Arctic Chat : Arctic Cat Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Team

I purchased a 2016 ZR8000 Limited and the inner idler wheels (at the shock) need replaced. I received new wheels with the purchase. My question is do I need to pull the entire skid out of sled or can I replace these Idler Wheels without pulling skid? Can I just lift the rear end up? The bolt the holds the idlers on also goes through the skid. I know I should pull the skid but everything else looks in excellent shape.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,743 Posts
Sounds like you have a 137" skid.
It is possible, but it's not easy. Just lifting the rear might be a simple description. You will be wrangling the sled. Make sure your lift method is solid. I like to spread the rails in that section. I loosen the cross shaft bolts and use a spreader clamp between the rails. The shaft with wheels will come out without completely splitting the skid.
Reassembly isn't too bad. Make sure the spacers are in correct locations. One thing to watch is the lower shock mount cam location. If you put it back together with that turned down, you will have to start over. It doesn't allow twisting up into position after it is together.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
616 Posts
If the inner idler wheels are worn, chances are a bunch of other stuff is too.....Pulling and reinstalling the skid is tough the first time, but well worth it.....Watch a couple videos first and go for it!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,743 Posts
I do agree with @Baydog about finding other stuff. It is possible to check and hope you found everything without pulling the skid. It's easier with the skid out.
On the other hand. I've pulled about a dozen skids. I still haven't found the easy method. :whistle:

I go through the skids often during the season. Finding little problems and fixing prevents a lot of big problems. Most of my inspection stuff is done with the skid in the sled. I loosen the track and check all the bearings and bushings. I look closely at all the bolts and check the arms for cracks. If I find something, I still end up pulling the skid much of the time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
616 Posts
I do agree with @Baydog about finding other stuff. It is possible to check and hope you found everything without pulling the skid. It's easier with the skid out.
On the other hand. I've pulled about a dozen skids. I still haven't found the easy method. :whistle:

I go through the skids often during the season. Finding little problems and fixing prevents a lot of big problems. Most of my inspection stuff is done with the skid in the sled. I loosen the track and check all the bearings and bushings. I look closely at all the bolts and check the arms for cracks. If I find something, I still end up pulling the skid much of the time.
To make installation easier, tie down the front arm and release the torsion springs.....Slide skid(front first) into position(lay cardboard inside track so skid slides in easily).....release tied down front arm and lift up onto cross shaft.....lower or raise rear of sled to align rear shaft holes to tunnel. tighten rear mount bolts. Lift torsion springs up with mounting blocks attached and install bolt to skid rail. Tighten and adjust track. Done! Many guys use a tie down on rear arm to align holes. I find it MUCH easier to just release the spring entirely and pull them into place after mounting.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,743 Posts
I have done the method @Baydog described. The one step I didn't use was the cardboard to help slide skid over the track. That part makes a lot of sense and I'm definitely going to add that into the next install.
BTW, nice description of the process.
I tried to do shortcuts without straps to tie the skid. Tried to do the install with torsion springs still attached to the rail. Trial and error on my part. I put in a lot of work trying and still added the steps in the end.
I can't stress enough the importance of a good lifting method. It doesn't need to be fancy. "I use a large ratchet strap to the rafters most of the time. I've also used strap or chain tied to loader bucket and forklift at times." It helps a ton to have something that can hold the sled well and be adjustable height.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,745 Posts
If you tip the sled on it’s side, and pull the track down at an angle you cat set the skid in the track and hook the front arm up in about 10 seconds. Then push the track up into the the tunnel. Take a pry bar and stick it through the track window and force the arm into place. You will have the skid bolted in a few minutes. If you tour the factory and watch them do it they can have it done maybe 2 minutes if that. Helps if you have 2 people
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,743 Posts
I've used the method @GregB describes with older sleds. It works fairly well. My current work area has high grit flooring and it tears up side panels and bumper corners. It helps to have a large piece of cardboard or carpet on the floor to protect the sled. I never seem to have those handy when I want to work on the sleds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
311 Posts
I've used the method @GregB describes with older sleds. It works fairly well. My current work area has high grit flooring and it tears up side panels and bumper corners. It helps to have a large piece of cardboard or carpet on the floor to protect the sled. I never seem to have those handy when I want to work on the sleds.
Laying down the sleds cover on the floor works pretty well too, just gotta hose it off when done….
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top