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Hello all,

I have a 1993 EXT 580 and I've been experiencing a problem that I've had a hard time diagnosing because it is a little inconsistent.

When I get off the trailer and start riding the roads before we get off the beaten path, it seems to run just fine, from idle all the way to WOT. However, once we start riding in the trees and/or up steeper hills, the engine will bog and fail to develop more RPM beyond about 3/4 throttle. I can't get it to rev higher than about 6500 RPM, even though it will get up to the low 8000 range early in the day on the roads. And, when I get back on roads later in the day, it will still sometimes bog at WOT, even at higher speeds.

At first it felt like a clogged carburetor issue, but I don't think that could be the case because sometimes it runs 100%. So I've narrowed it down to a clutching issue or, potentially, an issue with the engine control electronics. I don't know how much of that is going on in this sled, so I suspect it is a clutching and/or belt issue.

The primary clutch (driven clutch) is original. The secondary clutch (off the crankshaft) is a Comet clutch that was new and installed several years ago. Other than getting lubed before each ride, it has not been touched since it was installed. The sled gets light use, probably only 4-5 days per season.

So, what do you all think? Does this seem like a clutch issue and, if so, what should I be looking at? Could it even be a belt issue?

There is one other issue with this sled that is (seemingly) unrelated. If I'm in a situation where the front end comes off the ground and then lands with anything more than a gentle re-encounter with the ground, the engine begins to run very rough, and it feels like it is running on one cylinder instead of two (though I can't be certain that is the case, it is how it feels). All it takes to "fix" this (until the next incident) is to lift the hood an inch or two. Immediately, whatever was wrong is fixed and the engine runs normally. It is almost as if any amount of a rough landing causes something on the hood to short out one of the spark plugs and lifting the hood removes the short. This doesn't seem likely, since the spark plug wires are in good shape and there is no bare metal. Anyway, any ideas on that one?

Thanks in advance for reading and for any ideas you might have.
 

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if it runs poorly in the deeper snow first would check and make sure the exhaust is clear. A plugged exhaust will cause problems sometimes deep snow will cause a bog and can be cured by putting a deflector in front of the exhaust outlet to push snow clear. The primary clutch is the drive clutch (the one on the engine) and the secondary is on the jackshaft. I would check your primary for wear on the weights and rollers. and clean the sheaves also. A new belt may help but first inspect your belt and check the belt deflection.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
if it runs poorly in the deeper snow first would check and make sure the exhaust is clear. A plugged exhaust will cause problems sometimes deep snow will cause a bog and can be cured by putting a deflector in front of the exhaust outlet to push snow clear. The primary clutch is the drive clutch (the one on the engine) and the secondary is on the jackshaft. I would check your primary for wear on the weights and rollers. and clean the sheaves also. A new belt may help but first inspect your belt and check the belt deflection.
Thanks for the reply. I don't think the problem has to do with deep snow or clogging of the exhaust, but I will certainly double-check it on our next ride.

Your description of the primary vs secondary clutches is what I had previously thought, but I recently had a mechanic at a dealer tell me otherwise. Perhaps I misunderstood him. It always made sense to me that the primary would be the drive clutch (driven by the engine's crankshaft) and the secondary would be the clutch attached to the track. A quick Google search confirms that this is correct. Anyway . . .

It seems to me that if the clutch/belt system is the culprit, it is because they are not shifting properly and not allowing the engine to rev at high throttle openings. And that, perhaps, the condition is not so bad at the beginning of the ride when things are cold, but when everything warms up over time or due to slower work in the trees, it starts to manifest itself.

I think I will give that clutch a good cleaning and check the belt before the next ride, and if symptoms return on that ride I will check the exhaust.

Is it common for springs in clutches to wear out over time and need replacing?
 

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Hello all,

I have a 1993 EXT 580 and I've been experiencing a problem that I've had a hard time diagnosing because it is a little inconsistent.

When I get off the trailer and start riding the roads before we get off the beaten path, it seems to run just fine, from idle all the way to WOT. However, once we start riding in the trees and/or up steeper hills, the engine will bog and fail to develop more RPM beyond about 3/4 throttle. I can't get it to rev higher than about 6500 RPM, even though it will get up to the low 8000 range early in the day on the roads. And, when I get back on roads later in the day, it will still sometimes bog at WOT, even at higher speeds.

At first it felt like a clogged carburetor issue, but I don't think that could be the case because sometimes it runs 100%. So I've narrowed it down to a clutching issue or, potentially, an issue with the engine control electronics. I don't know how much of that is going on in this sled, so I suspect it is a clutching and/or belt issue.

The primary clutch (driven clutch) is original. The secondary clutch (off the crankshaft) is a Comet clutch that was new and installed several years ago. Other than getting lubed before each ride, it has not been touched since it was installed. The sled gets light use, probably only 4-5 days per season.

So, what do you all think? Does this seem like a clutch issue and, if so, what should I be looking at? Could it even be a belt issue?

There is one other issue with this sled that is (seemingly) unrelated. If I'm in a situation where the front end comes off the ground and then lands with anything more than a gentle re-encounter with the ground, the engine begins to run very rough, and it feels like it is running on one cylinder instead of two (though I can't be certain that is the case, it is how it feels). All it takes to "fix" this (until the next incident) is to lift the hood an inch or two. Immediately, whatever was wrong is fixed and the engine runs normally. It is almost as if any amount of a rough landing causes something on the hood to short out one of the spark plugs and lifting the hood removes the short. This doesn't seem likely, since the spark plug wires are in good shape and there is no bare metal. Anyway, any ideas on that one?

Thanks in advance for reading and for any ideas you might have.
Hello,
I have a 93 580Z doing exactly what you describe, wondering what your fix was?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hello,
I have a 93 580Z doing exactly what you describe, wondering what your fix was?
The issue we were having which was temporarily fixed by opening and closing the hood had us wondering whether something was contacting the spark plug wires where they plug in to the top of the spark plugs. Although it didn't look like the rubber on the wire had deteriorated enough to allow conduction at that point, we took little pieces of tire tube rubber and zip-tied them to the spark plug wires at that point to ensure that they were perfectly electrically insulated. I've attached an image to make it clear. That seemed to have solved the problem, and we did a few rides without any further issues. So give that a try. We have since sold the sled btw.
 

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I think the fix for that would be to pull the caps off the wires and trim the the wire back to good conductor, 1/2", 1" if needed, and then screw the caps back on the wires. This connection can loosen up over time and with repeated removal of the caps from the plugs. Always good practice to screw the caps on the wires every so often. For the 93 it may be good to check the caps for good resistance to see if there is reason to replace them.
 
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