c&a pro skis on the ctec2 800? - ArcticChat.com - Arctic Cat Forum
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post #1 of 12 Old 06-15-2019, 08:02 AM Thread Starter
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c&a pro skis on the ctec2 800?

has anyone put them on your new sled? how do they handle? and do you think they are worth the money...500$$?
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post #2 of 12 Old 06-15-2019, 08:52 AM
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I had c&a razors on my skidoo and f8. They are awesome skis. Will be picking up a set for my 18 in a few months. At low speed ( 10 -15 mph) it’s abit of a work out on arms but that only happens when I’m driving in backyard with grandson. Worth every cent
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post #3 of 12 Old 06-15-2019, 05:41 PM
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I had xpt’s on my Polaris, I second that they are a work out at low speeds, other than that they work very good, they don’t cure darting but do help. I haven’t decided yet if I’ll out some on my new rr or give curve skis a try.
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post #4 of 12 Old 06-15-2019, 07:43 PM
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I never had a problem with darting on either sled. I ran stud boy shaper bar 8 inch. When I put them on my f8 , my son 35 years old said they were to much of a work out. I’m 60 if they were that much of a work out I would know. Lol. Guess who has a set on his 800 rr now
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post #5 of 12 Old 06-20-2019, 01:12 PM
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I'd rather spend 2 hours setting up the suspension properly before throwing money at skis. Here's a post where I make some points to consider.

I can not count how many times friends and acquaintances of mine have gone from skis to skis (at ever greater prices) because of darting, and then in 1 minute I adjust up the preload on their front skid shock because they bought into that old myth that it gives better flotation to have absolutely zero preload on that shock. And magically they no longer dart along the trails like they're a train and the trail is the railroad.

FYI: Increasing preload in the middle shock often reduces understeer as well so it plows less in the corners. If you have no idea what you're doing however, I'd just try everything before settling on one of the alternatives. So start out with a neutral setup (four bathroom scales are perfect) and then try every possible change on that. So you try higher preload on the middle, lower preload on the middle, higher preload on the front, lower preload on the front, higher preload on the back, lower preload on the back, various suspension settings on the knobs you have, different air pressures on your shocks where applicable, maybe even some stiffer or softer springs since springs are relatively cheap when the alternative is 500 dollar skis (that may or may not do anything except be a really expensive placebo). Some changes in handlebar location is also possible (maybe you really should ride more forward or more backward, where you put your adjustable handlebar these days sometimes affect how hard or easy it is to turn the skis depending on the steering design).

Whenever skis are hard to turn I also tend to ask "Are they really? Or have you sat on the sofa for 30 years?". If we were as fit as we were back in the olden days when we wrestled big triple engine cruiseliners through the snow on a daily basis, we'd all be able to ride like Chris Burandt these days.
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post #6 of 12 Old 06-21-2019, 12:08 PM Thread Starter
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thank you this is what I was looking for, sled was really pushed hard in the corners, I changed the carbides which helped but did not correct 100 percent. that's why I was looking for new skis, but really cant justify the price
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post #7 of 12 Old 06-22-2019, 10:15 AM
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I would agree that setup is critical. It does take a little ride and test time to get it right for your riding style. Setup takes a little time since you may not get it perfect the first try. The beauty of learning setup is the fact that it transfers to all machines. The basic principles laid out by ronnyhugo, are the same. Think of sled suspensions as four points of contact. Start with verifying pressure between the four points. You can get pretty close without using scales. Start with the sled on a flat hard surface. Test the four contact points individually with a 1-2" board. Put the board underneath a contact point and test the suspension travel. I usually start testing by pushing down the bumpers. Then, I hop on and rock the sled front to back and side to side. I like to have the machine feel close to balanced between the four points. That can vary between riders based on preference. Adjusting out from a balanced suspension is much easier.



Darting is not caused by skis. Verify alignment first. Some understeer can be alleviated by a more aggressive ski and carbide after proper setup. That choice is based on riding style. The Procross chassis does have a lot of adjustability.


All this being said. I do swap skis at times based on riding conditions. Many of the aftermarket skis are more aggressive. I like to use a more aggressive ski on super beat up loose trails. Stock skis are actually very good in most set up trail snow.

We stopped to eat and noticed other riders coming in with snow jammed in their helmets, jackets and gloves. They had snow everywhere. We looked out the door and couldn't see across the street. Six inches of snow fell while we ate a few burgers. That was the start of a great ride.
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post #8 of 12 Old 06-23-2019, 08:01 AM Thread Starter
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darting is very minimal at best and only really happens on really hard pack, i am now looking to adjusting the suspension , i am very confused about the front shock in the skid, i have read you want to increase preload for better bite in the corners, but then i have read you want to be 1/8-to 1/4 inch from having no preload on the shock at all. and i have been getting ski lift in the corners, which they say to increase preload on the ski shocks, but that also increases ski pressure so i would have to adjust the rear to compensate, i guess it will be trial and error. which is tough to do when your skid is a block of ice lol
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post #9 of 12 Old 06-23-2019, 10:16 AM
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The term preload is confusing with how some use the term. It think of preload as the amount of pressure it takes to start moving the shock.

It helps to use flat ground and adjust spring pressure from a static point with all four shocks. I think of the center shock like the pivot point on a teeter totter. The center shock has the added variable of allowing more travel with the limiter straps. It is possible to set the pressure high and loosen the limiters at the same time. This will act like a high center on your teeter totter and make the sled rock back and forth with braking and acceleration. You can test high center pressure by pushing down at a bumper. The other end will go up. Some like that rocking. I use a more balanced approach for my setup.


These sleds do not bottom out as quick as the old iron. You can start with less spring pressure and still use your full suspension. It gives you a lot more adjustability with so much suspension travel. It also means that the inside ski does lift easier. (The outside is compressing.) Inside ski lift isn't really a bad thing if you are comfortable. That outside ski is really digging into the snow. Riding that way required a little modification on my riding style. I like to push down more with my inside foot to hold more speed through the corners.
I agree that it is hard to adjust the skid when it is a block of ice. I usually try to get the skid shocks close before I ride. Coupler blocks and ski springs are easy to adjust after you start riding.


BTW, I ride with some guys that weigh in on the heavy side. Their machines are set up for their weight. They rarely see inside ski lift. Their sleds corner relatively flat all day long on smooth trails. I also wait for them all the time in the twisties. We swap machines a lot to compare. I weigh a lot less. I can just sit and ride their machines around the corners with barely any ski lift. Stiff setup isn't terrible if you are cruising all day long on smooth trails. Rough trails are more work. The machine pushes skis more and rides rougher when set up stiff. I do not want to be on their sleds if we are hitting junk.

We stopped to eat and noticed other riders coming in with snow jammed in their helmets, jackets and gloves. They had snow everywhere. We looked out the door and couldn't see across the street. Six inches of snow fell while we ate a few burgers. That was the start of a great ride.
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post #10 of 12 Old 06-24-2019, 09:51 PM
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Razors suck on the procross. Go with the xpt if you have your heart set on c&a. The razors might work decent if you hack a couple inches off the back of the ski with a sawzall
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