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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve been reading a lot about the 800 ctek 2 running hotter than other sleds and was wondering if the extended snow flap off the 6000 r sx would help with cooling. I got my 800 last year and only put on 700 kms in good snow conditions. Temps were around 100 degrees F which is right on.

We don’t have a lot of snow up here right now and I’m thinking with the longer flap it would trap more snow and kick it back to skid. I have scratchers and that should help a lot.
I have my torsion springs set at 3 (firm) so it’s sitting quite high.I also carry 3 gallons of gas and large tool cat bag so 3 seems to work good for me.
Do you think scratchers will be enough. I would rather have too much cooling than not enough
 

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I watch temps a lot. I'm usually the one in my group with overheating problems. It is interesting to note since we all ride on the same basic machines right beside each other all day long.
There are quite a few things that seem to push high temps. The number one variable is snow. The next biggest factor is rider weight combined to ride height. (It makes a big difference.) I've tried quite a few different options to fix the problem with my weight/ride height.
1. Scratchers are easy and quickly effective. I'm still not fond of running them.
2. Bigger snow flaps help with some success based on snow conditions. The longer flap can be a hassle if you ever use reverse. I've caught a few coming off the trailer and backing in snow.
3. Track selection has helped me too. It is always a tough choice to decide with so many riding variables. A track that works for me might not be good for another rider. I've also tried running with and without studs. - I always see the claims that studs help. I have not seen a big difference between the two.
4. Back off the throttle. Speed doesn't affect the cooling as much as working the engine. The bugger creates heat when it works hard.
It is also surprising how things change with club grooming practices. I can ride the same straight trail and see temps go nuts between clubs.
These 800 motors run right on edge of cooling capacity of the procross chassis, especially for light riders. It doesn't take big changes to make them run cool. It also doesn't take much to run hot. Once hot, they are hard to cool back down.
 
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Cable scratchers will do it. With both down it almost instantly drops from 150F to under 100F. There are issues with them for sure but they will save your day if you need them.

Engines are expensive and they run aweful when hot. Over say probably 170 you can start to hear the engine back off on timing. Probably adding fuel and maybe oil as well. This is on a 6000.
 

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I watch temps a lot. I'm usually the one in my group with overheating problems. It is interesting to note since we all ride on the same basic machines right beside each other all day long.
There are quite a few things that seem to push high temps. The number one variable is snow. The next biggest factor is rider weight combined to ride height. (It makes a big difference.) I've tried quite a few different options to fix the problem with my weight/ride height.
1. Scratchers are easy and quickly effective. I'm still not fond of running them.
2. Bigger snow flaps help with some success based on snow conditions. The longer flap can be a hassle if you ever use reverse. I've caught a few coming off the trailer and backing in snow.
3. Track selection has helped me too. It is always a tough choice to decide with so many riding variables. A track that works for me might not be good for another rider. I've also tried running with and without studs. - I always see the claims that studs help. I have not seen a big difference between the two.
4. Back off the throttle. Speed doesn't affect the cooling as much as working the engine. The bugger creates heat when it works hard.
It is also surprising how things change with club grooming practices. I can ride the same straight trail and see temps go nuts between clubs.
These 800 motors run right on edge of cooling capacity of the procross chassis, especially for light riders. It doesn't take big changes to make them run cool. It also doesn't take much to run hot. Once hot, they are hard to cool back down.
 

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Member DVW cut up 3 snow flaps and made a one of kind snow flap to help with cooling. It made zero difference vs the stock flap. He tried a few different designs. he had a sled exactly like his to compare to running the stock flap at the same time. the sx flap will just make your wallet lighter
 

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Member DVW cut up 3 snow flaps and made a one of kind snow flap to help with cooling. It made zero difference vs the stock flap. He tried a few different designs. he had a sled exactly like his to compare to running the stock flap at the same time. the sx flap will just make your wallet lighter
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I was considering doing same to my snow flipper as I’ve been having cooling issues this year in particular as well…guess I won’t waist my time
 

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I watch temps a lot. I'm usually the one in my group with overheating problems. It is interesting to note since we all ride on the same basic machines right beside each other all day long.
There are quite a few things that seem to push high temps. The number one variable is snow. The next biggest factor is rider weight combined to ride height. (It makes a big difference.) I've tried quite a few different options to fix the problem with my weight/ride height.
1. Scratchers are easy and quickly effective. I'm still not fond of running them.
2. Bigger snow flaps help with some success based on snow conditions. The longer flap can be a hassle if you ever use reverse. I've caught a few coming off the trailer and backing in snow.
3. Track selection has helped me too. It is always a tough choice to decide with so many riding variables. A track that works for me might not be good for another rider. I've also tried running with and without studs. - I always see the claims that studs help. I have not seen a big difference between the two.
4. Back off the throttle. Speed doesn't affect the cooling as much as working the engine. The bugger creates heat when it works hard.
It is also surprising how things change with club grooming practices. I can ride the same straight trail and see temps go nuts between clubs.
These 800 motors run right on edge of cooling capacity of the procross chassis, especially for light riders. It doesn't take big changes to make them run cool. It also doesn't take much to run hot. Once hot, they are hard to cool back down.
hate my zr6000, can not run it below 20 degrees, tries everything
I’ve been reading a lot about the 800 ctek 2 running hotter than other sleds and was wondering if the extended snow flap off the 6000 r sx would help with cooling. I got my 800 last year and only put on 700 kms in good snow conditions. Temps were around 100 degrees F which is right on.

