 eltigre. I managed about 2,800 miles this year. I'm done for the season, and will jump into a maintenance teardown. Looking it over, it shows no signs of wear, anywhere on the sled. Even the hyfax look like new. I figure I'll change the jackshaft and driveshaft bearings, any seals in the area, have the shocks rebuilt, and I think I'll pop off the valve cover to check the valve adjustment. I will also pull the clutches and check their condition. All in all, I've been very happy with the sled. It took a bit of getting used to following my 2 1100na's, but with each passing mile, I got to appreciate it more. The reason for the teardown now is that next season, if it is a good one, I could put on another 3,000 or more miles. Also the bearings, etc will be 5 years old by then, and adding the miles to the age, I think it's time. As I get into it, I'll report the findings of what is, or isn't good.
 

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Good write-up. Definitely look into those driveline bearings as I blew my brake-side bearing at 7540mi. Check driveshaft for any bearing spin on the brake side as well. My AC clutch is still very solid with no wear marks on the face. I bought the 7000 sled with the intention to keep it as a second sled for a long time.
 

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I think my '15 Pantera had one rough bearing when I swapped out all driveline bearings at 6200 miles. I look forward to your updates.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well, between looking for toilet paper, and trying to keep life somewhat normal, I haven't had too much time to continue with this project. Here's what I found so far; I removed the skid shocks, my rebuild guy said the front shock oil was black, and the rear QS3 was slightly contaminated, but not horrible like the other. I left the front QS3's alone for now. The chaincase side jackshaft bearing had a bit of a hitch in it, but the clutch side felt good. I had been removing the seal from that bearing and greasing it, when I could. Of course I'm changing them all now. I hope to check the valves over the weekend. The green powdercoating on the skid is holding up very well, it looks kike it did when it had no miles on it. I'm really impressed with that. More updates coming soon.
 

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Can you check valve clearances without tearing apart the sled? Any chance you could snap some pics, summarize your steps to check the clearances?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Pretty much, all you have to do to CHECK the clearance, is to remove the plastic covers, to see the valve cover. I will slide the gas tank back for more room, though I suppose you wouldn't have to. Remove the cover, then run a feeler gauge between the cam and the lifter cover. If it's in spec, put the valve cover back on, plastic etc. However if the clearance is too tight, it's a lot more work to reshim them. I'll get into to that later, if I have to.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Removed the driveshaft, the caliper bearing had some rust colored grease coming out of bit, but it felt ok, the chaincase side looked and felt perfect. As far as the valves go, 2 of the 6 exhaust, are slightly under spec, at .0075, minimum is .0083. the other 4 are around .0085, which is very close. The intakes are all ok, as they usually never go under spec.. If I was the average rider who puts on around 800 miles a year, I could wait a year or 2, but with the miles I rack up, I will re-shim all of the exhaust to the maximum spec, and check them again after another 6k or so. On the 1100na's that I did, all were quite a bit under spec, and some were almost at zero lash at 5K miles. I will get into the re-shim later this week. I will try to get an approximate time frame on the valves. Going to remove the gas tank for more working room. Checking them only took about an hour, or so. Re-shimming them will be much longer.
 

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Good to hear about your valves. At 6400 miles two of my exhaust valves were too tight for a 2 one-thousandths feeler gauge on my Pantera. I look forward to further posts.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
.002? man, that's close. When I did my '12 1100na the first time at around 5,000 miles, one of those was close to zero lash. Bad things happen at zero lash. Good news here. I found a major shortcut for doing the valves. Once you have the valve cover off, you really don't have to dis-assemble any further. Just a leverage trick using a piece of flat stock, a few zip ties and a ratchet strap. I will post some pics this weekend, when I have more time. I bought a Hot Cams shim kit on Ebay, for around $50, it has sizes you will never use, but at least you will have them. I used shims in the 180 and 185 range, so make sure you have enough of sizes in that area. there are only 3 of each in that kit. Mine is now shimmed to the max spec., and I will check it again in another 6k miles, which should be 2 seasons. It should take about 3 hours to do the whole job the next time. I had the chaincase, both shafts, skid shocks, all apart at the same time, plus doing R&D work, so my time is way more.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I need to clarify something. I need to state that you DO have to remove the cam to change the shims under the buckets. I assumed everybody new that already.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I messed up the pics a bit, sorry
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Now that I got into it, it's a close call, maybe a bit easier? I'll give a detailed write up soon.
 

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Yes mine were that tight. Sled stalled at every stop sign. Not fun. Then when ordering shim kit (Mar '19), it went on back order to June. Got it running in the fall and with the re-flash it started excellent. I look forward to your notes; the pics are certainly different (likely much faster); than what we did.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I pulled apart my clutches tonight. The secondary is like brand new. Sheaves, rollers, spring, are perfect. The primary is a different story. The arms have no waves in them, the arm bushings are a bit worn, as are the pins. The rollers are pretty used up. So I need a spider, pin kit, and arm bushings. I found everything except the bushings. I don't know if they're the same as the older ones. They look like the '90s type. I need to do some research. These are supposed to be a better clutch than the Cat ones. I had over double the miles on my 12 Cat clutch, and the rollers were mint. Progress?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Here's some text for the valve shimming. A shop manual would be helpful. This only applies for the exhaust side. Remove the spark plugs. Only turn the engine over counter clockwise. When the valve cover is off, put some hand tension between the sprockets when turning it over. I used the palm of my hand. There is a guide in the cover, that will be now removed. You have to get the valve cover off, to start with. I removed the gas tank, muffler, and the exhaust shield that covers the manifold. No sense in trying to work where you can't see. Line up all the timing marks, including the one in the mag plug. I used a paint stick to highlight all the marks, as well as marking the top of the cam, as well as the sprockets to the chain. If everything lines up before and after, it has to be correct. The lower sprocket bolt has to be removed before you lock down the chain/tensioner, as it will be hidden. leave the upper one alone for now. I picked up a 3' long 1/8" x1" flatstock from Tractor Supply. If you wedge the bar against the chain riding on the tensioner, and the intake sprocket bolt, you will see that it frees up the exhaust cam a bit. I turned the bar sideways a bit, so it would wedge between the case and the sprocket bolt. I used vise grips for this, and zip tied it all to the exhaust pipe. The next time I do this, I will weld a gusset to the bar to wedge it sideways and hold it there. I used a ratchet strap to hold slight pressure to the top of the bar, and ran it to the front bumper, over the handle bars. Leverage. Then zip tie the intake sprocket and chain together, and also zip the exhaust side, so the sprocket doesn't fall. With this, the sprocket can be unbolted, and cam removed. Put paper towels all around the cups to avoid anything from falling in the engine. Use a magnet to remove the buckets, to insure the shim stays on it. Re-shim, install the cam, torque to spec., install the sprocket with the upper bolt snug. All the marks should now line up. Release the tension, remove the bar and zip ties. Turn the engine enough to install the lower bolt, torque both, use a screwdriver through the sprocket hole to keep it from turning, Remember to keep hand tension on the chain. Turn the engine over a few times, recheck the marks. Re-assemble, have a beer.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
While I have the time, here's a pic of my chaincase drain plug and the drain hole underneath, on the lower cover.
364080
364081
 
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