We don’t have a lot of snow up here right now and I’m thinking with the longer flap it would trap more snow and kick it back to skid. I have scratchers and that should help a lot.
I have my torsion springs set at 3 (firm) so it’s sitting quite high.I also carry 3 gallons of gas and large tool cat bag so 3 seems to work good for me.
Do you think scratchers will be enough. I would rather have too much cooling than not enough
when its cold there is no snow coming out the rear, so no working on the snow flap will do no good, my zr6000 has heating up badly when its cold only, i see on my f6 2007 there is heat exchanger in the rear going crossways that the zr does not have, i think this catches air from the track
 

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I rode with a buddy in March one year in the UP, my 2014 ZR8000 overheated like crazy, his 1200 doo on the same trails had no problem. We experienced the same results in Maine, and also in the Adirondacks. I have very well lubed bearings, good hyfax, coolant system full of coolant and free of air, when conditions get bad, the procross overheats. Nature of the chassis.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I started this thread about 2 years ago and never installed snow flap. I just use scratcher’s when temps get to high. Scratchers are the way to go. In low snow conditions they keep sled at 100 f all day long. My son installed flap and I’ll tell you it’s a pain in the a$$. Unloading it from the trailer you need a bungee cord to keep it from catching track, backing up of any kind on snow or Ashfault when getting gas requires a bungee cord. Temp’s we’re still running hot and he ended up putting scratches on also. Flap looks cool but that’s it.
 

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I started this thread about 2 years ago and never installed snow flap. I just use scratcher’s when temps get to high. Scratchers are the way to go. In low snow conditions they keep sled at 100 f all day long. My son installed flap and I’ll tell you it’s a pain in the a$$. Unloading it from the trailer you need a bungee cord to keep it from catching track, backing up of any kind on snow or Ashfault when getting gas requires a bungee cord. Temp’s we’re still running hot and he ended up putting scratches on also. Flap looks cool but that’s it.
sound slike after 50 + years of riding i should try them
 

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Member DVW cut up 3 snow flaps and made a one of kind snow flap to help with cooling. It made zero difference vs the stock flap. He tried a few different designs. he had a sled exactly like his to compare to running the stock flap at the same time. the sx flap will just make your wallet lighter
I modified two different snow flaps using conveyer belting. One flap was taller the other wider. Neither one worked. The modification was applied to a friends machine while another friends identical machine was used for control. I did not apply the snow flap modifications to my machine because my machine is modified with a radiator. That one works well. I tinkered with snow flaps in hopes of finding a simpler solution for others. I do not consider scratchers to be a good solution. They are dirty and offensive on more than one level.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Winter’s aren’t like they use to be. I’ve been sledding for 40 plus years and never had problems with overheating like I’ve had in the last 10 years. Mind you the sleds now are running right on the edge and heat exchanger are a lot smaller to keep weight down. The winters are different now you get two weeks of good snow and then 1 or 2 days of mild weather producing icy hard packed snow and that when the scratchers come in. I find when I’m running the road I’ll leave my right scratcher down and hang up my left.
 

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I modified two different snow flaps using conveyer belting. One flap was taller the other wider. Neither one worked. The modification was applied to a friends machine while another friends identical machine was used for control. I did not apply the snow flap modifications to my machine because my machine is modified with a radiator. That one works well. I tinkered with snow flaps in hopes of finding a simpler solution for others. I do not consider scratchers to be a good solution. They are dirty and offensive on more than one level.
Ahhh I was thinking you did the flap mod to your sled and compared to them. Not the other way around. the pictures of the wide one you showed me looked like it should have worked well. I was surprised when you said it didn’t. I also agree that you should not need scratchers to ride a trail sled on a trail to keep it cool. Never needed those before
 

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Trails are groomed better and are harder.
Engines run way leaner, this makes a huge difference. They also make more power.
Deeper lug tracks of modern day do not carry snow into the tunnel as well as a small lug track. Deeper lug throws it out the back more than picking it up.
And the snow flaps don't drag on the ground like they used to.
I think the lean running is probably the biggest contributor to heating problems. I also made a custom snow flap, it was cool, but I didn't notice much difference at all. I've wondered about using a small radiator from a dirtbike, or possibly a car heater core for some extra cooling.
 
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